More News

Sep 18,2021

Friends of Public Square (FOPS) Update on Seventh Street Park

The Friends of the Public Square (FOPS) is committed to rejuvenating the 7th Street Park. FOPS has a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with the City of Hudson, which was approved by the Common Council following a public hearing.

In its initial year, FOPS has initiated several preliminary improvements in consultation with the Department of Public Works. On September 12, FOPS organized a community event to paint the benches a more attractive color, Essex Green. FOPS also received permission from Mayor Johnson to have the two fences around the fountain removed after it was reported that the fountain was inoperable. The high voltage signs and double fences were no longer necessary to protect the public from a fountain that had retained inactive wiring for years. FOPS plans to paint the fountain basin green as well. Next month, FOPS plans to plant daffodils around the fountain, which will come out in the spring. The plaques on the fences have been preserved. 

The removal of the fences does not prevent the later installation of a safe and attractive fountain, nor signal that a statue will stand in the place of the old fountain. Before any permanent changes are made to the park, there be will be an intensive process of community engagement beginning in November. No permanent changes will be made to the park without public input, and final sign-off from the Historic Preservation Commission (HPC). Notice of community meetings will be made via as many avenues as possible and held at various times to allow maximum participation.

Follow Friends of the Public Square on Instagram and Facebook for more updates, or contact the organization at fopshudson@gmail.com to learn more.


Sep 15,2021

Comments Requested on Draft Request for Expressions of Interest for Community Solar Farm Development

The City of Hudson seeks to site a municipal solar energy system for the benefit of the City, its residents, and the environment. The City will be soliciting Requests for Expressions of Interest ("RFEI") from experienced developers interested in leasing all or a portion of identified municipal land sites to design, build, finance, operate, and maintain a Solar Photovoltaic Energy System (i.e. Solar Farm) with the following general goals for the project:

  1. Purposefully utilize otherwise unusable municipal property.
  2. Reduce energy costs for residents through a community solar project.
  3. Advance the community's environmental sustainability and leadership goals.
  4. Increase revenue for the Municipality through a land lease.
A draft version of the RFEI can be found at this link. Comments on this document should be directed to Common Council President Thomas DePietro by email at councilpres@cityofhudson.org or by mail at 520 Warren St., Hudson, NY 12534.

Sep 14,2021

City Publishes Draft Request for Proposals on Adaptive Reuse Feasibility Study for Former Hudson Library

The City of Hudson is requesting proposals from qualified firms to complete an adaptive reuse feasibility study for the former historic Hudson Area Library building located at 400 State Street in Hudson. The City of Hudson is considering whether to utilize the aforementioned property to accommodate and consolidate various citywide programs and services in an existing historical building that will be donated to the City of Hudson. The availability of sufficient on-site parking for city services consumers is a factor to be considered.

A draft Request for Proposals can be viewed at this link. Comments on this draft document may be directed to Common Council President Thomas DePietro via email at councilpres@cityofhudson.org or by mail at 520 Warren St, Hudson, NY 12534.

Sep 13,2021

Montgomery Street Discontinuance

PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the City of Hudson Common Council will decide on October 19, 2021, whether to discontinue the use of approximately fifty (50) feet of the northern end of Montgomery Street in the City of Hudson. This section of Montgomery Street is immediately southeast of and adjacent to that portion of Montgomery Street discontinued by the Common Council on April 20, 2021. If the Common Council discontinues this portion of the street it is the intention of the City to sell the discontinued portion of the street to the adjoining property owners at fair market value.  The Common Council will hear verbal comments at the Informal Council Meeting on October 12, 2021 and will accept written comments until October 18, 2021.  A map of the area of proposed discontinuance is available on the City of Hudson website at www.cityofhudson.org. Written comments may be submitted to Tracy Delaney, City Clerk  cityclerk@cityofhudson.org

Montgomery St Sale Map


Sep 02,2021

Tree Inventory Continues: Oakdale Woodlands in the Spotlight

Vanessa Baehr, Liz Yorck, and ISA Forester Miguel BerriosOn Tuesday, August 31, Arborist Miguel Berrios got a tour of the Hudson Oakdale Lake woodland trail system. Youth Director Liz Yorck and Youth Program Director Vanessa Baehr talked with Berrios about the tree canopy, the understory, and invasive species. Berrios has been hired by the City of Hudson to do a complete Street and Park Tree Inventory and 5-year Community Forestry Management plan for the city thanks to a grant from the New York State Department of Conservation Division of Urban Forestry. He and Baehr discussed methods of eliminating invasive species. They were also able to identify trees that could be potentially dangerous, and non-native ones that are causing more desirable native trees to not thrive.

ISA Forester Miguel Berrios, Youth Director Liz Yorck, and Youth Program Director Vanessa BaehrBerrios is also a Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS) Certified Technical Service Provider for Habitat Planning. Baehr, who is very knowledgeable about all things flora, Oakdale, and the history of the site, and Yorck, who is newer to this part of the county and to Oakdale, were able to augment their knowledge and confirm restoration concepts with Berrios. Yorck and Baehr are shaping a plan to eliminate invasive species, create new outdoor education spaces, and design trails that will lead to microenvironments within the site.

Thanks to Yorck, Baehr, Hudson DPW, and volunteers, a great deal of work was done on the trails and in the woods this summer. Much debris and overgrowth has been cleared out, trees brought down by storms have been removed and on this trip we were able to get all the litter in one grocery bag. I highly recommend a visit to Oakdale Lake trails.

When Berrios returns with his full presentation of his findings and management plan recommendations we hope that the youth, the future stewards of Oakdale Lake Park, will be able to attend.

Hilary Hillman
Hudson Conservation Advisory Council
Yorck and Baehr carrying out litter.
 

Sep 01,2021

Universal Basic Income (UBI) Pilot Program Launches Second Cohort in Hudson

HudsonUP, the nation's first small City UBI Pilot, will launch a second cohort of 50 participants disbursing $500 per month payments for 5 years.

HudsonUP will be expanding to include a second cohort of 50 participants, selected through a weighted lottery system, to receive $500 a month of unrestricted cash for 5 years. This brings the total number of participants up to 75 for the City of Hudson, over 1% of the population.

The lottery will officially be open September 1st through September 30th, and City of Hudson residents over the age of 18 can enter if they make under the annual median income ($39,346.00). The lottery form can be accessed at hudsonup.org and is available in English, Spanish and Bangla. The lottery process is weighted for equity (race and gender) using the Opportunity Atlas data set and was decided upon as a result of a community-driven process in planning the first cohort. The lottery is being run by an independent research team at Washington University in St. Louis. Participants will be notified if they were selected the first week of October.

Hudson native and non-profit management professional, Joan Hunt, will continue in her role as HudsonUP Pilot Director and will oversee the overall communications strategy and day-to-day operations of the program. Ms. Hunt will be the primary contact for the Pilot's participants and will serve as the chief spokesperson for the program. “Over the past year, I have witnessed first-hand the tremendous impact of the HudsonUP program on participants and their families and can't wait to include additional Hudson residents in the second cohort.” said Ms. Hunt, “I'm honored to continue serving as HudsonUP's Pilot Director and to help share the story of basic income in Hudson, with the local community, the country, and the world.”

Hudson Mayor Kamal Johnson has been supportive of HudsonUP from the very early stages of planning and has continued to serve as a member of the Pilot's Community Advisory Board. “The HudsonUP Pilot was launched as an investment in the community. I'm extremely excited that this investment will benefit more of our community at a time when people really need a helping hand.”

The second cohort is being supported by the Eutopia Foundation in partnership with The Spark of Hudson. “Given the huge success of HudsonUP's first cohort, we are thrilled to underwrite a second cohort, guaranteeing 50 additional Hudson residents (75 in all) will receive basic income for 5 years. If the first cohort is any indication, this program should have an enormous impact on participants, their families and the community as a whole.”

To learn more about the HudsonUP UBI Pilot, please visit HudsonUP.org. For press inquiries, please contact joan@hudsonup.org.


Aug 25,2021

City of Hudson Seeks Interest in Potential Grant Funding for Housing Rehabilitation

The City of Hudson seeks interest from landlords or residents who are homeowners needing funding for housing rehabilitation. 

The City of Hudson will submit an application under the Community Development Block Grant program (CDBG). The City will be eligible for up to $500,000 in funding through the New York State Office of Community Renewal (OCR).  If the City is awarded the funding, the City will establish a grant program to bring housing stock up to code. The grant will fund rehabilitation of owner-occupied or rental housing. Funds for owner-occupied housing (including owner-occupied 2/3 family housing) is for household at under 80% of the Area Median Income (approximately $54,000 for a family of 3). Preference will be given to households that are under 50% of the Area Median income (approximately $36,600 for a family of three). Owners of rental housing whose tenants are under 80% of the Area Median Income can also apply for rental rehabilitation support.

If you are a homeowner and/or landlord interested in participating in the program, please fill out the form at bit.ly/CDBGHudson, contact the Mayor’s office at 518-828-7217, or fill out a paper form at City Hall. The City will contact you, explain the program in detail, and obtain more information. Please be aware that, at this time, funding is neither guaranteed, nor does providing information secure you a priority status should the funding be awarded. However, funding is likely to be on a first-come, first-serve basis, with priorities given in the manner described above. Reaching out now to express interest increases the chances the City will receive this funding, and means the City can reach out to you directly should the funding be awarded.


Aug 20,2021

K.I.S.S. - Keeping Identities of Seniors Safe

K.I.S.S. - Keeping Identities of Seniors Safe

DATE:  8/30/2021 - 9/10/2021
TIME:  Monday - Friday   8:30am - 4:00pm
LOCATON:    Hudson City Hall
                      520 Warren Street
                      Hudson, NY 12534

The Columbia County KISS Program is once again available to seniors in every town in Columbia County.  The KISS Program, founded by Columbia County Clerk Holly Tanner, stands for Keeping the Identities of Seniors Safe.  It was designed to protect the identities of our seniors while assisting them in the shredding of their sensitive materials.  Seniors are encouraged to contact their local Town Hall for hours of operation and more information on the program.  Justin Weaver, Columbia County Clerk's Records Services Manager, is overseeing the program and can also be reached with any questions at 518-822-0143.

For Additional Information click here.

To view the Item Retention Guideline and Disposal List click here.

Aug 19,2021

Second Hudson Connects Workshop Postponed

Please note that our second Public Workshop for Hudson Connects originally scheduled for Tuesday, August 24 is being rescheduled. After a great first meeting last month, the team has taken several steps to solicit more feedback on the initial vision, from which we are still awaiting comments to incorporate into the design. Once these have been received and incorporated into the plans, a date/time will be circulated for the second Public Workshop to share the revised concepts. Thank you so much for your understanding, and we look forward to meeting again.

Aug 19,2021

Summer 2021 Hudson Tree Inventory Begins

Hudson Tree Canopy 

The trees in the City of Hudson will be inventoried this month by an ISA forester. This August you may see people looking at and evaluating our trees in public spaces; this will be ISA Certified Arborist, Miguel Berrios, or members of his team from Land Beyond the Sea of Ithaca, New York. Berrios, who is also Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS) Certified Technical Service Provider for Habitat Planning, has been awarded the contract for executing the urban forestry work of Street and Park Tree Inventory and writing up a Community Forest Management Plan for the care of these important community members. All of this is made possible by a grant awarded to the City of Hudson by the New York State Department of Conservation and was applied for by the Hudson Conservation Advisory Council.

Berrios-1What goes into a tree Inventory?

The foresters will evaluate each tree noting it’s species, DBH (diameter at breast height), health, exact GPS location and any management needs. This information will be provided to the city in an excel-friendly, update-able, format and also in hard copy.

What is a Community Forest Management Plan?

The Foresters will review the data and make a 5-year management plan recommendation from their findings. The plan will have an overview of the state of the Hudson canopy, list recommended maintenance in order of priority, such as, immediate removal due to danger, likely to fail, necessary pruning, tree pit too small to sustain tree, and more.  They will also look at the diversity of species to help us balance out as we move forward and plant more trees; thus avoiding the sad result of losing many of our Ash trees in the swift spread of the Emerald Ash Borer.

Berrios-2Why is this important for our community?

We need to know what we have so that we can plan for future planting of more trees and we need to preserve and maintain those trees that we currently have thriving. Trees are quiet workhorses in the environment; they sequester carbon, provide oxygen, soak up rainwater, create habitat and sustenance for pollinators, provide shade for our buildings, sidewalks and roads to help reduce the effect of global warming and help keep cooling prices down.  All that, and they look darn good while doing it.

So, if you see Mr. Berrios or members of his team snooping around trees, please welcome them and maybe offer a glass of water.  Their work is as important as the trees are to our community.

Many thanks to the New York State Department on Environmental Conservation.


Aug 17,2021

City Hall Mask Policy Update

In order to protect the health and safety of the public and City employees, due to the spread of COVID-19 variant(s) and the City’s obligation to hold in person meetings pursuant to the Open Meetings Law, effective immediately, no one may attend a public meeting or hearing in City Hall or any City owned and operated building without wearing a mask, even individuals who have been fully vaccinated against the COVID-19 virus. 

Further, due to the small size of the City Hall Common Council Chamber, often used for public meetings, the number of people who may attend meetings in the Chamber, not including the Council or board members themselves, will be limited to 10 members of the public at any one time. Members of the public who attend public meetings must maintain a social distance of 6 feet.  To supplement public access, the City will utilize an “Owl” camera, screen and projector to allow the public to participate in meetings and hearings virtually.  Details of those wishing to participate via the Owl can be found on the City’s website.

Anyone who does not comply with this policy shall be removed from City Hall or other property owned and operated by the City.


Aug 09,2021

HCHC and City of Hudson Seeking Applicants for Housing Justice Organizing Fellowship

The Hudson Catskill Housing Coalition (HCHC) and the City of Hudson are accepting applications for a six-month Housing Justice Organizing Fellowship.

The goal of this fellowship is to nurture and grow the leadership abilities and organizing skills of public and affordable housing residents, so that they can nurture and grow the movement for housing justice in the Hudson area. 

This fellowship lasts six months from October 2021 until March 2022. The training series includes ten 2-hour trainings via Zoom (roughly 2 per month for 5 months), 2 weekend retreats (one at the beginning and one towards the end, dates TBD), and one field trip to connect with housing organizers in Buffalo. Trainings will teach foundational organizing skills, practices, and systems that this community will build on for years to come. 

Additionally, fellows will work with HCHC during the fellowship to organize several housing justice-related projects, including an eviction defense program, a community needs assessment survey, and a public education campaign. 

This is a paid fellowship funded by the City of Hudson’s Anti-Displacement Learning Grant. Fellows will receive a $500 monthly stipend for 6 months. Fellows are asked to commit approximately 15-25 hours per month to training and organizing work, supported by HCHC staff. 

This fellowship is open to residents 1) who are 16 years or older, 2) who represent the public housing and low-income communities of Hudson and Catskill, NY, and 3) who are committed to organizing for housing justice. Interested applicants should apply here: https://forms.gle/w6UgpTDNK8XVNQpb7.


Jul 26,2021

FOPS and City Take First Steps to Rejuvenate the Seventh Street Park

Last week, Mayor Kamal Johnson and Commissioner of Public Works Peter Bujanow signed a Memorandum of Understanding with Friends of the Public Square HUDSON, or FOPS, a new non-profit formed by Hudson residents. The MOU was previously approved by the Common Council following a presentation by co-chair Dorothy Heyl on how FOPS will raise funds and plan projects for Hudson’s “public square,” known as the Seventh Street Park. The MOU provides a framework for FOPS to collaborate with the City and Hudson citizens on park projects.

As a first step, co-chair Katherine Kanaga and board members Walter Chatham and David Dew Bruner met last Wednesday with Rob Perry, the Supervisor of the Department of Public Works. On the agenda were interim measures that FOPS would like to accomplish during its first year, prior to any long-term plans or significant fund raises. These measures include addressing the current state of the fountain, which is no longer operable, painting benches a more attractive color until new benches can be chosen, pruning trees in poor condition, and mulching and planting bulbs. Perry was supportive of FOPS’ involvement with the park and agreed that DPW would remove the double fences from the fountain later this year and do certain pruning of trees as recommended by an arborist retained by FOPS, within the limitations of DPW equipment. Two volunteer days, organized by Bruner, are now being planned in the fall, for painting benches and planting and mulching.

FOPS welcomes community input on any of these initiatives and looks forward to productive collaboration with the DPW. As the volunteer days approach, Bruner will be reaching out to local groups and businesses for participants. Comments can be made via fopshudson@gmail.com, Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/fopshudson/, and on Facebook at Friends of the Public Square Hudson or FOPS.

Friends Of the Public Square HUDSON is a non-profit corporation formed in New York State and registered with the New York State Charities Bureau. FOPS has submitted its application to the IRS for status as a non-taxed charitable organization.

Jul 23,2021

Mayor Johnson Announces Joint City/County Task Force to Close Gaps in Mental Health and Substance Use Disorder Services

Today, City of Hudson Mayor Kamal Johnson announced formation of a Joint City/County Task Force to implement the recommendations contained in the Columbia County Sequential Intercept Model (SIM) Mapping Report.

The SIM Report was created by the City with assistance from the Greenburger Center for Social and Criminal Justice, as part of Mayor Johnson’s criminal justice reform plan. The SIM report identified gaps in the County’s mental health and substance use disorder service infrastructure and offered recommendations on how to best fill those gaps.

“The criminal justice system has become this country’s answer to people living with serious mental illness and substance use disorders and their families. Here in Hudson and Columbia County, we want to change that,” said Mayor Kamal Johnson. Johnson went on to say, “I want to thank all those who will be serving on the Joint Task Force and look forward to working together to find a pathway forward.”

“The Greenburger Center is honored to continue its work in Columbia County by facilitating the Joint Task Force’s work. I look forward to working with Task Force members and am hopeful we can forge productive working relationships with the state as we find ways to get the services most needed to those most in need in Columbia County,” said Cheryl Roberts, Executive Director of the Greenburger Center.
Joint Task Force Members are:

  • Daniel Almasi, Director of Community Services, Department Head Dept. of Human Services, Deputy Director/ Director of Clinical Services, Columbia County Dept. of Human Services
  • David Bartlett, Sheriff, Columbia County, New York
  • Christy Bass, District Executive, 3rd Judicial District, New York
  • Ron Caponera, Controller, Columbia County Office of the Controller, New York
  • Michael Chameides, 3rd Ward Supervisor, Hudson, New York
  • Vincent Doto, Director Columbia County Probation Department, Columbia County, New York
  • Kathy Eldridge, Town Supervisor, Town of Greenport, New York
  • Mishanda Franklin-Cox, Patrol Sergeant, City of Hudson Police Department, Hudson, New York
  • Robert Gibson, Commissioner, Columbia County Dept. of Social Services, Columbia County, New York
  • Francis Greenburger, Founder, Greenburger Center for Social and Criminal Justice and CEO, Time Equities, Inc.
  • Martin F. Horn, Distinguished Lecturer in Corrections, John Jay College, City University of New York
  • Kamal Johnson, Mayor, City of Hudson, New York
  • PJ Keeler, Treasurer, Columbia County, New York
  • Tina Lee, Executive Director, Twin Counties Recovery Services, Inc.
  • Kim Lybolt, Director of Student Services, Hudson City School District
  • Matt Murell, Chairman, Columbia County Board of Supervisors, Columbia County, New York
  • Linda Mussmann, 4th Ward Supervisor, Hudson, New York
  • Jeffrey Rovitz, Executive Director, Mental Health Association of Columbia and Greene Counties
  • Keith Stack, Executive Director, The Addictions Care Center of Albany
  • Brian Stewart, Psychiatric Program Director, Columbia Memorial Hospital
  • Susan V. Tipograph, Esq., Criminal Defense Attorney, Former President of New York's chapter of the National Lawyers Guild.
Facilitator: Cheryl Roberts, Esq., Executive Director, Greenburger Center for Social and Criminal Justice; Corporation Counsel, City of Hudson, New York

The Task Force will have a 6-month goal to issue a report identifying viable recommendations from the SIM Report and outlining steps to implement those recommendations.

Jul 16,2021

Sale of City Property Formerly a Portion of Montgomery Street

PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that pursuant to Section 41-1 of the City Code of the City of Hudson, the Common Council intends to vote on July 20, 2021 at its regularly scheduled meeting, to sell an approximately 0.064 acre parcel of land to Benjamin Fain for the price of $50,000 based upon an independent appraisal of the value of the property.  This parcel was previously a portion of Montgomery Street that was discontinued by an April 20, 2021 resolution of the Common Council.



Jul 07,2021

Assemblymember Barrett Secures Funding for City of Hudson Children and Families

Assemblymember Didi Barrett (Columbia & Dutchess Counties) announced Thursday, July 1 that she secured $80,000 in this legislative session for key programs impacting children and families in the City of Hudson: $50,000 for the Greater Hudson Promise Neighborhood to partner with the Hudson Day Care Center to build capacity and expand child care, and $30,000 in Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant (JAG) funding to bolster training for Hudson Police Department (HPD) in sensitive and effective family and child crisis intervention strategies. These funds will help ensure that Hudson’s youth are provided with a foundation for success, and that Hudson police receive facilitated and targeted training for situations involving children and young adults.

“Hudson is a small city with all the same challenges of bigger cities across the state, but our secret weapon is the Greater Hudson Promise Neighborhood (GHPN), a pioneering cradle to career community organization that works in a variety of ways with children and families within the footprint of the Hudson City School District,” said Assemblymember Barrett. “Childcare is a critical need in the city,  and this funding will allow GHPN to help critical providers like Hudson Day Care Center, develop the capacity to effectively meet the local demand. GHPN will also be instrumental in working with the Mayor’s office and HPD in improving intervention strategies involving children and families through the Byrne/JAG funding.  I’m pleased to support Mayor Johnson and his team in realizing their important goals of better communication between the community and HPD and enhanced crisis intervention training."

“We are honored to receive funding from the Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant. This funding will help the city complete our plans to have all of our officers complete the Crisis Intervention Trainings. Providing them with the skills of effective problem solving and promoting positive outcomes when responding to incidents involving trauma and mental health,” said Hudson Mayor Kamal Johnson. “We would like to thank Assemblymember Barrett and her team for securing this grant. It will mean a lot in the advance of police community relations in our community.”

“The Greater Hudson Promise Neighborhood is thrilled for this opportunity to support our community's youngest children,” said Joan E. Hunt, Executive Director of the Greater Hudson Promise Neighborhood. “We applaud Assemblywoman Barrett for recognizing and acknowledging the importance of expanding high-quality early learning opportunities for historically excluded children and families. We look forward to engaging in a meaningful and longstanding partnership with the Hudson Day Care Center and other local childcare providers."

“Since the murder of George Floyd, Hudson has been on the cutting edge of criminal justice reform. Funding from Assemblymember Barrett will not only help train HPD officers in Crisis Intervention Training, it will allow the City go beyond that basic training and enable facilitated, on-going dialogue between law enforcement and the community they serve,” said Cheryl Roberts, Corporation Counsel for the City of Hudson and Executive Director of the Greenburger Center for Social and Criminal Justice. “It will also help protect children during police encounters with their parents or caregivers.”

“Hudson Daycare looks forward to its partnership with Promise Neighborhood to match the needs of the community and ensure families have access to high quality and affordable programs to foster healthy development to children ages 5 and above.” said Kimberly Griffin-Simmonds, Program Director of the Hudson Day Care. 


Jun 24,2021

The End of Virtual City Meetings


After June 24, 2021, the City of Hudson will no longer be able to conduct virtual meetings pursuant to the Governor's  Executive Order 202.1.  Any meeting of a public body conducted after June 24, 2021 may only be conducted pursuant to the New York State Open Meetings Law.  Specifically, the public must be allowed to attend meetings of public bodies in person.  

Jun 18,2021

Water Advisory Update

Water Advisory Update - 6/18/2021

Since restarting the Water Treatment Plant Wednesday night, the Hudson Water Department has been able to provide the city with necessary water, while simultaneously building our tank volume by 750,000 gallons.

Our finished water tank is now at 1.5 million gallons or 60% of its designed capacity.  Based on current usage, we anticipate that the tank should be at full capacity by Tuesday morning.

At this point there is no expectation that Hudson will need to interconnect with Greenport but we have the plan in-place and equipment on-site should that need change.

The poly pig is still lodged in the "T" at our Claverack Pump station and excavation of the site is the only solution to extract the pig.

There is a large degree for coordination that will be necessary given the age, depth and constraints of the site.  There are also various materials and pipe components that have long lead times for fabrication and/or delivery.  Because of these two (2) mitigating factors, we don't expect the extraction to be logistically feasible for a few weeks.

Since water flow is consistent, and our tank volume is steadily building, it is our plan to fill the tank while we also plan and prepare for extraction.  The extraction must be done efficiently and safely.  

For the next few days, we ask all residents, businesses and guests to use water conscientiously and take proactive measures to manage their consumption.

We discourage using water for :  


- Car Washing,
- Lawn and/or garden watering,
- Filling pools

Our situation improves significantly with each passing day.  We simply request YOUR cooperation for the next few days.













Jun 15,2021

Water Advisory


Water Advisory

The public water supply for the City of Hudson requires that raw (untreated) water is captured and collected into the Churchtown Reservoir. Raw water is delivered to the city via a 16” cast iron water main that was installed in the early 1900’s.

As part of our annual maintenance of this main, the Hudson Water Department sends a poly-pig with bristles through the main to clean the inside of any tuberculation. The department has conducted this operation for decades with the occasional issue.

This year, for an unknown reason the poly pig became stuck in the water main. Several attempts to use higher flows to dislodge the pig proved unsuccessful and further attempts are unlikely as the process consumes filtered potable water from our tank.

Currently, we are excavating a site near one of our valves to gain access to the main. We have also asked our neighbors from the Town of Greenport to use their sewer camera to make further investigation from an alternate site. We believe we have located the poly-pig, and when it is found, we will undertake all necessary actions to excavate and remove the pig.

This process is expected to go well into the night and quite possibly continue into Wednesday.

The tank is down 20% and will continue to drop as we are unable to produce water at this time. Accordingly, we ask all residents and businesses to conserve water wherever possible. Please refrain from any nonessential uses like watering lawns, flowers, filling swimming pools, or washing cars, etc.

At the point that our supply continues to drop we will prepare to initiate our back-up water supply, as well as investigate other short-term measures to ensure the quality and availability of our public water supply.

Thank you for your cooperation.

~City of Hudson

 

 

 


Jun 08,2021

Wear a Mask

Do your part to keep Hudson Safe. If a business requires people to wear masks, please wear a mask. Masks are required in municipal buildings. CDC and New York State require unvaccinated individuals to wear a mask in most business settings.

mask Using masks is proven to reduce the spread of coronavirus. New York State guidelines include "Businesses are authorized to...require six feet of social distancing and masks for all individuals." When entering a local business, please respect the business's policy regarding masks and physical distance. Learn more about Coronavirus

Jun 01,2021

K.I.S.S. - Keeping Identities of Seniors Safe

K.I.S.S. - Keeping Identities of Seniors Safe

DATE: 6/7/2021 - 6/25/2021
TIME: Monday - Friday 8:30AM - 5:00PM
Location:   Hudson City Hall
                  520 Warren Street
                  Hudson, NY 12534

The Columbia County KISS Program is once again available to seniors in every town in Columbia County.  The KISS Program, founded by Columbia County Clerk Holly Tanner, stands for Keeping the Identities of Seniors Safe.  It was designed to protect the identities of our seniors while assisting them in the shredding of their sensitive materials.  Seniors are encouraged to contact their local Town Hall for hours of operation and more information on the program.  Justin Weaver, Columbia County Clerk's Records Services Manager, is overseeing the program and can also be reached with any questions at 518-822-0143.

For Additional information click here.

To View the Item Retention Guideline and Disposal list click here.

Jun 01,2021

Certified Climate Smart Community

The City of Hudson proudly announces that it was recently certified as a Climate Smart Community by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC). By taking meaningful steps to mitigate and adapt to climate change, Hudson met the criteria to be recognized as a leader during the second quarter round of review. Cornell Cooperative Extension of Columbia and Greene Counties provided guidance and technical assistance to Hudson in preparing its certification submission. 

“Climate change will have devastating impacts and the City of Hudson must reduce greenhouse gas emissions,” says Mayor Kamal Johnson. “We must prepare for a changing climate by identifying and deploying adaptation strategies. It’s an added benefit that many of these climate strategies will save money over the long term.”

“DEC applauds the work of these six communities who are helping address the climate crisis by acting locally and bolstering New York State’s climate leadership by doing so,” Commissioner Seggos said. “We look forward to working with these Climate Smart Communities and other local leaders who are incorporating clean energy, climate resiliency, and reduced greenhouse gas emissions, among other actions, in plans that benefit local residents and New York State.”

Started in 2009, the interagency Climate Smart Communities program provides guidance and technical support to local governments to take locally-driven climate action. The first step to becoming climate smart is to register by pledging to reduce emissions and adapt to climate change. 

The certification program was launched in 2014 to document and celebrate the accomplishments of communities taking climate action. There are now 70 certified Climate Smart Communities in New York State and two in Columbia County. To be certified, communities must demonstrate an active climate change task force that includes residents and municipal representatives.

The certification program is designed around the ten pledge elements and provides a framework for communities to organize and advance their sustainability and resilience efforts. Through the program, communities can choose from a menu of over 100 actions for addressing emissions, land use, waste management, energy conservation, and clean energy, as well as climate adaptation and public education. Each action that a community completes earns points towards achieving Climate Smart Communities certification.

Communities apply for certification by documenting the completion of their chosen actions, which must equal a minimum of 120 points. The submission undergoes a rigorous review process, and communities that successfully document the completion of actions are awarded certification at the bronze, silver, and gold levels. Communities that earn a minimum of 120 points are certified at the bronze level and those that earn a minimum of 300 points are certified at the silver level.

The City of Hudson earned 127 points, seven points more than the 120 points required for bronze-level certification. Recent actions that garnered points include creating a Flood Guide and Culvert Management Plan, improvements to bicycle infrastructure, and lighting-efficiency improvements.  

Communities that implement certification actions receive many benefits, including energy independence and improved air quality from switching to clean renewables, cost savings through greater energy efficiency, and reduction of risks related to flooding and other climate-related hazards. Some additional benefits of Climate Smart Communities certification include streamlined access to resources, training, tools, and expert guidance; opportunities for networking and sharing best practices with peers; and better scores on grant applications for some state funding programs. Certified Climate Smart Communities are recognized as New York’s leaders in local climate action.  

Cornell Cooperative Extension of Columbia and Greene Counties provides assistance to communities with an interest in earning Climate Smart Communities certification through their membership in the Climate Resilience Partnership. The Climate Resilience Partnership is a collaboration between Cornell Cooperative Extension associations in the Hudson Valley, with financial and technical support from the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation’s Hudson River Estuary Program and the New York State Water Resources Institute. The partnership aims to build long-term resilience to extreme weather and climate change in the Hudson River Estuary watershed. The partnership provides resources to local communities pursuing climate change adaptation efforts and assistance to municipalities with Climate Smart Communities certification. The program serves communities in Columbia, Dutchess, Greene, Rensselaer, Rockland, and Ulster counties.  For more information about the Climate Resilience Partnership, visit www.climateresiliencepartnership.org.

The Hudson River Estuary Program helps people enjoy, protect, and revitalize the Hudson River and its valley. Created in 1987 through the Hudson River Estuary Management Act, the program focuses on the tidal Hudson and adjacent watershed from the federal dam at Troy to the Verrazano Narrows in New York City. The Estuary Program has seven key focus areas: clean water, resilient waterfront communities, vital estuary habitats, sustainable fisheries, natural areas & scenery, education & public engagement, and access & inspiration. For more information about the Hudson River Estuary Program’s climate change initiatives, visit wri.cals.cornell.edu/hudson-river-estuary/climate-change-hudson-river-estuary/.

New York State Water Resources Institute, based at Cornell University, has a mission to advance water resource management and address critical water resource problems in New York State and across the nation.  NYS Water Resources Institute builds towards this mission by leveraging unique access to scientific and technical resources at Cornell University and in collaboration with partners to improve communications and networks for promoting water literacy and management. For more information about the Water Resources Institute, visit wri.cals.cornell.edu/.

For more information about Hudson’s sustainability initiatives visit https://cityofhudson.org/business/sustain.php.

6/1/21

May 27,2021 dugway

Dugway Trail Reopened

The City of Hudson partnered with the Hudson River Valley Greenway (HVRG), a New York State agency, to make improvements to the Dugway trail.

HRVG rehabilitated the one-quarter mile Dugway trail, a walking and bicycling path which connects Harry Howard Avenue and Mill Street. The Dugway trail is also part of the Empire State Trail and is adjacent to the recently completed shared path improvements on Harry Howard Avenue. The Dugway Trail is also adjacent to Charles Williams Park and in close proximity to the dog park. HRVG completed the project with state funds from the Empire State Trail program.

“We need to expand access to our public parks,” says Mayor Kamal Johnson. “This project improves our infrastructure, reduces municipal costs, and will make it easier for people of all abilities to enjoy our city.”

dugway

The following improvements have been completed:

  • A new 10-foot wide paved path was installed, including site work, grading, and drainage improvements to stabilize the trail corridor.
  • The adjacent trail shoulders were graded and topsoil, grass seed and mulch were installed.
  • ADA detectable warning strips, concrete pads, and removable bollards were installed at the trail entrances.
  • A concrete curb was installed where the trail intersects with Lucille Drive/Harry Howard Ave, to better define this intersection and reduce the crosswalk length.
  • A new wood fence has been installed, separating the trail from the adjacent residential property
  • New run of wood guide rail replaced an old guide rail
  • Empire State Trail and bicycle safety signage has been installed.
    .

Information about the Empire State Trail, including detailed trail descriptions and an online map depicting the trail route, designated parking areas, and nearby attractions is available on the project website: https://empiretrail.ny.gov.

5/27/2021


May 24,2021

Wastewater Planning Grant

The City of Hudson has been awarded a $100,000 grant to create a long-term plan to reduce sewer overflow. The grant is awarded by the New York State Environmental Facilities Corporation and Department of Environmental Conservation from the Wastewater Infrastructure Engineering Planning Grant Program through the New York Clean Water State Revolving Fund. 

Many cities on the Hudson River, including Hudson, have a combined system for sewage and stormwater runoff. During storms, the surge of water is beyond the capacity of the sewage treatment plant and the untreated overflow goes straight into our waterways. New York’s Department of Environmental Conservation estimates that more than two billion gallons of sewage entered the Hudson River in 2018. Almost twenty million came from the city of Hudson.

For decades, the City of Hudson has replaced sections of stormwater and sewer piping to separate the two systems. The process is expensive—with some estimates close to one hundred million dollars—and includes digging up miles of roads and replacing miles of pipes. 

The grant will enable the city to create a long-term plan to complete the project and use the plan to guide future grant applications and project planning.

5/24/21

May 20,2021

Weekend Both Sides Parking

Weekend overnight parking on both sides of the street is allowed (unless otherwise posted). Alternate side parking remains in effect Monday through Friday. This policy is in effect until further notice.

Parking Guideline

Monday - Friday: 12:00 Midnight - 8:00 AM
On all streets within the City unless otherwise posted:
  • Park on the odd side for odd-numbered calendar dates.
  • Park on the even side for even-numbered calendar dates.

Note the time that alternate side regulation begins at 12:00 Midnight. If parking on the evening of May 20 to leave the car parked until the morning of May 21, park on the odd side of the street so that you comply May 21, 12-8 AM.

8:00 AM - Midnight: Unless otherwise posted, parking on both sides.

Saturday - Sunday:

Unless otherwise posted, parking on both sides. Both sides weekend policy continues until further notice.

More on Parking Regulations

This policy was issued by Police Commissioner Bower on May 19, 2021.


May 19,2021

Seasonal Streets

Earlier this year, the City of Hudson determined to support the Warren St. businesses in their post-pandemic economic recovery by providing the option to extend storefront operations into the parking lane. This coordinated effort, known as the Warren Street Seasonal Usage Program, is well underway, ready to be fully operational before Memorial Day.

Installation of the concrete barriers and planters on Warren Street is almost complete. The program is a learning experience, and refinements will continue. We encourage your comments and suggestions. Please contact the Project Manager for the Program, Gary Purnhagen at garypurnhagen@cityofhudson.org. Purnhagen is the point person for the Common Council and the Mayor’s office.

The City is providing planters and plants as part of the program. The City will also plant planters owned by individual businesses to help ensure a consistent look. Michael Conti, the owner of Grace Gardens, is contributing time and materials and will manage the completion of the planting. Last weekend, many volunteers, including members of Perfect Ten, helped work with Conti in preparing the City-owned planters.

Let us also thank the Hudson Department of Public Works as well as our neighboring towns. The task of bringing the barriers to Hudson and placing them has been paramount to the program.


There are a few businesses wanting to join the Program on a waitlist—the limiting factor being the availability of the barriers. If you would like to get on the waiting list, please contact Gary Purnhagen. We will do everything we can to address this. And in general, we will monitor, listen and respond to suggestions and concerns throughout the Seasonal Program.

5/19/21

May 18,2021

Report to Begin Decriminalizing Substance Use Disorders and Serious Mental Illness

Mayor Kamal Johnson releases report to begin decriminalizing substance use disorders and serious mental illness as part of his police reform pledge. 

Hudson Mayor Kamal Johnson will release the Sequential Intercept Model (SIM) mapping report of Columbia County at the Hudson Common Council Meeting on May 18. The Council meeting begins at 7:00 pm. The SIM report was created by the Transitions to Treatment Task Force composed of city, county, and nonprofit leaders convened by the Mayor in July 2020. The report identifies service and infrastructure gaps in the treatment and care of people living with substance use disorders (SUDs) and/or untreated serious mental illness.

Importantly, the report also includes recommendations to prevent people from cycling in and out of incarceration, homelessness, and hospitalization, a problem that is steadily increasing in Columbia County.

“As of May 6, 2021, Columbia County recorded 37 suspected overdoses, 5 of which were fatalities.  During the same period in 2020, the County had 23 suspected overdoses, 2 of which were fatal.  Overdoses are on the rise and involve people who live across the county, not just in Hudson, but many come to Hudson for services, help or to sit in our parks. Sadly, an estimated 40% of those who live with a Substance Use Disorder also live with mental illness,” said Mayor Johnson.

“We needed to get to the root of the problem and understand our service and infrastructure gaps in order to fix the problem.  This report is a first step to solving the problem and will require a partnership between the public and private sectors and the city and county governments,” he continued.

The Task Force’s work was facilitated by the Greenburger Center for Social and Criminal Justice which donated its services to the City’s efforts.  “The Greenburger Center was proud to work with Mayor Johnson on this report and we look forward to working with the City, County, and State to implement the report’s recommendations, particularly the proposed Wellness Hub. We are convinced that Columbia County can become a model for other upstate rural/suburban communities, all of whom are facing the same realities when it comes to substance use disorders or people living with serious, untreated mental illness,” said Francis Greenburger, founder of the Greenburger Center.

At the heart of the report’s recommendations is the creation of a Wellness Hub at a parcel soon to be donated to the Greenburger Center by A. Colarusso and Sons, located in Greenport, New York. The Wellness Hub will allow for the re-location of the approved PEOPLE, USA 20-bed DeTox Center onto the property and the development, over time, of needed services such as supportive housing.

Another important recommendation is the elimination of area motels as emergency housing to be replaced by supportive housing, including a 30-40 bed homeless shelter. “Everyone knows it’s a bad idea to place anyone, let alone someone who may have a mental illness with psychotic or delusional features, in a remote motel room without access to services or other people. It has harmed the very people we are trying to help, cost taxpayers hundreds of thousands of dollars, and not made our communities safer. This is not a county or city problem, we all own this problem and need to face the fact that using motels as homeless housing makes no sense,” said Johnson.

Finally, the report recommends the creation of a county mental health court and the eventual reuse of portions of the Columbia County Jail property or jail for the provision of more services for this population including probation or homeless services.

The next step to implementing these recommendations is for the City of Hudson and the Columbia County Board of Supervisors to form a Joint Task Force to develop an implementation plan for recommendations deemed feasible.

ABOUT THE REPORT

The Columbia County Sequential Intercept Model (SIM) mapping report was prepared by the Greenburger Center for Social and Criminal Justice at the request of City of Hudson Mayor Kamal Johnson. The report identifies infrastructure and service gaps in Columbia County, New York related to the treatment and care of people living with substance use disorders (SUDs) and/or untreated serious mental illness (“target population”). The report includes recommendations to prevent the target population from cycling in and out of incarceration, homelessness, and hospitalization.

To implement these recommendations, the report calls on the City of Hudson and the Columbia County Board of Supervisors to form a Joint Task Force to develop an implementation plan for recommendations deemed feasible.

Major service and infrastructure gaps identified include:

  • Short-term crisis stabilization beds (up to 24 hours) and crisis step-down services (e.g., 3-week stabilization residential step-down housing and access to other services, including acute day treatment programs)
  • Supportive and homeless housing, including permanent supportive housing for those living with mental illness or SUDs, temporary supportive housing including a homeless shelter for the homeless population, and post-crisis stabilization housing (up to 3 weeks
  • Acute day treatment and additional community clinic services
  • Re-entry services for people released from incarceration and those who are on probation or otherwise diverted from the criminal justice system pre-trial
  • Staff shortages and a lack of staff diversity
  • Lack of criminal court diversion options
  • Mental health counseling services for students
  • After-graduation transitional services for students graduating from high school with more serious forms of mental illness

Major recommendations include:

  • Development of short-term and step-down crisis services either associated with Columbia Memorial Hospital or the proposed Wellness Hub
  • Creation of a Wellness Hub on a donated land in Greenport, New York, to enable co-located services for the target population, including relocation of the proposed PEOPLE, USA 20 bed DeTox Center
  • Development of a 30-40 bed homeless shelter and elimination of motels for emergency housing, unless supportive services are located on-site
  • Restoration of counseling services to pre-pandemic levels in schools, the jail, and County Mental Health Clinic
  • Creation of a county mental health court to hear felony cases and a HUB court to allow for transfer of misdemeanor cases involving the target population from town and village courts to county court
  • More training for town and village judges and lawyers in DA and Public Defender offices
  • Repurposing a portion of the jail property or jail for supportive services for the target population



Sequential Intercept Model Report Factsheet
Sequential Intercept Model Report


5/18/21


May 07,2021 210218_Concept-web

Promenade Hill Park Construction

Construction begins on an extensive renovation project for Promenade Hill Park in Hudson to add ADA-accessible walkways, landscape improvements, and other amenities. The renovations will provide much-needed upgrades to this important public space to preserve its historic features while providing access to park amenities and extraordinary views of the Hudson and the Catskills for people of all abilities.

210218_Concept-web

Promenade Hill Park, which has been designated as a special park space in Hudson since 1795, will be getting significant upgrades. As part of the project, accessible, family-friendly open spaces for all abilities and ages will be incorporated. Improvements include:

  • Accessible access to the plaza, seating areas, water fountain, play area, parking lot, and upper promenade.
  • Redesigned open plaza, with open and flexible lawn areas.
  • Amphitheater stone seating blocks with views of the plaza and Warren Street.
  • Added cast iron and wood benches, including accessible seating.
  • Shade trees and native understory plantings.
  • Improved “whale” spray shower.
  • Play area improvements

The park will be closed to the public starting on May 10 as construction begins. Construction is being led by Colarusso and Son, Inc.

The overall cost of the project is estimated at around $2 million. $1.1 million is provided by a New York State Downtown Revitalization grant. In addition to the public funding, the project is also receiving support from private donors, with the H. van Ameringen Foundation contributing $650,000 and the Colarusso Family contributing $100,000. The estimated completion date for the project is January 31, 2022.

Hudson Mayor Kamal Johnson said, “We need to ensure more people can access our public parks. Residents have been demanding park improvements for years and it’s great to be moving forward on this. I appreciate everyone who has contributed to this project.”

"The Downtown Revitalization Initiative projects are helping to reinvigorate Hudson’s economy and expanding its possibilities to welcome residents and visitors,” said New York Secretary of State Rossana Rosado. “Safe and accessible public gathering spaces are the hallmark of a vibrant downtown and the renovated Promenade Hill Park will provide improved accessibility to the views and beauty of the Hudson River. The upgrades will leverage additional prospects for Hudson and create a more desirable place for residents, businesses, and visitors to enjoy for years to come." 

Senator Daphne Jordan said, “Adding ADA-accessible walkways, landscape improvements and other essential, family-friendly amenities – including more accessibility to plaza, seating areas, play area, parking lot, and upper promenade, a redesigned open plaza with open and flexible lawn areas, and Amphitheater stone seating blocks affording great views — for Promenade Hill Park in Hudson as part of this $2 million renovation project is welcome news for the community. Upgrading and preserving this valuable public space, while increasing access to park amenities and scenic views of the Hudson and Catskills, will further enhance the community’s special quality of life. I thank Secretary of State Rossana Rosado and the Department of State for advancing this important accessibility and improvement project.”

Assemblymember Didi Barrett said, “I was thrilled when New York State awarded the City of Hudson a $10 million Downtown Revitalization Initiative (DRI) Grant in 2017. The DRI’s implementation has been a tremendous asset to the City and I am very pleased to now see the $2 million renovation project at Promenade Hill Park move forward. Promenade Hill Park is a favorite scenic landmark, as well as a recreational and cultural hub for Hudson residents and visitors alike. This much-needed renovation will make it more accessible, sustainable and user-friendly, to be enjoyed by generations to come. I thank the Governor and his team for their leadership on this initiative, and the many active, engaged Hudson residents and leaders for helping make this happen.”

Starr Whitehouse Landscape Architects Gail Wittwer-Laird said, “The renovated lower plaza will offer a greener gathering area for the community at the terminus of Warren Street as well as provide a fitting accessible gateway to the historic promenade and its enchanting view of the Hudson River.”

The design for the project was led by Starr Whitehouse Landscape Architects and Proper and O’Leary Engineering with significant community input. The project was presented to the Historic Preservation Commission in December 2020 and January 2021. In January 2021, the State Historic Preservation Office and the Hudson Preservation Commission issued approval for the project. In addition, plans were presented to the Common Council in October 2020 and April 2021. 

To learn more about the Promenade Hill Park Improvements and the City of Hudson’s other DRI projects, go to: https://cityofhudson.org/business/DRI.php.


Apr 30,2021

Project Hudson

The Hudson Tourism Board has opened Project Hudson 2.0 to fund community-driven projects that contribute to the Hudson experience. This program is reserved for applicants from marginalized communities -- BIPOC, LatinX, Asian/Bangladeshi, LGBTQ+. Learn more

3 1 2

Apr 30,2021

The City of Hudson Announces $1.6 million-dollar additional funds

The City of Hudson has a $2.5 million-dollar unassigned fund balance, according to an April report from the City Treasurer. That’s $1.6 million more than the $900,000 estimate the Treasure gave in the prior month.

SAVING THROUGH SPENDING DECREASE

Significant savings were realized through spending decreases. Actual expenses were $1.0 million lower than budget, and significantly below forecast. In August of 2020, the Mayor asked all departments to create a spending reduction plan and issued an executive order that all expenditures $1000 or over had to be approved by the Board of Estimate and Apportionment (BEA). This led to savings beyond what the Treasurer’s office anticipated.

SALES TAX

Furthermore, the City’s sales tax revenue was greater than the April 12 report anticipated - by approximately $150,000. Studies have shown that cash assistance to people with low and moderate incomes stimulates the economy because people spend the money locally and immediately on essential services or use it to start small businesses. State and federal programs like increased unemployment assistance and stimulus checks added more money to the economy. Furthermore, the city started a universal basic income pilot program.

“Fourth quarter sales tax was the second highest on record, and is a good indicator of overall economic health,” says City Treasurer Heather Campbell.

The city also participated and led several programs to support businesses. This included the Shared Streets program, the Berkshire Continuity Fund, the Galvan MWBE Fund, and Tourism Board grants.

Prioritizing public health is also a key to a functioning economy. The city took consistent measures to reduce the spread of coronavirus and reduce its impacts on our community. This includes the Hudson Safe campaign and the distribution of essential supplies.

LODGING TAX

While the pandemic has reduced the tourism and hospitality economy, Hudson received more funds in lodging tax than previously anticipated. Ending the year strong with over $220,000 in lodging tax revenue. “It was extremely encouraging to see lodging tax rebound, since it also bodes well for local businesses” says Campbell.

FORECASTING

In addition, the previous report had a miscalculation where some allocations were counted twice, so that it appeared that less money was available than there really was.

ESSENTIAL SERVICES

Throughout the pandemic, the city sought to reduce expenses but prioritized critical services.

“Our employees provide essential services that our residents, businesses, and visitors need,” says Mayor Kamal Johnson. “Every department contributes to our city’s safety and prosperity. During the pandemic, we needed our employees more than ever.”

NO PROPERTY TAX INCREASE

Due to the financial burdens put on citizens in previous years, the city did not raise property taxes.

“Given the fiscal difficulties residents struggled with this past year, we avoided adding to their financial burden," says Common Council President Tom DePietro

FEDERAL AND STATE RELIEF

“The adjusted financials do not include any of our Federal or State Relief funds, the relief funds will make it possible to continue important projects and initiatives.”

The city anticipates additional Federal relief from the American Rescue Act of $667,000, payable over the next two years


Apr 29,2021 culvert-inlet

Culvert Inventory and Management Plan

Hudson completed a management plan that provides guidance on reducing flood impacts, improving aquatic connectivity, and enhancing the condition of its road-stream crossings. The management plan includes an assessment of the culverts and bridges in Hudson’s jurisdiction and prioritizes them for replacement based on flood risk, condition of the road-stream crossing, maintenance frequency, and potential for improving aquatic habitat. The City of Hudson received technical assistance from Cornell Cooperative Extension of Columbia and Greene Counties in conducting the assessment and production of the management plan.

The Culvert Management Plan provides the community with a complete inventory of its road-stream crossing assets, including structure quality, flood resilience, and access for fish and other aquatic organisms that need to move through the structure. Hudson can use this document as a long-term resource to plan for maintenance, upgrades, and replacement, as well as to apply for funding to support culvert right-sizing and repair.

culvert
Photos of culverts in the inventory


VIEW THE PLAN

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

Search Crossings and view map

ABOUT

Culverts and bridges convey stormwater and waterways beneath roads. Culverts play an important role in ensuring the safety and functionality of transportation systems and maintaining the connectivity of aquatic habitats. Because they are buried beneath the ground and do not appear on maps, the condition of culverts may be unknown by the jurisdiction responsible for their upkeep. If culverts and bridges are too small to convey the amount of water entering them during storms, they can contribute to flooding. If culverts are misaligned with a stream corridor or otherwise impeded, they can pose a barrier to the movement of fish and wildlife.

It is estimated that there are more than 20,000 culverts in the Hudson River Estuary watershed. Records on their location and condition are not commonly kept by the wide variety of jurisdictions that manage them, including local and county governments, New York State Department of Transportation and private landowners. To address flood risk from undersized culverts and to reconnect streams for ecosystem health and function, the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation Hudson River Estuary Program Culvert Prioritization Project and the New York State Water Resources Institute are working with Cornell Cooperative Extension and other partners to assist county and local governments in locating and assessing road-stream crossings and creating plans for the long-term management of culverts and bridges. Should provide a link or invitation to the culvert project website

Field-based assessments of culverts and bridges were completed using protocols developed by the North Atlantic Aquatic Connectivity Collaborative (NAACC). Culverts were mapped, measured, and assessed for condition and orientation to adjacent waterways. Data were uploaded to the NAACC database and shared with staff at Cornell University for further analysis.

The inventory data is used by NYS Water Resources Institute and partners to analyze current and future flood risk posed by roadway infrastructure. They developed and maintain a culvert capacity model that estimates the land area contributing water to a particular culvert, determines current and future high flows using precipitation predictions up to the year 2050, and then compares flows to the culvert capacity to estimate the maximum storm event that the culvert can pass without flooding.

The project was initiated by Mayor Johnson’s Climate Smart Task Force. Cornell Cooperative Extension (CCE) provided services to Hudson through their participation in the Climate Resilience Partnership. The Climate Resilience Partnership is a collaboration between Cornell Cooperative Extension associations in the Hudson Valley, with financial and technical assistance from the Hudson River Estuary Program and the New York State Water Resources Institute. The Partnership aims to build long-term resilience to extreme weather and climate change in the Hudson River Estuary watershed. The partnership provides assistance and resources to local communities in Columbia, Dutchess, Greene, Rensselaer, Rockland, and Ulster counties.

New York State Water Resources Institute, based at Cornell University, has a mission to advance water resource management and address critical water resource problems in New York State and across the nation. NYS Water Resources Institute builds towards this mission by leveraging unique access to scientific and technical resources at Cornell University and in collaboration with partners to improve communications and networks for promoting water literacy and management. The North Atlantic Aquatic Connectivity Consortium is a network of universities, conservation organizations, and governmental agencies focused on improving aquatic connectivity across a thirteen-state region, from Maine to West Virginia.

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation’s Hudson River Estuary Program helps people enjoy, protect, and revitalize the Hudson River and its valley. Created in 1987 through the Hudson River Estuary Management Act, the program focuses on the tidal Hudson and adjacent watershed from the federal dam at Troy to the Verrazano Narrows in New York City.


4/29/21


Apr 27,2021

Truck Route Survey #2 Results

As part of the City of Hudson Truck Route Traffic Feasibility Study, an online survey for the Hudson Truck Study was developed to gather public input about proposed truck route alternatives through the City of Hudson. The survey began with an overview of the project and an explanation of the purpose of the survey. Then, the survey presented an overview of proposed truck route alternatives being considered, including a map to illustrate each proposed alternative and a list of pros and cons of each alternative. Following the proposed alternative descriptions, a series of questions were asked to gather input to help identify a preferred alternative. In total, 276 people shared their views of the proposed alternate truck routes.



ABOUT THE PROJECT

The City of Hudson is working with MJ Engineering & Land Surveying, P.C. (MJ) to perform a destination and origin study for trucks traveling through Hudson. New York State truck drivers support their families and supply Hudson and surrounding communities with crucial goods; however, the route they traverse was designed for a previous era. The study collects data and proposes improved routes that ensure the safety of the community, truck drivers, and businesses alike.

“While we are thankful for hardworking truck drivers who support businesses by bringing supplies into and out of our communities,” says Mayor Kamal Johnson. “This study will help create a new solution that puts trucks where they can operate most effectively and safely: on routes that do not traverse dense residential neighborhoods."

Based on traffic data collection, public comment, and roadway characteristics, MJ has identified 12 alternate routes along with the benefits, disadvantages, and planning needs of each proposed route change. Out of those 12 possible routes, MJ has further identified 5 select routes to be the most viable and consistent with the project objectives and goals of ensuring the safety of the community, truck drivers, and businesses alike. This proposal will be further refined based on survey results and input at the April 27 public meeting.

Learn more about the Truck Study

4/27/21

Apr 21,2021 sidewalk report

Report: Sidewalk Accessibility

The City of Hudson has completed auditing sidewalk accessibility. The City of Hudson hired architectural firm Hyman Hayes Associates (HHA) to measure and report on sidewalks between key areas of service in the City of Hudson.

“Everyone deserves access to city services,” says Mayor Kamal Johnson. “To make our services accessible, the sidewalks need to be accessible.”

sidewalk report
The report identfies accessibility barriers

The sidewalk audit reviews sidewalks between Henry Hudson Riverfront Park, Promenade Hill Park, City Hall, the Youth Center, the Senior Center, Oakdale Park, the Central Fire Station, and the Police Station. The audit reports on sidewalk and curb ramp barriers and  lists the location of the barrier, the barrier, and how the barrier is not in compliance with ADA standards.

The 270-page reports on hundreds of compliance issues. Issues are identified on aerial maps and drone footage. Each item on a map is paired with an item in a chart that includes location description, compliance issue, the ADA reference code, and additional comments. In addition, there are photographs and close-ups. 

Specific tools were used by the project team to assess conditions and determine compliance with ADA. The tools include:

  1. A self-calibrating, four-foot level with a digital display
  2. An ADA compliance guide
  3. Digital pull scale
  4. Tape measure

Surface slope measurements were evaluated as follows:

  1. Accessible Routes – slope measurements were taken at 20’ max intervals
  2. Ramps – slope measurements were taken at landings, top, bottom, middle (several if
    needed)
  3. Parking Spaces – slope measurements were taken along both sides at the top, middle, and bottom

ADA report map
A map from the report

“I’m happy to be contributing to our community and advancing this important accessibility project,” says City of Hudson Public Works Commissioner Peter Bujanow, who is managing the project. “This audit will help us understand and address the barriers so that people of all abilities can access City facilities and parks with ease, feel welcomed and included to participate in programs and services, and travel freely and safely at intersections throughout the City.”

“This is an important step to making Hudson a more equitable city,” says Mayoral Aide and ADA Coordinator Michael Chameides.

"During our work, we got to know Hudson well and became captivated by its culture, history, and community," says Dave Loucks, Managing Principal of HHA. "We’re so excited to be a part of the efforts to improve accessibility in the City of Hudson so that everyone can enjoy this charming city."

The sidewalk audit project area was determined by an October 2019 settlement agreement between the United States Department of Justice and the City of Hudson. In addition to the audit, residents can also report ADA barriers.

Now that the audit is complete and barriers have been identified, the City of Hudson will create a plan for sidewalk ADA compliance. Property owners are responsible for maintaining accessible sidewalks and curb ramps. The City of Hudson Common Council is also exploring alternative solutions to improve sidewalks.

The sidewalk audit is one of several active projects to improve street accessibility and safety, including Promenade Hill Park redesign, Hudson Connects street improvements, Empire State Trail, Dugway, new crosswalk signals, new crosswalks, Ferry Street bridge construction, Truck Route study, and improvements at the intersection of Green and Fairview.

About HHA

Founded in 1992, HHA provides architecture, interior design, and structural engineering services to healthcare, government, and higher education clients. We are recognized for our hands-on approach by our principals and responsive client service to develop and maintain long-lasting relationships.

 

Learn more about City of Hudson ADA


Apr 21,2021

Request for Proposals - Insurance

The City of Hudson is requesting proposals from qualified insurance brokers interested in serving as the City’s insurance and risk management advisor and insurance broker.

The City invites all qualified brokers with prior demonstrative experience in providing insurance brokerage services to government entities that include, but are not limited to, risk exposure analysis, insurance placement and servicing, claims assistance, claims reporting and general advice, to submit a proposal for the City’s consideration.


Apr 20,2021

Request for Proposals - Commercial Use of Dock

The City of Hudson is requesting proposals from a business or non-profit organization to moor at the City of Hudson dock space for an operation of commercial, charitable, or educational use.

Deadline for RFP Questions: 04/26/2021 (5:00PM)
Proposal Due Date 05/04/2020 (5:00PM)

The City of Hudson is seeking a creative charter services company that best demonstrates the ability to safely utilize the commercial dock while providing affordable and reliable products and services to tourists and City of Hudson residents, while paying a reasonable fee to the City of Hudson. TEach proposal must clearly identify the intended use and the amount of space needed for operations.



4/20/21

Apr 19,2021

Get Your Covid-19 Vaccine

Do your part and get vaccinated. Protect yourself, your family, and our community by getting the Covid vaccine. The Covid-19 vaccine has been carefully tested and monitored. As of April 2021, over 24 thousand Columbia County residents have received their first dose as well as over 70 million Americans. The vaccine is proven to reduce the spread of coronavirus.

For more information and to schedule an appointment, visit the Columbia County Health Department or call the Columbia County Vaccine Hotline at 518-697-5560. Hudson residents are also invited to contact the Mayor's Office for support in scheduling an appointment.

Michael Chameides
mayoralaide@cityofhudson.org
518-828-7217

covid - fb

4/19/2021

Apr 16,2021

Dugway Trail Improvements

5/27/2021 UPDATE

The City of Hudson is partnering with the Hudson River Valley Greenway (HVRG), a New York State agency, to make improvements to the Dugway trail.

HRVG will rehabilitate the one-quarter mile Dugway trail, a walking and bicycling path which connects Harry Howard Avenue and Mill Street. The Dugway trail is also part of the Empire State Trail and is adjacent to the recently completed shared path improvements on Harry Howard Avenue. The Dugway Trail is also adjacent to Charles Williams Park and in close proximity to the dog park. HRVG is undertaking the project with state funds from the Empire State Trail program.

“We need to expand access to our public parks,” says Mayor Kamal Johnson. “This project improves our infrastructure, reduces municipal costs, and will make it easier for people of all abilities to enjoy our city.”

The project will remove the Dugway trail’s aging surface, reconstruct the path’s gravel subbase as needed, and install a new 10-foot wide paved trail. New signage and trail entrance features will be installed to bring the trail up to current safety and accessibility standards. When completed, the improved trail will welcome bicyclists, walkers, and runners of all ages and abilities.

The project is scheduled to be completed by May 31. The week of April 19, the trail closed to the public to allow for construction.

Information about the Empire State Trail, including detailed trail descriptions and an online map depicting the trail route, designated parking areas, and nearby attractions is available on the project website: https://empiretrail.ny.gov.

4/16/2021


Apr 15,2021

Truck Study - Public Meeting

City of Hudson To Hold Second Public Meeting on Truck Traffic Route Feasibility Study

The City of Hudson invites community members and stakeholders to participate in a virtual public meeting regarding the City of Hudson Truck Traffic Route Feasibility Study. The event will take place on Tuesday, April 27, 2021 at 6:00 PM via Zoom Webinar. Registration is required for the event.

The purpose of the virtual meeting is twofold: To present the research and get public input. The City’s consultant team will provide a project overview and present the proposed truck route alternatives under consideration. Also, the public will be invited to provide input on proposed alternate routes, as well as how nearby communities may be impacted by possible route changes via participant polls and, at the end of the presentation, a question and answer session.

The City of Hudson is conducting this Truck Route Traffic Feasibility Study to propose improved routes that ensure the safety of community, truck drivers, and businesses alike. Indeed, while New York State truck drivers support their families and supply Hudson and surrounding communities with crucial goods, the route they traverse was designed for a previous era. Using the study, the City of Hudson will then work with surrounding towns, Columbia County, New York State, and a variety of stakeholders to help make sure that the new route improves outcomes for all. The study will measure and report truck traffic through the city, inclusive of the origin, destination and volume of truck traffic. Supplementing the origin and destination study will be an assessment of the environmental (public health), physical (infrastructure degradation) and social (neighborhoods and residents) effects of truck traffic.

The city is also conducting a public survey, which ends on April 20, 2021. Read more about the project.

The planning process is being guided by the City of Hudson and facilitated by a consultant team led by M.J. Engineering and Land Surveying, P.C. (MJ) of Clifton Park.

4/15/21

Apr 08,2021 Flood Map

Hudson Issues Flood Preparedness Guide

The City of Hudson recently completed a flood preparedness guide. The document provides a checklist for residents to prepare for floods as well as what do to during and after a flood. The guide also includes a 100-year flood map and links to additional resources.

View the Guide

The publication was prepared by Cornell Cooperative Extension of Columbia and Greene Counties for NYS Water Resources Institute and the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation Hudson River Estuary Program, with support from the NYS Environmental Protection Fund. The project was initiated by Mayor Johnson’s Climate Smart Task Force.

Apr 06,2021

Financing for Energy Upgrades

Commercial and non-profit building owners can now apply for financing to make energy upgrades to their buildings. The City of Hudson is partnering with the Energy Improvement Corporation to offer the OPEN C-PACE program. 

Energy efficiency and renewable energy improvements can help building owners achieve:
  • Improved, high-performing properties
  • Lower operating expenses
  • Positive impacts on communities through reduced greenhouse gas emissions
Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing with repayment secured through a benefit assessment lien on the improved property. Open C-PACE paves the way for higher levels of energy efficiency or renewable energy to be included as part of a building’s redevelopment or rehabilitation.

Eligible projects include solar PV, solar thermal, ground and air source heat pumps, lighting improvements, HVAC, insulation, chillers, windows, pumps, and smart controls. 

“Climate change will have devastating impacts and our community must do our part to reduce greenhouse gas emissions,” says Mayor Kamal Johnson. “I’m happy to offer this program to reduce emissions and save property owners money.”

EIC NY Open C-PACE differs from traditional bank loans

  • Financing is available for up to 100% of the project cost or can be combined with other financing
  • Competitive private financing from EIC-approved capital providers
  • Customizable loan terms up to the expected life of the improvement(s) (generally 20-30 years) 
  • Benefit assessment lien is subordinate to municipal taxes and senior to other liens (consent from mortgage holder is required)
  • Automatically transfers to new owner upon sale of property
  • Available for energy efficiency and renewable energy measures (Projects are qualified according to NYSERDA’s C-PACE Guidelines)
  • PACE can be included in a project’s capital stack to reduce the need for higher-cost financing, lowering the weighted average cost of capital needed for the project

Getting started

Open C-PACE is a competitive, open-market PACE program

  • EIC provides property owners with a list of approved capital providers who are experienced in providing PACE financing in a range of project types and offer additional services such as project governance and engineering. We encourage you to reach out to multiple capital providers on the list to find the best match for your project. 
  • The capital provider can work with you to obtain an energy audit and determine the scope of work for your project, and then prepares the transaction documents on your behalf and submits them to EIC for approval. 
  • EIC reviews the transaction documents and confirms that the project complies with NYSERDA’s Commercial PACE Guidelines.
  • Once you enter a Finance Agreement with your capital provider, EIC records the benefit assessment lien which secures repayment of the financing. EIC will handle all billing directly with you going forward
To learn more and for a simple application form, visit eicpace.org or call (914) 302-7300 x8114

Mayor Johnson’s Climate Smart Task Force initiated the project. In reviewing past projects and opportunities for additional savings, the task force identified that the city had initiated a previous iteration of the PACE program which put the loan on the property tax bill and relied on the municipality guaranteeing the payment.

4/6/2021

Apr 06,2021

Seeking Project Manager for Warren Street Seasonal Usage spring/summer 2021

The City of Hudson seeks a qualified individual or firm to contract with the City to act as the Project Manager of Warren Street Seasonal Usage 2021. For individuals, a cover letter plus resume and for firms, a cover letter plus portfolio of similar projects, must be received by kate.treacy@cityofhudson.org and tamar.adler@cityofhudson.org by April 16, 2021 at 5 pm. This is a part-time contract job.

Project Description

The Warren Street Seasonal Usage 2021 Program (Program) entails helping businesses on Warren Street expand into parking spaces in front of their businesses to increase dining and retail opportunities during the COVID-19 pandemic, and guiding the activation of Warren Street pocket parks for businesses and organizations without Warren Street brick and mortar locations, with the goal of expanding equity and inclusion.

Project Manager Responsibilities 

The Responsibilities of the Project Manager can be found here. Please note that it is a part-time contract position. 

Project Duration

The Project will last from May-October 2021.

Project Compensation

Compensation for the role is $15,000.


4/6/2021


Apr 05,2021

Hudson Pursues Affordable Housing Development Plan With Anti-Displacement Funds

Pattern for Progress hired to study developable properties, funding, and feasibility for stable, affordable housing 

The City of Hudson is partnering with Hudson Valley Pattern for Progress to create an Affordable Housing Development Plan (AHDP), a concrete pipeline of publicly and privately funded housing development projects. Building on the results of previous housing studies, Pattern for Progress will study developable properties, funding opportunities, and site feasibility, in order to create a plan for the operations, timeline, and partnerships necessary to develop affordable housing in Hudson. The Hudson Housing Authority and the Hudson Community Development & Planning Agency are funding partners for the plan.
 

Many Hudson residents cite challenges in finding affordable housing as a key driver of the displacement of Hudson’s historically Black neighborhoods and low- and moderate-income households. Multiple studies support this experience, including a 2012 City of Hudson study, the 2017 Housing Needs Assessment of Columbia County, and the 2018 Strategic Housing Action Plan. Community members on the frontline of displacement have been and will continue to be integral to the planning process. Impacted residents served on the Anti-Displacement Learning Network team, which secured funding for the AHDP. The learning network team also conducted interviews with residents at risk of displacement and with staff at organizations that provide housing services. Members of the team will serve on the AHDP advisory committee. The development planning process will also include public meetings with directly impacted communities.

“Too many of our residents are struggling with housing in Hudson,” says Mayor Kamal Johnson. “Creating an affordable housing development plan is an important step to meet Hudson’s housing needs.”

The project includes data collection, analysis, and evaluation of potential development sites. Pattern and the AHDP advisory committee will work in conjunction to prioritize sites for development. Then Pattern will create a development plan and the city will issue requests for proposals from developers. The anticipated completion date of the AHDP is November 2021. The long-term vision for implementing the plan aims to secure funding from the NYS Division of Housing and Community Renewal for new affordable housing developments.

“Pattern is looking forward to its continued involvement and working with the City of Hudson,” says Pattern Senior Vice President Joe Czajka. “Increasing the supply of a range of housing options is vital to the overall health of the City. Specifically, affordable housing is in short supply. On a countywide basis—the median price of a single family home has increased by 20% since February of 2020 to over $350,000, while the number of homes on the market has declined by 40%. These market dynamics are occurring throughout the Hudson Valley region and it is clearly having an impact on the residents of all communities.”

“We need to develop more affordable housing so we can help our neighbors stay in the community,” says Mayoral Aide and Columbia County Supervisor Michael Chameides. “This development plan is a key step to starting successful projects that meet a variety of needs.”


First Ward Alderperson Rebecca Wolff says: "The City of Hudson neglected to take crucial steps over the past several decades to prevent the housing affordability crisis we are now experiencing. This plan is essential in taking the steps that are left to us."

"The City of Hudson Strategic Housing Action Plan calls for the creation of a range of different housing options, including affordable, market rate, senior and supportive housing,” says Dan Kent of Galvan Foundation. “The Affordable Housing Development Plan creates a concrete plan for where, when, and how these various types of housing will be built. We applaud the City of Hudson in taking this urgent next step of bringing the Strategic Housing Action Plan to life."


Betsy Gramkow, co-chair and treasurer of HCDPA, noted that, “It is a pleasure to work with City officials, HHA and Pattern for Progress to start developing a strategic plan that addresses issues of housing security and affordability for the residents of Hudson. The ADLN grant award is a great first step.”

The cost of the planning process is $30,000, supported in part by anti-displacement grant recently awarded to the City of Hudson by Enterprise Community Partners, Inc. (Enterprise), in partnership with the New York State Attorney General. Hudson was one of ten cities participating in the New York State Anti-Displacement Learning Network. Since the Network’s launch in January 2020, state officials, leaders, and nonprofit partners have worked collaboratively with local stakeholders to identify particular triggers of displacement in communities of color and design targeted approaches to address them. The awarded applicants demonstrated an understanding of local causes of displacement, a history of collaborating, and a commitment to preserving and stabilizing neighborhoods facing high rates of displacement. Hudson will now implement these high-impact strategies locally with plans aiming to preserve community stabilization and allow residents to remain in their homes.  

The Hudson grant application was led by Council Members Rebecca Wolff and Calvin Lewis, Mayor Kamal Johnson, County Supervisor and Mayoral Aide Michael Chameides, Greater Hudson Promise Neighborhood service provider Serria McGriff, Columbia County Sanctuary Movement Organizer Luisa Thillet, and Galvan Foundation Vice President of Initiatives Dan Kent.


In addition to the AHDP, the grant funds Hudson Roots, a new partnership with St. Catherine’s Center for Children to provide emergency rent-relief and optional case management to Hudson residents at immediate risk of displacement, but who might not otherwise qualify for assistance.

The grant will also fund a new staff position to manage the grant, expand outreach to people of color at risk of displacement, increase coordination between organizations that provide housing services, and carry out the goals of Hudson’s Strategic Housing Action Plan (SHAP). The SHAP identified creating a housing-focused staff position as a top priority action.  

The bulk of the grant is reserved to seed a Housing Trust Fund for future anti-displacement projects. The Housing Trust Fund will be created this year and will include spending criteria, governance structure, and strategic planning.


About Hudson Valley Pattern for Progress 

Hudson Valley Pattern for Progress is a not-for-profit public policy, planning, advocacy, and research organization. The mission of the organization is to promote regional, balanced, and sustainable solutions that enhance the growth and vitality of the Hudson Valley. Pattern works to create regional solutions to quality-of-life issues by bringing together business, nonprofit, academic and government leaders from across nine counties to collaborate on regional approaches to affordable/workforce housing, municipal sharing and local government efficiency, land use policy, transportation and other infrastructure issues that most impact the growth and vitality of the regional economy.


Mar 30,2021

H. van Ameringen Foundation to support Promenade Hill Park Improvements

The H. van Ameringen Foundation has committed to donate $650,000 to the city of Hudson to support improvements at Promenade Hill Park. The funds will help cover the costs for significant park upgrades including ADA-accessible walkways, landscape improvements, a new spray shower, and a redesigned lower plaza.

“Thank you to H. van Ameringen Foundation for the generous support to this important and ambitious project,” says Mayor Kamal Johnson. “Promenade Hill Park will be an accessible park for all to enjoy.”

The gift is in memory of H. van Ameringen, who lived in Hudson and New York City for the past 19 years. Henry was a businessman, real estate developer, philanthropist, advocate for LGBTQ rights, and marijuana legalization. He died in September of 2020 at the age of 89. 

“Henry was caring, compassionate, filled with knowledge, and easy to have a good long chat with,” says Rick Scalera, 5th Ward Supervisor and former Hudson Mayor. “Henry had a history of helping many programs and individuals in over many years in Hudson.”

“The Promenade Hill Park project is exactly the kind of project Henry would have been proud to contribute to—giving people of all walks of life especially those with disabilities and, of course, Mom's with carriages, the opportunity to enjoy the beautiful and breathtaking views of the Hudson River.”

The Promenade Hill Park renovation is largely funded by a Downtown Revitalization Initiative grant from New York State to the City of Hudson. The grant allocates $1.1 million to the park improvements. The designs were led by Starr Whitehouse Landscape Architects and Proper and O’Leary Engineering with significant community input over the past year. 

The park (prior to construction) is not fully accessible and does not meet the standards of the Americans with Disabilities Act. The redesigned park would provide an accessible route between the parking lot, street, viewing area at the upper promenade, and playground. In addition, it would provide an accessible drinking fountain.

210218_Concept-web

Construction bids for the project were opened on March 15, 2021. All three bids were significantly over budget and the city and design team began reviewing options of scaling down the project to fit within the budget. Some budget-cutting options included replacing materials of the granite sett plaza, bluestone paver bands, and limestone plaza border. Other considerations were the removal of stone block benches and landscape boulders and the replacement of the spray loop shower with a ground spray. The newly committed gift from the H. van Ameringen Foundation will help make up the difference of the budget shortfall and enable the city to move forward with the project with the amenities. 

“I know Henry would have been very disappointed with a scaled-back project and with the help of his foundation's funding it will indeed be ‘A crowned jewel entrance!’,” says Scalera.

Mar 25,2021

Montgomery Street Discontinuance


PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the City of Hudson Common Council will decide on April 20, 2021, whether to discontinue the use of approximately ninety (90) feet of the northern end of Montgomery Street in the City of Hudson. If the Common Council discontinues the street it is the intention of the City to sell the discontinued street to the adjoining property owner at fair market value.  The Common Council will hear verbal comments at the Informal Council Meeting on April 12, 2021 and will accept written comments until April 16, 2021.  A map of the area of proposed discontinuance is available on the City of Hudson website at www.cityofhudson.org. Written comments may be submitted to Tracy Delaney, City Clerk  cityclerk@cityofhudson.org

Arial View of Subject Property
Survey Map
Survey Map with Subject Property Indicated



Mar 25,2021

Truck Study and Survey

Give your input on proposed alternate routes for trucks that do not have destinations within the City of Hudson by taking the survey below. The survey ends on April 20, 2021



The City of Hudson is working with MJ Engineering & Land Surveying, P.C. (MJ) to perform a destination and origin study for trucks traveling through Hudson. New York State truck drivers support their families and supply Hudson and surrounding communities with crucial goods; however, the route they traverse was designed for a previous era. The study collects data and proposes improved routes that ensure the safety of the community, truck drivers, and businesses alike.
 
“While we are thankful for hardworking truck drivers who support businesses by bringing supplies into and out of our communities,” says Mayor Kamal Johnson, “This study will help create a new solution that puts trucks where they can operate most effectively and safely: On routes that do not traverse dense residential neighborhoods."

Based on traffic data collection, public comment, and roadway characteristics, MJ has identified 12 alternate routes along with the benefits, disadvantages, and planning needs of each proposed route change. Out of those 12 possible routes, MJ has further identified 5 select routes to be the most viable and consistent with the project objectives and goals of ensuring the safety of the community, truck drivers, and businesses alike. This proposal will be further refined based on survey results and input at the April 27 public meeting. Please be sure to attend, your input matters in this process.

Draft Truck Study
Draft Appendix

Learn more about the Truck Study

Mar 12,2021

Hudson Receives Grant for Oakdale Trail Sign

City of Hudson Youth Department, Friends of Oakdale Lake, Friends of Hudson Youth, and Columbia Land Conservancy to Collaborate on Interpretive Trail Sign

The Columbia Land Conservancy (CLC) announced that Hudson is one of six municipalities to be awarded a $500 grant through its first-ever municipal grant program. 

The grant will help fund an interpretative trail sign at Oakdale Lake. The sign will help direct visitors to Oakdale to enjoy the nature trail that circles the lake. The trail includes a forested walk with varying vantage points to view the lake. 

oakdale-trail

“This trail is one of Hudson’s hidden gems, and Friends of Hudson Youth is excited to collaborate in making it more accessible to our community,” said Peter Frank, Board member of Friends of Hudson Youth. 

The City of Hudson Youth Department, Friends of Oakdale Lake, Friends of Hudson Youth will collaborate on creating a map and text that describes the trail features and then creating and installing the sign. Friends of Oakdale Lake and Friends of Hudson Youth will contribute to the project to cover additional costs beyond the grant. 

“This is wonderful news,” Commissioner of Youth Maija Reed commented on the grant announcement.  “Hudson’s Oakdale Lake Park will truly benefit by the addition of signage, both in welcoming the community and in inviting exploration and understanding of this precious natural resource within our urban landscape."

In recent years, there has been significant trail maintenance and improvements, including the construction of a platform at the southern end of the lake.

“We are overjoyed at each step we are able to take toward investment in and attention to Oakdale Lake and Park, and treasure collaboration with the City of Hudson, Friends of Hudson Youth, and the CLC,” said Tamar Adler, founder Friends of Oakdale Lake. 

Oakdale Lake also features a beach, swimming (when lifeguards are present), basketball courts, skate park, playground, bike fix-it station, picnic tables, and pavilion. Friends of Oakdale Lake, the City of Hudson Youth Department, and CLC are also collaborating on a citizen science water quality project

The trial sign project is one of many public park and greenspace improvements including Promenade Hill Park and Urban Forestry. 

CLC also awarded grants to the Towns of Livingston, Hillsdale, Ancram, Gallatin, and Clermont.

“We were so impressed by the variety and creativity in these projects,” says Rebecca Walker, CLC’s Communications and Grants Manager. “Residents who live in these communities will benefit from the hard work of these municipalities.”     

“Supporting municipal partners with grants like these was identified as a priority in CLC’s recent Strategic Plan,” says Robin Andrews Vice-Chair of the Board of Trustees. “We are excited to help support our local governmental entities working to advance conservation goals on behalf of all of Columbia County.”

Mar 10,2021

2021 Street Space Survey


The City of Hudson Tourism Board, in conjunction with the Mayor’s office, is developing an evolved plan to help businesses extend into the public street space safely, while allowing residents and visitors to practice physical distancing in the upcoming 2021 Spring/Summer/Fall season. We would like your feedback on how you would like to use street space:

Resident Street Space Survey
Business Street Space Survey
Business Street Space Survey #2 W/QR


Mar 10,2021 youth-center-food-distribution-web

Hudson Receives Grant for Food Program

The city of Hudson is receiving $8,366 for its 2020 Youth Center Community Food Distribution Program. Responding to needs during the coronavirus pandemic, the community food program provided residents with reliable access to healthy food. The grant is from the New York State Office of Children and Family Services, distributed through the Columbia County Board of Supervisors and Columbia County Youth Bureau.

youth-center-food-distribution-web

The pandemic led to increased unemployment, especially for low-income workers. School closings exacerbated food insecurity because many of Hudson’s young people have depended on school for breakfast and lunch.

The City of Hudson responded by developing a food distribution program that served over 500 people twice a week. The Youth Center designed and managed the program to best meet the needs of residents. 

The program also served as an important link between the Youth Center and residents. It was an opportunity to strengthen relationships, support each other, and problem solve. It also served to distribute hand sanitizer and masks as well as share information about coronavirus, resources, upcoming activities, and ways to get involved.

"When people are struggling we need to pull together to help each other," says Mayor Kamal Johnson. "Thank you to everyone who made this program possible: the Youth Center staff,
Friends of Hudson Youth, volunteers, numerous donors and supporters, Columbia County, and New York State."

The grant reimburses some of the expenses for the program incurred from March to July 2020. Most of the food costs were covered through private donations raised through Friends of Hudson Youth.

Learn more Hudson's economic support programs.


Mar 09,2021

K.I.S.S. - Keeping Identities of Seniors Safe


Date:  03/15/2021 - 03/26/2021
Time:  Monday - Friday, 8:30am - 5:00pm
Location:  Hudson City Hall
                 520 Warren Street
                 Hudson, NY 12534
(BY APPOINTMENT ONLY.  Please call 518-828-1030 to schedule an appointment.)

The Columbia County KISS Program is once again available to seniors in every town in Columbia County.  The KISS Program, founded by Columbia County Clerk Holly Tanner, stands for Keeping Identities of Seniors Safe.  It was designed to protect the identities of our seniors while assisting them in them in the shredding of their sensitive materials.  Seniors are encouraged to contact their local town hall for hours of operation and more information on the program.  Justin Weaver, Columbia County Clerk's Records Services Manager, is overseeing the program and can also be contacted with any questions at 518-822-0143.

For Additional information click here.

To view the Items Retention Guideline and Disposal list click here.

Mar 09,2021

Drinking Water Quality Report

The city of Hudson has released a drinking water quality report for 2020. Last year, your drinking water met all State drinking water health standards and had no violations. The report provides a snapshot of last year’s water quality. It includes details about where your water comes from, what it contains, and how it compares to New York State standards. Our goal is to provide you a safe and dependable supply of drinking water. We want you to understand the efforts we make to continually improve the water treatment process and to protect our water resources.

New York State has adopted the first in the nation drinking water standard for 1,4-Dioxane along with one of the lowest maximum contaminant levels for PFOA and PFOS. Public Water Supplies in NYS are required to test for PFOA, PFOS, and 1,4-Dioxane. PFOA and PFOS have Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCL) of 10 parts per trillion each while 1,4-Diosane has an MCL of 1.0 parts per billion. The City of Hudson Water Department has completed its 1st quarter monitoring with no detects for PFOA, PFOS, and 1,4-Dioxane.

In 2021 the City of Hudson has one new main installation scheduled: the existing 4-inch cast iron water main on Washington Street between N 5th Street and N 6th Street will be replaced with new 12-inch ductile iron. The replacement of the older existing main and lead water services is a continuation of the city’s water main replacement project.

Read the report

Mar 09,2021

State of the Community

Mayor Kamal Johnson will host an event on March 17, 2021 at 6 PM Speakers include Senator Kirsten Gillibrand, Congressmember Antonio Delgado, Assemblymember Didi Barret, and Hudson City School District Superintendent Maria Suttmeier.

2021-03-17-event flyer

Mar 09,2021 210218_Concept-web

Promenade Hill Park Improvements Begin

Promenade Hill Park is getting a significant upgrade including ADA-accessible walkways, landscape improvements, a new spray shower, and a redesigned lower plaza. The designs were led by Starr Whitehouse Landscape Architects and Proper and O’Leary Engineering with significant community input.

210218_Concept-web

The city of Hudson has begun preparing the site for construction and has removed trees and benches. The city of Hudson is currently seeking bids for construction which are due March 15, 2021. Construction is scheduled to be complete in December 2021. The project is largely funded by a Downtown Revitalization Initiative grant from New York State.


Mar 08,2021

Hudson Launching Anti-Displacement Housing Assistance Fund

In Partnership with St. Catherine’s Center for Children and Columbia County Department of Social Services 

Rental assistance is available for low-income residents at risk of immediate displacement who may not otherwise qualify for existing emergency funding.

Hudson, NY: The City of Hudson and the Hudson Community Development and Planning Agency (HCDPA) are launching an emergency housing assistance program named Hudson Roots, providing rapid-release funds for low-income Hudson residents at immediate risk of displacement. Hudson Roots is made possible through a new partnership with St. Catherine’s Center for Children (St. Catherine’s), and funded by an anti-displacement grant recently awarded to the City of Hudson and HCDPA. Alongside other strategies to address the root causes of Hudson’s displacement crisis in the long term, Hudson Roots responds to the immediate impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on low-income residents by providing rental assistance. 

Hudson Roots will support Hudson residents with funds for back rent, 1st months rent, security deposits, and rental subsidies, along with optional case management and advocacy support for residents to seek and secure affordable housing. Those eligible for assistance are (1) City of Hudson residents (2) with an annual income at or below 80% of the area median income (AMI), (3) who are unable to access assistance through other means, and (4) who are at risk of imminent displacement due to income loss, rent increases, building sale, utility debts, or other expense increases, such as medical expenses. In Hudson, 80% AMI means a four-person household earning $65,050 or less annually, a 1 person household earning $45,550 or less annually, with other adjustments for household size. 

To apply, contact Dave Healy at St. Catherine’s Center for Children via phone at (518) 728-7239, or email dhealy@st-cath.org.

"We are proud to partner with the City of Hudson and Columbia County Department of Social Services in this effort to support residents of Hudson who are at-risk of losing their homes," said Frank Pindiak, executive director of St. Catherine's Center for Children. "Hudson Roots is a welcome approach to the issue of housing displacement for residents of Hudson who may not have other alternatives. We look forward to this collaboration, and congratulate the City of Hudson and their partners for their strategic vision that took Hudson Roots from planning to reality."

care a van St. Catherine's Care-A-Van provides mobile services 

Many Hudson residents at risk of displacement can’t access already existing emergency funds because of the eligibility requirements. Often, living in market-rate housing or paying above 30% of one’s income for housing will make residents ineligible for housing assistance programs. Hudson Roots makes emergency funds available for renters who wouldn’t otherwise qualify. In some cases, rent relief through Hudson Roots will also unlock access to additional funding, because relief-adjusted rents may meet the criteria for DSS funds. In this way, Hudson Roots can leverage the anti-displacement granting funds to create a multiplying effect on available assistance, centering a streamlined funding process around residents’ immediate needs rather than existing benefit formulas that often fail to prevent displacement. 

“The Hudson Roots Housing Assistance Program is a creative and flexible response to preventing the housing displacement of Hudson City Residents” said Tina Sharpe, Executive Director of Columbia Opportunities Inc, who supported the grant application and provided feedback during the planning phase. “Many Hudson residents struggle with the lack and loss of affordable housing. The situation has been made much worse by the COVID 19 Pandemic.  Rent relief is one of the strategies required to meet the housing needs of our friends and neighbors. We look forward to learning about the other strategies that will be offered by this network.”

Hudson Roots is funded by portions of a one million dollar grant for implementing strategies to address displacement of communities of color, released to the City of Hudson and the HCDPA in February 2021. The grant was awarded by Enterprise Community Partners, Inc. (Enterprise), in partnership with the New York State Attorney General. Hudson was one of ten cities participating in the New York State Anti-Displacement Learning Network. Since the Network’s launch in January 2020, state officials, leaders, and nonprofit partners have worked collaboratively with local stakeholders to identify particular triggers of displacement in communities of color and design targeted approaches to address them. The awarded applicants demonstrated an understanding of local causes of displacement, a history of collaborating, and a commitment to preserving and stabilizing neighborhoods facing high rates of displacement. Hudson will now implement these high-impact strategies locally with plans aiming to preserve community stabilization and allow residents to remain in their homes.  

The Hudson grant application was led by Council Members Rebecca Wolff and Calvin Lewis, Mayor Kamal Johnson, County Supervisor and Mayoral Aide Michael Chameides, Greater Hudson Promise Neighborhood service provider Serria McGriff, Columbia County Sanctuary Movement Organizer Luisa Thillet, and Galvan Foundation Vice President of Initiatives Dan Kent.

“People are struggling during the pandemic and we’re doing everything we can to get support to people who need it most” says Johnson. “This grant program is an innovative solution to long-standing housing pressures.”

Since January 2020, the Anti-Displacement Learning Network (ADLN) team has been engaging in learning sessions with Enterprise and the nine anti-displacement learning network cohorts from around New York State. The team also conducted interviews with people at risk of displacement and with staff at organizations that provide housing services. The team also researched past studies and outreach.

“The foundation of our community is our residents,” says Chameides. “This program will keep Hudson residents in Hudson.” 

In addition to Hudson Roots, the grant will also fund the creation of Hudson’s Affordable Housing Development Plan. The plan, led by Pattern for Progress, will review developable properties, funding opportunities, and development feasibility in order to create a document that recommends the operations, timeline, and partnerships for developing affordable housing.

The grant will also fund a new staff position to manage the grant, expand outreach to people of color at risk of displacement, increase coordination between organizations that provide housing services, and carry out the goals of Hudson’s Strategic Housing Action Plan (SHAP). The SHAP identified creating a housing-focused staff position as a top priority action.  

The bulk of the grant is reserved to seed a Housing Trust Fund for future anti-displacement projects. The Housing Trust Fund will be created this year and will include spending criteria, governance structure, and strategic planning.

“Congratulations to Mayor Johnson and the City of Hudson on receiving the Anti-Displacement Learning Network Grant!” says Assemblymember Didi Barrett. “The importance of a safe and stable home has been highlighted throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, and this important grant will help the city formulate a plan to address the challenge of displacement in our ever-changing community. I wish the city the best of luck in implementing their Housing Assistance Program.”

The program builds ongoing efforts to support low-income residents during the pandemic, including Universal Basic Income pilot program, job fair, and covid resources.

About St. Catherine’s
St. Catherine’s Center for Children was founded as an orphanage in Albany in 1886. Today, St. Catherine’s is a regional human services provider offering a comprehensive range of human services for children, families, and adults coping with issues of homelessness, abuse, neglect, mental illness, and access to health care. In addition to offering extensive services to the homeless and those who are at-risk of becoming homeless, St. Catherine’s offers residential
services for children ages 5 to 13, therapeutic foster care services, a special-education elementary school, and community-based services and programs designed to strengthen vulnerable families and adults. For more information, visit www.st-cath.org.

Additional Media Toolkit

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Mar 03,2021

Hiring: Youth Director and Assistant Director

The Youth Department is currently hiring for Youth Director and Assistant Youth Director.
Learn More


Mar 03,2021

New Senior Center Website

The Hudson Senior Center launched a new website: hudsonnyseniorcenter.com. Visit the website to participate in programs, access resources for seniors, and learn about opportunities for advocacy on behalf of Seniors and their caregivers. 


Feb 23,2021

Hiring: Housing Justice Director

The City of Hudson is seeking a qualified applicant to fill a position of Housing Justice Director. The position is a new position funded by an Anti-Displacement Learning Network Grant. This is a leadership position responsible for the management of housing initiatives to prevent displacement and support equitable, inclusive development. The position requires attention to and understanding of racial justice and equity. The Housing Justice Director will report to the Mayor.

For job description and qualifications, see the civil service job description.

WORK ACTIVITIES

  • Manage the implementation of the Anti-displacement Learning Network Grant
  • Establish the creation and subsequent management of a City Housing Trust Fund
  • Collaborate with a local program administrator to create and support anti-displacement initiatives such as homeownership program, rental rehab program, and emergency repairs program
  • Work with consultant to create the City of Hudson Affordable Housing Development Plan
  • Manage the implementation of the Affordable Housing Development Plan
  • Manage the implementation of the City of Hudson Strategic Housing Action Plan
  • Research and recommend policy and programs to prevent displacement
  • Monitor housing conditions and act as a liaison between the City of Hudson, Columbia County, and community-based agencies
  • Cultivate partnerships and develop collaborative projects with housing and community organizations Collaborate with local housing and social service organizations and agencies to improve services and prevent displacement
  • Collaborate with City and County Fair Housing Officers and other relevant agencies to help residents understand their housing rights
  • Engage with residents and community organizations to ensure that people at risk of displacement are involved in decision making regarding the creation and implementation of housing policy
  • Manage city budget lines relevant to community development and housing
  • Identify, write, and manage grants to support Community Development and Housing justice - initiatives, which may include, but not limited to grants through LISC, Enterprise, NYS Homes and Community Renewal, USDA, and US Department of Housing and Urban Development as well as city initiatives
  • Related work as required

QUALIFICATIONS

  • Thorough knowledge of the economics of housing, housing rights, and housing policy, especially as it pertains to equity, racial justice, and anti-displacement
  • Ability to create and manage budgets
  • Ability to research and manage policy initiatives
  • Ability to track deliverables and outcomes
  • Skilled in facilitating community participation
  • Skilled in collaborating with officials of federal, state, and municipal governments
  • Ability to communicate effectively, both orally and in writing
  • Ability to understand and interpret complex oral and written information
  • Ability to use various software packages, including spreadsheets, word processing, etc.
  • Resourcefulness, integrity, good judgment
  • Physical condition commensurate with the demands of the position

EDUCATION OR EQUIVALENT

Graduation from high school or possession of a high school equivalency diploma; AND EITHER:

(A) Graduation from a regionally accredited or New York State registered college or university with a Master's degree in public policy; public administration, planning or a related field; AND one year of experience working with people experiencing housing instability or at risk of displacement, as well as working with advocacy, community organizing, or facilitating community participation; OR               

(B) Graduation from a regionally accredited or New York State recognized college or university with a Bachelor's degree in public policy, public administration, planning or a related field and 2 years of work experience in the administration of a housing or public policy field, one year must include experience working with people experiencing housing instability or at risk of displacement, as well as working with advocacy, community organizing, or facilitating community participation; OR               

OR: (C) An equivalent combination of training and experience as described in (A) and (B)

PREFERRED QUALIFICATIONS

The following are not required:
  • Experience working in or with government 
  • Good knowledge of the needs of local municipalities
  • Leadership role in successful anti-displacement programs or policy
  • Good knowledge of contract administration
  • Good knowledge of research methods and techniques
  • Good knowledge of the principles and practices of public administration
  • Good knowledge of applying and reporting on grants

COMPENSATION

Salary: $55,000/year
Benefits: Health, Dental, and Vision; Paid Time Off; Enrollment in New York State Retirement System

This is a civil service position. The position may be filled on a provisional basis. Provisional appointment means the incumbent must take the Civil Service examination when it is offered and be among the top scorers willing to accept the appointment. Columbia County residency is preferred.

To apply, send résumé and cover letter to Michael Chameides at mayoralaide@cityofhudson.org

Note, there are also open positions for Housing Justice Outreach Team and Anti-Displacement Administrator.


Feb 19,2021

Truck Route Survey Results

As part of the City of Hudson Truck Route Traffic Feasibility Study, an online community survey was created. This information is helping to shape the future of the truck routes in the area. 329 people shared their views and experiences through the survey.
 
Learn more about the Truck Study

Feb 17,2021

Seeking Bids for Promenade Hill Park Renovation

The City of Hudson is seeking bids on the renovation of Promenade Hill Park.
Sealed bid documents must be received by March 15, 2021 at noon.

Project Narrative

The creation of universal access to Promenade Hill Park is a New York State-funded Downtown Revitalization Initiative project for the City of Hudson. The project area is located at the intersection of Front and Warren Streets, at the westernmost edge of the central commercial district. The park is open to the public and prospective bidders are encouraged to visit the park prior to submittal of their bids.

The existing park is divided between an upper historic promenade and a lower, contemporary urban plaza. The scope of this project is primarily within the footprint of the lower plaza, except for a portion of a landing at the top of the incline, which will extend east from the level of the existing promenade and improvements to an existing footpath on the upper promenade.

Proposed Scope of Work

The creation of universal access to the upper promenade will entail the removal of walls and pavements from a 1977 urban renewal project (most of the removal by the City of Hudson) and the creation of both a new accessible route and new set of stairs leading to an existing opening in a historic stone wall that provides access to the upper promenade. Selective demolition will be performed by the City of Hudson

Department of Public Works immediately prior to the mobilization of the chosen site contractor.

The scope of work includes: Construction fencing, erosion control, tree pruning and tree protection, reinforced cast in place concrete foundations, walls and ADA compliant ramps, decorative handrails, stone masonry, stone pavement, lighting (wiring by National Grid), installation of a new drinking fountain and ground hydrants, earthwork, and landscape plantings. The project also includes the installation of a spray shower. Improvements to the safety surface and seating in an existing play area at the northern end of the site are included in the project as add alternate bid item.

Learn more about the Promenade Hill Park Landscape Design

The Pre-Bid Meeting occurred on March 2, 2021 at 1pm

The Bids were opened during a live meeting on Mar 15, 2021 at 1pm

View the bid tabulation.


Feb 11,2021

Hiring: Housing Justice Outreach Team

The Hudson Community Development and Planning Agency (HCDPA) is seeking qualified applicants for part-time positions on the Housing Justice Outreach team. HCDPA and The City of Hudson have received a grant to prevent residents from being displaced from the City. The outreach team will help residents at risk of displacement to participate in new programs, provide feedback, and help shape solutions.


One goal of the outreach team will be to make sure residents are aware of a new rent-relief program and to support residents during the application process. Additional outreach activities will include creating a network of residents who can provide feedback and input on programs, mobilize people to attend public meetings,and distribute information.

This is a temporary, part-time position with flexible hours during the grant period, ending March 2022. The compensation is $20 per hour.

To apply, email mayoralaide@cityofhudson.org with the following information:

  • Describe who you will do outreach to
  • Describe how you will do outreach
  • Describe your previous experience that will help you to serve as a trusted messenger. This experience could include social and family relationships, volunteer work, relevant employment, or other life experience
  • Describe how many hours you would like to do over the next month

Note, HCDPA is also seeking applicants for an Anti-Displacement Administrator.


Feb 08,2021

Energy Saving Partnership with Hudson Housing Authority

The City of Hudson is partnering with the Hudson Housing Authority (HHA) on a grant from the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) to purchase energy-efficient refrigerators in public housing in the City of Hudson. 

Climate change poses a real and increasing threat to our local and global environments. This threat is primarily due to the burning of fossil fuels. The effects of climate change endanger our infrastructure, economy, and livelihoods. 

Replacing aging refrigerators in HHA units with energy-star models will reduce greenhouse emissions by 42.8 metric tons of CO2. Furthermore, it will save HHA $5,000 annually in electricity expenses which can be repurposed for future tenant services and capital projects. Also, it will improve the quality of life of low-income residents, providing the benefits of energy-efficient technology.

The grant application is supported by the Capital District Regional Planning Commission and Assemblymember Didi Barrett. The Mayor’s Office is currently seeking authorization from the Common Council.

This initiative is part of ongoing sustainability efforts, and the city recently announced an energy-saving lighting project.

2/8/21


Feb 02,2021

Hiring: Anti-Displacement Administrator

The Hudson Community Development and Planning Agency (HCDPA) is seeking a qualified applicant to fill a temporary position of Anti-Displacement Administrator. This position is responsible for supporting the Hudson Anti-Displacement Learning Network team and to implement a newly acquired $1,000,000 anti-displacement grant. The position requires attention to and understanding of racial justice and equity. The Administrator will work with the Mayor’s office to support launching new initiatives including:

  • Working with a consultant to create an affordable housing development plan
  • Working with a consultant and directly impacted community to create a housing trust fund
  • Working with a service agency to create a housing assistance program and related case management services
  • Creating a paid outreach team and outreach plan to ensure successful initiatives driven by people directly impacted by displacement
  • Hiring a Housing Justice Director
  • Tracking grant progress, schedule, and budget

POSITION DETAILS

Title: Hudson Anti-Displacement Administrator
Compensation: $27/hour
Type: Temporary Contract Worker
Hours: Approximately 20 hours/week
Start and End Date: This is a temporary position that will start as soon as possible and end when the Housing Justice Director is hired.
The position will run approximately February 15 - April 1

RESPONSIBILITIES

55% Support the implementation of the Anti-displacement Learning Network Grant
  • Help hire a consultant to establish a City Housing Trust Fund
  • Collaborate with local program administrators to create and support anti-displacement initiatives such as homeownership program, rental rehab program, and emergency repairs program
  • Support city of Hudson and Patterns of Progress to create the City of Hudson Affordable Housing Development Plan 
  • Hire and coordinate anti-displacement outreach team
30% Support the Anti-Displacement Learning Network Grant administration
  • Track grant expenses
  • Document outcomes
  • Project manage grant timelines, funding requests, and grant partners
5% Support the implementation of the City of Hudson Strategic Housing Action Plan
  • Research and recommend policy and programs to prevent displacement
5% Monitor housing conditions and act as a support for the City of Hudson, community-based agencies, and people at risk of displacement
  • Help residents understand their rights and available resources to prevent displacement
  • Engage with residents and community organizations to ensure that people at risk of displacement are involved in decision making regarding the creation and implementation of housing policy
5% Does related work as required


REQUIRED QUALIFICATIONS

  • Ability and experience with project management
  • Ability to create and manage spreadsheets to track budgets and quantitative data
  • Ability to communicate effectively, both orally and in writing
  • Ability to understand and interpret complex oral and written information
  • Ability to work well with officials of federal, state, and municipal governments as well as the public and others
  • Resourcefulness, integrity, good judgment
  • Physical condition commensurate with the demands of the position

Graduation from high school or possession of a high school equivalency diploma AND:

EITHER: (A) 4-year degree from an accredited college or university
OR: (B) 3 years of work experience in administration of a housing initiative, public policy, project management, communications, finance, grant administration, volunteer coordination
OR: (C) An equivalent combination of training and experience as described in (A) and (B)

Additional Qualifications

Any of the following qualifications are good to have, but not required for the position.

  • Skilled in facilitating community participation
  • Ability to track deliverables and outcomes
  • Knowledge of the economics of housing, housing rights, and housing policy
  • Experience working with housing-cost burdened, low-income, or unhoused people
  • Experience working in or with government 
  • Knowledge of the needs of local municipalities
  • Leadership role in successful anti-displacement programs or policy
  • Knowledge of contract administration
  • Knowledge of research methods and techniques
  • Knowledge of the principles and practices of public administration
  • Knowledge of various software packages
  • Knowledge of reporting on grants

HIRING PROCESS

To apply send a résumé and cover letter to Michael Chameides at mayoralaide@cityofhudson.org.


Feb 01,2021

Police Reform Public Hearing

Give your feedback on the Mayor's Police Accountability & Reconciliation Committee advisory report. 

Monday, February 1, 2021 at 5 PM

Learn more about police reform.


Feb 01,2021

Snow and Parking

The city of Hudson has cleared and removed snow after the February 1, 2021 snowstorm.

NO PARKING SIGNS

Orange no parking signs are placed to facilitate snow removal. Look out for the signs and do not park on the same side of the street as the no parking sign. No parking signs were posted February 3 - 6.

ALTERNATE SIDE PARKING

12:00 Midnight - 8:00 AM
If there are signs saying "no parking," follow the signs. Otherwise:
Park on the odd side for odd-numbered calendar dates.
Park on the even side for even-numbered calendar dates.

8:00 AM - Midnight
If there are signs saying "no parking," follow the signs. Otherwise, park on both sides of the street.

RESPONDING TO SNOW

DPW staff worked overtime shifts throughout the week responding to the snow. Initial priorities are keeping roads open, clearing sidewalks on city-owned buildings, and clearing crosswalks. Building owners and occupants have 24 hours after a snowfall to clear the sidewalk in front of the building, according to the Hudson city code. For buildings on Warren Street, they have 12 hours.

Hudson Snow Emergency Protocol


Jan 28,2021

City Partners with Promise Neighborhood and Berkshire Taconic on Police Reform

The Berkshire Taconic Community Foundation (BTCF) awards a $2,200 grant to the Greater Hudson Promise Neighborhood to expand on the work of Mayor Johnson’s Police Advisory and Reconciliation Commission (PARC). The grant will help fund programs that engage Hudson residents to examine topics such as trust between police and citizens, incidents of misconduct or brutality, and the police response to mental health and substance use issues.

The grant is part of the Bridging Divides, Healing Communities initiative to support community-building activities aimed at strengthening relationships and trust at the local level, especially among people who hold different points of view or come from different backgrounds. Funding the work of PARC is one of twenty-one grants in four counties that received funding.

PARC advises the Mayor on equality, social justice, violence reduction, and accountability related to all interactions with the community, its members, and the police. After a public survey and months of meetings, PARC presented its police reform recommendations. A public hearing is scheduled for February 1, 2021. PARC will continue to engage the community in order to help implement the reforms and identity new policy and program recommendations.

Learn more about Police Reform


Jan 22,2021

Police Reform Report

The Mayor's Police Accountability & Reconciliation Committee has issued it's advisory report. 

The report includes results from 1056 survey respondents, review of Hudson Police Department policy, analysis of the impacts of policing and incarceration, Hudson Police Department perspective, and a summary of recommendations. 


View the report presentation
Friday, January 22, 2021, 6 PM
https://youtu.be/Q2DqdakOU3k




Jan 19,2021

Reporting to the New York State and Local Employees' Retirement System


Resolution No. 7  of January 19, 2021

The New York State Retirement System requires that all elected and appointed officials, who are members of the retirement system and are not in a time & attendance system; maintain records of activities for three consecutive months within 150 days of the start of a new term or appointment.

The Retirement System also requires the municipality to post the approved resolution to the city's website for a minimum of 30 days.

Resolution No. 7 of January 19, 2021

Jan 14,2021

Energy Savings Project

The City of Hudson has upgraded lighting at city-owned Police and Hudson City Court building at 701 Union Street. The improvements will have an estimated annual savings of 59,857 kWh of power leading to an annual reduction of 65,843 pounds of CO2. It will also save the city $6,650 annually in energy costs.

221 lights were replaced with energy-efficient LED fixtures. The project costs an estimated $19,163. National Grid is contributing $18,205 of the costs. Given the cost savings, the city will recoup its share of the installation in less than a year.

Mayor Johnson’s Climate Smart Task Force initiated the project. In reviewing past projects and opportunities for additional savings, the task force identified that 701 Union had not had a recent energy audit. They also identified that National Grid offered an incentive program to audit lighting and subsidize energy-reduction projects.

“Climate change will have devastating impacts and the City of Hudson must reduce greenhouse gas emissions,” says Mayor Kamal Johnson. “I’m happy to reduce our emissions while saving the city money.”

During the construction of 701 Union, energy efficiencies were taken out of the project to save on short-term costs. 

Department of Public Works Superintendent Rob Perry managed the lighting upgrade project. He worked with Lime Energy Services Company to perform the audit and coordinate the installation. Cornell Cooperative Extension of Columbia and Greene County as well as the Capital District Regional Planning Commission provided additional support. 

“This was a great collaboration between a city-task force, multiple city departments, the Common Council, multiple nonprofits, New York State, a utility company, and a contractor,” said Michael Chameides, Chair of the Climate Smart Task Force and Aide to the Mayor. “Climate change has serious stakes and we need all hands on deck.”

Learn more about Hudson's Sustainability Efforts



1/14/2021 


Jan 13,2021

Police Reform Town Hall

Join Mayor Kamal Johnson and the Police Advisory & Reconciliation Commission for a presentation on police reforms for the City of Hudson. 

Friday, January 22, 2021, 6 PM

https://youtu.be/Q2DqdakOU3k




Learn more about Police Reform

parc town hall 1-2021


Jan 11,2021

City Awarded $1 Million Grant To Prevent Displacement of Residents

Hudson Implementing Strategies to Prevent Community Displacement in Partnership with New York State Attorney General and Enterprise Community Partners

Enterprise committing $1 million to address specific causes and triggers of community displacement in Hudson, NY

The City of Hudson and the Hudson Community Development and Planning Agency (HCDPA) have been awarded a one million dollar grant for implementing strategies to address displacement of communities of color. The grant was awarded by Enterprise Community Partners, Inc. (Enterprise), in partnership with the New York State Attorney General. Hudson was one of ten cities participating in the New York State Anti-Displacement Learning Network. Since the Network’s launch in January 2020, state officials, leaders, and nonprofit partners have worked collaboratively with local stakeholders to identify particular triggers of displacement in communities of color and design targeted approaches to address them. The awarded applicants demonstrated an understanding of local causes of displacement, a history of collaborating, and a commitment to preserving and stabilizing neighborhoods facing high rates of displacement. Hudson will now implement these high-impact strategies locally, supported by $1 million committed by Enterprise, with plans aiming to preserve community stabilization and allow residents to remain in their homes.  

“As the COVID-19 pandemic and its economic fallout continue to devastate New York communities, it’s especially crucial that we work together to keep residents safely housed and prevent community displacement,” said Judi Kende, vice president and New York market leader, Enterprise Community Partners. “We are proud to have collaborated with local leaders and the Office of the Attorney General to create strategies that will stabilize communities and protect residents and their homes. We look forward now to implementing these life-changing plans in each community.” 

“The COVID-19 pandemic has left us on the verge of an acute housing crisis in New York,” said Attorney General Letitia James. “From Buffalo to Brooklyn, the New York State Anti-Displacement Learning Network is essential in identifying and addressing issues that promote housing displacement among communities, such as predatory landlords, housing discrimination, and the lack of low-income housing. I am committed to continuing the great work with Enterprise Community Partners to help curb community displacement throughout the state.”

“This grant is an important step in addressing our housing crisis,” says Mayor Kamal Johnson. 

The Hudson grant application was led by Council Members Rebecca Wolff and Calvin Lewis, Mayor Kamal Johnson, County Supervisor and Mayoral Aide Michael Chameides, Greater Hudson Promise Neighborhood service provider Serria McGriff, Columbia County Sanctuary Movement Organizer Luisa Thillet, and Galvan Foundation Vice President of Initiatives Dan Kent.

Since January 2020, the Anti-Displacement Learning Network (ADLN) team has been engaging in learning sessions with Enterprise and the nine anti-displacement learning network cohorts from around New York State. The team also conducted interviews with people at risk of displacement and with staff at organizations that provide housing services. The team also researched past studies and outreach. 

The grant will fund a new partnership with St. Catherine’s Center for Children, with collaboration from the Columbia County Department of Social Services, to provide emergency funds and opt-in case management to Hudson residents at immediate risk of displacement. Many at risk of displacement can’t access emergency funds because of the existing eligibility requirements. Often, living in market-rate housing or paying above 30% of one’s income for housing creates ineligibility for housing assistance programs. This new program will supply emergency funds for renters who wouldn’t otherwise qualify. At the same time, it will provide gap funding where in some cases it will make someone eligible, thereby unlocking and leveraging additional state and federal funds.

The grant will also fund a collaboration with Pattern for Progress on the creation of Hudson’s Affordable Housing Development Plan. The plan will review developable properties, funding opportunities, and development feasibility in order to create a document that recommends the operations, timeline, and partnerships for developing affordable housing.

The grant will also fund a new staff position to expand outreach to people of color at risk of displacement, increase coordination between organizations that provide housing services, carry out the goals of Hudson’s Strategic Housing Action Plan (SHAP), and advance the grant projects. The SHAP identified creating a housing-focused staff position as a top priority action. 

The bulk of the grant is reserved to seed a Housing Trust Fund for future anti-displacement projects. The Housing Trust Fund will be created this year and will include spending criteria, governance structure, and strategic planning.

“Too many of my friends and neighbors displaced from Hudson,” says Chameides. “This grant will fund programs that will make a  difference in people’s lives and, in turn, improve our community.”

Rebecca Wolff notes that “the strategies funded in this grant demonstrate that in fact there are tools and initiatives that can push back against the forces that push longtime residents out of neighborhoods. This grant names the problem that Hudson has been experiencing for decades--displacement--and helps us develop tools to address it.”

"This grant provides urgent financial support to households facing eviction due to COVID-19, grant funding to homebuyers, and helps increase the supply of affordable rental housing," said Dan Kent of Galvan Foundation. "These initiatives bring Hudson one step closer to concretely addressing Hudson's housing affordability crisis."

Resident displacement is a major cause of community destabilization across New York. Displacement disproportionately harms low-income communities and people of color, furthering racial inequity and causing increased and entrenched poverty, economic immobility, and weakened cultural ties and support networks. 

Displacement triggers across the Anti-Displacement Learning Network’s ten participating municipalities and counties vary. These include predatory landlords and housing discrimination, stagnant wages, housing quality, rapid and ongoing escalation of property values, high-cost housing, lack of affordable housing, high property taxes, deed theft scams, and high rates of poverty and unemployment. Tactics to prevent displacement, such as providing emergency rental assistance and new community resources, will address the specific triggers of each community. Participants will also plan community awareness and engagement campaigns tailored to meet their specific local causes. 

Enterprise worked alongside the Attorney General’s office as well as PolicyLink and the Center for Community Progress to design learning sessions and collaborate with jurisdiction teams on developing their strategies. 

"Disrupting the cycles of vacancy and neighborhood destabilization are critical as we build back from COVID-19 and collectively advance racial justice and inclusion imperatives," said Dr. Akilah Watkins, President and CEO of Community Progress. "This bold work spearheaded by New York leaders to help vulnerable residents and fight displacement is well-positioned to become a model for what's possible across our nation."

“The Covid-19 pandemic has worsened an already severe housing crisis of displacement, evictions, and housing insecurity in low-income communities and communities of color throughout New York State,” said Chris Schildt, Senior Associate at PolicyLink. “Through this initiative, local government and community partners have come together to develop strategies that disrupt the drivers of displacement and create a more equitable housing system coming out of this crisis.” 

The Anti-Displacement Learning Network’s strategies to prevent community displacement are expected to commence in January 2021. Through this program, state officials, leaders, and nonprofit partners will work collaboratively to move the dial on tackling local displacement triggers and developing models that could be replicated across the country.

About Enterprise 

Enterprise works with partners nationwide to build opportunity. We bring together the nationwide know-how, partners, policy leadership and investments to multiply the impact of local affordable housing development. Over more than 35 years, Enterprise has created nearly 585,000 homes, invested $43.6 billion and touched millions of lives. Join us at www.EnterpriseCommunity.org.


About the Center for Community Progress

Founded in 2010, the Center for Community Progress is the national leader for building strong, equitable communities where vacant, abandoned, and deteriorated properties are transformed into assets for neighbors and neighborhoods. Today, Community Progress has affected change in more than 48 states and seven countries through leadership education, technical assistance, and collaborative systems, policy, and practice reforms. Simply, we work to transform “Vacant Spaces into Vibrant Places.”  For more information, visit CommunityProgress.net.

About PolicyLink

PolicyLink is a national research and action institute advancing racial and economic equity by Lifting Up What Works®. For more information, visit PolicyLink.org.

Jan 08,2021

Hudson Connects Connectivity Plan

At the Monday, January 11, 2021 Common Council meeting, there will be a presentation of the draft Hudson Connects Connectivity Plan. The city is partnering with street design consultants Arterial, and they will share proposed improvements for streets, sidewalks, and intersections in the DRI district. The presentation will review cost projections and options for which projects to prioritize. This meeting will be an opportunity for the public to provide feedback and ask questions of the City and design team.

The Common Council meeting is on January 11 at 7:00 PM. Check the city website the day of the meeting for log-in details. 

More on Hudson Connects


Jan 05,2021

Public Transportation Survey

Take the public transportation survey and help determine needs and ways to improve services. 



The Public Transportation Survey is sponsored by The Spark of Hudson and The Greater Hudson Promise Neighborhood.


bus survey


Jan 05,2021

2020 Year In Review

Mayor Kamal Johnson has issued the following statement. 

As I put the cap on my first year as Mayor of the city of Hudson. I would like to take some time to reflect on our many partnerships that have helped my administration navigate a very difficult year.

This year has been a literal “trial by fire” and I am appreciative to all those who have worked hard right alongside me all year. Thank you to every citizen, board/committee, the Common Council/President, every organization, citizen’s groups, and everyone working hard for our great city. You are all appreciated I hope that 2021 is filled with miracles, good news, freedom, and love for all. There’s a lot I left out but more importantly a lot more to come in 2021! 


Dec 21,2020

City of Hudson Awarded NYSDEC Urban Forestry Grant

Hudson Mayor Kamal Johnson is pleased to announce that the City of Hudson has been awarded an Urban Forestry Grant from The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation. The $20,000 Community and Urban Forestry Round 15 Grant will fund the creation of a tree inventory and tree management plan executed by professional foresters.

“The grant is an important opportunity to plan ahead and create a city that values our natural resources and a healthy environment,” says Mayor Kamal Johnson.

The comprehensive project will include documenting all of Hudson’s street trees and most park trees. The trees will be cataloged by GIS location, species, size, health, planting site, and care recommendations. The Forester will create a database and produce a written five-year Urban Forest Management Plan.

“Healthy community forests provide a host of environmental, economic, and social benefits, including wildlife habitat, watershed protection, flood reduction, increased property values, and improved public health,” said Commissioner Seggos announcing the awards. “Governor Andrew Cuomo is investing in the health of New York’s communities through the State's Environmental Protection Fund, providing crucial assistance for our state’s vital forests to thrive.” 

The City of Hudson is one of 38 projects to receive funding, from a total of 154 applications. 

“We of the Conservation Advisory Council (CAC) for the City of Hudson are very excited about this Tree Inventory and Urban Forestry Management Plan,” said Hilary Hillman, member of the Hudson CAC, who coordinated the grant application. “Our tree canopy belongs to every resident in the city. It provides each of us cleaner air, cools down our streets and buildings in the summer, drinks up stormwater, keeps our topsoil from eroding, and invites nature into our lives. Once we have an inventory and a management plan we will be able to chart the care for the trees we have and better plan for future planting of native species trees to expand our urban forest while enhancing the livability of the city for all.”  

The Hudson CAC had planned for 2020 to be “The Year of the Tree.” Informational panel discussions, tree plantings, and interactive programs were canceled due to the pandemic. “We have had an understandable delay in our 2020 plans due to Covid-19, but if this year has taught us anything it is the importance of getting out into nature, breathing in the clean air and taking in the calm that nature offers,” said Hillman. “We will resume our informational programs for residents in an appropriate matter. Hudson’s Urban Forest belongs to us all and we want to make it strong for generations to come.”

Learn more about Hudson’s environmental sustainability projects.

Dec 17,2020

Snow and Parking

As of December 22, 2020, at 9:30 AM, it is anticipated the snow removal will conclude today. Normal alternate parking rules are in effect, unless otherwise posted. Normal rules for parking lots are in effect. Metered parking is still suspended

We appreciate your patience and cooperation as DPW staff remove large amounts of snow from miles of city streets.

NO PARKING SIGNS

Orange no parking signs are placed to facilitate snow removal. Look out for the signs and do not park on the same side of the street as the no parking sign.

RESPONDING TO SNOW

DPW staff worked overtime shifts Wednesday through Tuesday. Initial priorities were keeping roads open, clearing sidewalks on city-owned buildings, and clearing crosswalks. Snow removal began on Friday. No parking signs were placed on Friday afternoon and moved as neccessary to facilitate snow removal. The city issued daily updates to keep the public updated on the progress. 


Throughout the snow response, normal alternate side parking rules were in effect, unless otherwise posted. Residents were encouraged to park in city lots.

Building owners and occupants have 24 hours after a snowfall to clear the sidewalk in front of the building, according to the Hudson city code. For buildings on Warren Street, they have 12 hours. Code Enforcement has been contacting non-compliant building owners. 

Hudson Snow Emergency Protocol


Dec 15,2020

Recycling on Wednesday Morning

Hudson residents are encouraged to put out household recycling on Tuesday night/Wednesday morning for city-wide recycling pickup on the morning of 12/16/20.  Snow is predicted for Thursday, the normal recycling day, which can bury recycling containers and prevent normal pickup. Snow buried recycling can lead to litter and damage to snow removal machines. 

More information on Recycling

Dec 14,2020

Hudson Connects Connectivity Plan

At the Tuesday, December 15 Common Council meeting, there will be a presentation of the draft Hudson Connects Connectivity Plan. The city is partnering with street design consultants Arterial, and they will share proposed improvements for streets, sidewalks, and intersections in the DRI district. This meeting will be an opportunity for the public to provide feedback and ask questions of the City and design team.

The Common Council meeting is on December 15 at 7:00 PM. Check the city website the day of the meeting for log-in details. 

More on Hudson Connects


Dec 14,2020

Parking Meters Suspended

Mayor Johnson has suspended requirements to put coins in City of Hudson parking meters from December 14 - 31, 2020. Metered parking goes back into effect on January 1, 2021. During this period, parking at the Amtrak Parking Lot still requires the normal fee. Have a Happy Holiday Season.

More on Parking

Dec 10,2020

Truck Study Survey

Give input on the existing truck traffic within Hudson and the resulting impact on people living, working, and visiting Hudson. 

The survey closed on January 8, 2021

More on Truck Study


Dec 08,2020

2021 Municipal Parking Lot Permits

2021 Annual Parking Permits will go on sale Monday, December 14th
The parking permit shall allow a vehicle in which the annual parking permit is prominently displayed to be parked in any municipal parking lot without parking meter payments provided, however, that no vehicle 84 inches or more in width and more than 84 inches in height or more than 20 feet in length may use such annual parking permit.
The purchase of the Municipal Lot Parking Permit DOES NOT exempt the permit holder from any parking rules or regulations.
Complete the Municipal Parking Lot Permit Application and mail to the City Clerk's Office 
or contact the office during regular office hours to schedule an appointment.
Municipal Parking Permit Fee is $250

Municipal Parking Lot Permit Application

Nov 30,2020

Truck Route Study Meeting

The City of Hudson is pleased to announce a public information meeting for the Truck Route Destination and Origin Study. The online meeting will take place Thursday, December 10, 2020, at 6:00 PM. 

View the presentation at the bottom of the Truck Study Page

The meeting will review the study project and timeline. M.J. Engineering and Land Surveying, P.C  will present the origin and destination data collected on truck traffic in Hudson. They will also review the anticipated next steps for this study. Afterward, there will be an opportunity to ask questions about the data collected and to share personal experiences about truck traffic in Hudson. The report on existing conditions will be refined based on this feedback. 

For those that can’t attend the meeting, the presentation will be posted to the city website.

NEXT STEPS

Once the current conditions report is finalized, the project team will study and propose alternate routes that reduce harms and provide consideration to how nearby stakeholders may be impacted by alternate truck routes. Once the alternate routes have been studied, there will be an additional opportunity for public feedback. In addition to the public information meetings, the City and the consultant team will be organizing stakeholder group meetings and conducting an online community survey. 

Using the data collected and proposed alternatives, the City of Hudson will then work with surrounding Towns, Columbia County, New York State, and stakeholders to build consensus for modification and improvement to the existing truck route.  

The City of Hudson is conducting this Truck Route Traffic Feasibility Study to assess the impacts associated with the New York State designated truck route that traverses the City of Hudson and deleteriously influences the community’s quality of life and economic vitality in a number of ways.  The study will measure and report truck traffic through the city, inclusive of the origin, destination, and volume of truck traffic. The origin and destination data will be combined with an assessment of the environmental (public health), physical (infrastructure degradation), and social (neighborhoods and residents) effects of truck traffic. 

More information about the project can be found at http://www.cityofhudson.org/business/truck-route.php.

Nov 29,2020

Alternate Side Parking

Preparing for winter weather, starting Saturday, December 5, 2020 alternate side parking will be in effect 7 days a week.
 
12:00 Midnight - 8:00 AM
Park on the odd side for odd-numbered calendar dates.
Park on the even side for even-numbered calendar dates. 
 
Example
Friday, December 4, 12:00 Midnight to 8:00 AM: Park on even side
Saturday, December 5, 12:00 Midnight to 8:00 AM: Park on odd side
Sunday, December 6, 12:00 Midnight to 8:00 AM: Park on even side

Note the time that alternate side regulation begins at 12:00 Midnight. If parking on the evening of December 4 to leave the car parked until the morning of December 5, park on the odd side of the street so that you comply December 5, 12-8 AM.

8:00 AM - Midnight, unless otherwise posted or a snow emergency is declared, parking on both sides. 
 

Nov 25,2020

Mayor Johnson Issues Local State of Emergency Proclamation


Pursuant to New York State Executive Law, Article 2-B, Section 24, Mayor Kamal Johnson declares and proclaims a Local State of Emergency in the City of Hudson, New York beginning November 23, 2020 at 12:00 PM.

Local State of Emergency Proclamation (11/23/2020)
Local State of Emergency Order No. 27 (11/23/2020)

Nov 23,2020

K.I.S.S. - Keeping Identities of Seniors Safe

DATE:  11/30/2020 - 12/11/2020
TIME: Monday - Friday,  8:30am - 5:00pm
Location:  Hudson City Hall
                 520 Warren Street
                 Hudson, NY 12534
(APPOINTMENT ONLY.  Please call 518-828-1030 to schedule an appointment.)

The Columbia County KISS Program is once again available to seniors in every town in Columbia County.  The KISS Program, founded by Columbia County Clerk Holly Tanner, stands for Keeping the Identities of Seniors Safe.  It was designed to protect the identities of our seniors while assisting them in the shredding of their sensitive materials.  Seniors are encouraged to contact their local town hall for hours of operation and more information on the program.  Justin Weaver, Columbia County Clerk's Records Services Manager, is overseeing the program and can also be contacted with any questions at 518-822-0143.

For Additional information click here.

To view the Item Retention Guideline and Disposal list click here.

Nov 19,2020

Do Your Part: Stay at Home

City of Hudson issues Stay at Home Advisory amid rising COVID-19 cases 

As COVID-19 cases continue to rise, the City of Hudson advises residents and visitors to stay at home to reduce the spread. In recent weeks, Hudson has experienced an increase in weekly COVID-19 cases. Between October 30 and November 13, Hudson had 15 residents confirmed to have coronavirus, 20% of the total cases of Hudson residents to date. Over the past weeks, Columbia County has had a significant increase in cases and hospitalizations. As of November 18, Columbia County has 92 people with active cases—more people than we had during the spring peak.  

Therefore, the City of Hudson strongly advises residents to stay inside their homes and avoid interaction with people outside their household. Unless traveling for work, school, or essential needs, avoid unnecessary trips. When going outside, wear a mask, practice six feet of physical distancing whenever possible, and avoid crowded areas.

The City of Hudson will continue to enforce social distancing regulations and requires businesses to follow statewide COVID-19 guidelines.

This advisory follows the recent order from Governor Andrew Cuomo ordering Bars, Restaurants and Gyms to close at 10pm and the public to significantly reduce the size of gathering. To report on COVID-19 issues contact Hudson Code Enforcement, Hudson Police, or New York State Pause Enforcement.

We also encourage residents to get tested. Learn about testing options and covid resources

Do your part: reduce the spread. Together, we keep each other safe.


Nov 17,2020

Sidewalk Audit via Drone

On Thursday, November 19, a drone team will be in Hudson to help map sidewalk accessibility. The project is part of a city sidewalk audit and will report on sidewalk and curb ramp barriers and will list the location of the barrier, the barrier, and how the barrier is not in compliance with ADA standards. The drone images, captured by an FAA drone-certified pilot, will be paired with on-the-ground measurements and photographs.

The drone and sidewalk audit will cover sidewalks between Henry Hudson Riverfront Park, Promenade Hill Park, City Hall, the Youth Center, the Senior Center, Oakdale Park, the Central Fire Station, and the Police Station.

Learn more about City of Hudson ADA.


Nov 12,2020

Take the Shared Streets Survey

This summer, the City of Hudson implemented the Shared Streets program to help businesses reopen safely. The program ended on November 1, and the City would like your help evaluating the program. Please fill out one of the surveys below. Because no one knows what the future holds, the data collected will help the City make an informed decision in the Spring on how to best support businesses and residents.




The survey will close on Sunday, November 22, 2020.

The Hudson Shared Streets program is a collaboration between the City of Hudson, Design for Six Feet, FUTURE HUDSON, and Hudson Hall, with additional financial support from Mark and Deborah D’Arcy, Columbia Economic Development Corporation, and The Spark of Hudson, and with the services of Marc Scrivo & Two Hawk Hudson and George Wachtel of Audience Research & Analysis.


Nov 12,2020

Coronavirus Safety

New York State has issued new safety guidelines to prevent the spread of coronavirus. The guidelines include: 

  • Effective November 13, 2020 at 10 p.m., bars, restaurants and gyms, as well as any State Liquor Authority-licensed establishment, must close in-person service from 10 p.m. to 5 a.m. daily.
  • Effective November 13, 2020 at 10 p.m., indoor and outdoor gatherings at private residences will be limited to no more than 10 people. 
  • New travel guidelines are in effect that allow out-of-state travelers to “test out” of the mandatory 14-day quarantine. 
  • Go to New York's COVID Report Card hosted by the Department of Health to find COVID-19 positive case data for every school district in the state.
  • Movie theaters outside of New York City can reopen starting October 23 at 25% capacity with no more than 50 people allowed in front of each screen. Theaters can only open outside of New York City in counties that have COVID-19 positivity rates of less than 2% on a 14-day average and do not have any cluster zones.
  • To report violations of health and safety restrictions and requirements for businesses, gatherings and individuals, please choose the appropriate link below:
    File a complaint about a business, location or incident in your community.

    File a complaint against your employer or place of work.

Additional Resources


Nov 10,2020

Meals-on-Wheels

Seeking volunteers for the Meals-on-Wheels Program. Drivers are needed for the Hudson area. This is an opportunity to “Care for those who cared for us”. If interested in helping out, please call the The Columbia County Office for the Aging Philmont Kitchen at 518-672-5323 and ask for either Amy or Lisa.

More about services for Seniors


Nov 09,2020

Coronavirus

More people are contracting coronavirus in Hudson and Columbia County. Prevent the spread of coronavirus. Do your part: cover your face, wash your hands often, physical distance, and reduce interactions with people outside your household. 

More on coronavirus resources

TESTING

Testing is available, including free tests on November 10 and 17. 

More on coronavirus testing

Nov 04,2020

Flu Vaccine

Do your part: get the flu vaccine. Get a flu shot every year. It just takes a few minutes and helps our community stay safe. 
  • Reduce your risk of flu illness, hospitalization, and death
  • Reduce transmission of the flu to others
  • Reduce the risk that you or others in our community would get both the flu and COVID-19, which could be particularly dangerous
  • Save healthcare resources for the care of patients with COVID-19

Locations in the Hudson area include CVS, Walgreens, Walmart, and Columbia County Department of Health. To find a location near you, visit https://vaccinefinder.org/


NYS Flu Tracker

Columbia County Department of Health

columbiacountynyhealth.com/
325 Columbia Street, Hudson


The Columbia County Department of Health offers the flu vaccine. All clinics are by appointment only. Make an appointment by calling 518-828-3358. 

Tuesdays 11/10, 11/17, 12/1, and 12/8, 1:00 - 3:30 PM

Tuesday 11/24, 4:00 - 6:00 PM

The Department of Health accepts the following insurance plans:

Blue Shield of North East New York, CDPHP, Fidelis, Medicare Part B, Medicaid, MVP, and United Health Care. Other senior plans may be billed, including some Blue Cross Blue Shield plans. If you are uninsured or underinsured, you may be eligible for a lower fee or no fee for the flu vaccine. 

TRANSPORTATION

The Children and Adults Rural Transportation Service (CARTS), a program of the Healthcare Consortium, provides free door-to-door non-emergency medical transportation. Call 518-822-8020 or visit columbiahealthnet.org/programs/medical-transportation/ 

Public Transportation

HEALTH INSURANCE

Get help shopping for, selecting, and enrolling in health insurance from a Healthcare Consortium Navigator. Call 518-822-8820 or visit columbiahealthnet.org/programs/navigator.

flu


Oct 30,2020

Shared Streets Ends November 1

Hudson’s Shared Streets program ends on November 1. Since its beginning in June, this program has successfully assisted our restaurants and businesses along Warren Street to make the best of the extreme challenges presented by the coronavirus.

As the program ends on Sunday, November 1, permit holders are required to remove all equipment and obstacles in the parking spaces by the end of the day on November 3.  Any further use of parking spaces will be governed by Chapter 305 of the Hudson City Code and subject to any permits issued by the Hudson Police Department. Business owners are required to maintain proper passage of 4’ for pedestrians on sidewalks in front of their establishments.

The City would like to recognize the efforts of its city employees and volunteers who helped make the program a success, in particular the efforts of the Hudson Police Department, Department of Public Works, Hudson Fire Department, and the Office of Code Enforcement.

The Shared Streets program was made possible by the strong support of the Hudson Tourism Board, the Columbia Economic Development Corporation, and The Spark of Hudson. The City is also very grateful for the generous donation from Mark and Deborah D’Arcy who offset the lost parking revenues the city would have incurred and thus avoided having to charge any permit fees during the program.

The successful implementation of the program was due to the intrepid efforts of Hudson Hall; Peter Spear & FUTURE Hudson; Kaja Kuhl & You Are The City; Elena Mosley & Operation Unite NY; Columbia-Greene Workforce Development Office; Columbia-Greene Media, Marc Scrivo; Basil Nooks, and everyone who served as Shared Streets Ambassadors.

No one knows what the future of this pandemic will be and whether there will be a need for a resumption of the program in the Spring. The City will continue to work with stakeholders to anticipate what future programs will be necessary and how they can benefit everyone in the city. It is notable that despite the legitimate concerns that Shared Streets could result in unpleasant consequences, the program worked very well and resulted in very few complaints. That is a testament to the efforts of Hudson business owners, residents, and our city employees in making this work. That community spirit will help us through the upcoming winter and give us hope for a reopening in the spring.

10/30/2020


Oct 29,2020

Weekend Alternate Side Parking

Preparing for potential snow and snow removal, alternate side parking will be in effect this weekend.

  • Friday, October 30, 2020 12:00 Midnight to 8:00 AM: Park on even side
  • Saturday, October 31, 2020 12:00 Midnight to 8:00 AM: Park on odd side
  • Sunday, November 1, 2020 12:00 Midnight to 8:00 AM: Park on odd side

Note the time that alternate side regulation begins at 12:00 Midnight. If parking on the evening of October 29 to leave the car parked until the morning of October 30, park on the even side of the street so that you comply October 30, 12-8 AM.

8:00 AM - Midnight, unless otherwise posted or a snow emergency is declared, parking on both sides. 

See the City of Hudson Snow Emergency Policy

WEEKDAY ALT SIDE PARKING CONTINUES

Monday - Friday: 12:00 Midnight - 8:00 AM

On all streets within the City unless otherwise posted: 

  • Park on the odd side for odd-numbered calendar dates. 
  • Park on the even side for even-numbered calendar dates. 

NOVEMBER 7 WEEKEND: BOTH SIDE PARKING

Pending weather reports, weekend both sides parking will resume on November 7.

More on Parking Regulations
December 5 Announcement


Oct 28,2020

Street Improvement Demonstration Project

As part of the Hudson Connects street improvement project, the Hudson Connects project team worked alongside residents and local artist Kirby Crone to install two demonstration projects. Using temporary materials such as paint, these projects test preliminary design concepts and demonstrate how intersections and streets in Hudson could be made safer for pedestrians and cyclists.

EVALUATING THE PROJECTS

By narrowing travel lanes and expanding pedestrian spaces, this project strives to bring focus to pedestrians and slow vehicular traffic where people are most vulnerable. The Hudson Connects project team has studied the sites since implementation and observed vehicles taking slower turns at these sites and yielding to pedestrians at crossings with increased frequency. In addition, hundreds of people participated in a survey. All of the data collection, survey findings and community input will be incorporated into the final design concepts over the winter in preparation for permanent construction in 2021. Design plans will be presented to the public, likely in December 2020. 

SCHEDULE FOR TEMPORARY PROJECTS 

The intersection improvement at Front and Warren was created to be very temporary - with the paint that would only last for a rain or two. The bollards (plastic poles), tape, and ramps will be removed shortly. Pedestrians should wait to cross the street at the curb. Drivers should use the paint as a guide for turning.

The intersection improvement at State and 2nd, while temporary, is designed to last several months. The bollards and ramps will be removed shortly in order to allow for snow maintenance. In the Spring of 2021, the City will review the conditions and determine if the bollards will be added back to the area. The painted pedestrian lane along State Street will remain. Drivers and pedestrians should continue to exercise caution. At the intersection of State and 2nd, pedestrians should wait to cross the street at the curb. Drivers should use the paint as a guide for turning. 

Both projects will continue to inform the 2021 construction project as well as other street projects in the City of Hudson. 

COMMUNITY INPUT

These demonstration projects were the culmination in a series of community events to gather public input on the future of Hudson’s streets. Previously, Hudson Connects organized a walking tour with local residents as well as public meetings at Hudson Hall and Promenade Hill Park to gather feedback and discuss various issues and observations. The next opportunity for public input will be in December, when the draft Connectivity Plan will be presented to the council. Please be on the lookout for more information about how to attend and provide input on the plan! 

More about Hudson Connects


Oct 26,2020

Virtual Job Fair

Attend the virtual job fair on Monday, October 26, 6:00 PM. Find the career you are looking for from over a dozen employers. Several local employers will share opportunities in a variety of fields from entry-level to management. Meet with employers and learn about job opportunities.

Join Zoom Meeting
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/88382996513?pwd=VzlsZlFFYk5TZXc3UXh2YVRBQ0hvZz09&fbclid=IwAR2h4-W_k5bA1a5apGgYNHHvoNoQjrUOWkSonl80PA44m9iVHd-1rXvP04k
Meeting ID: 883 8299 6513
Passcode: NewJob123
One tap mobile
+19292056099,,88382996513#,,,,,,0#,,578662935# US (New York)
+13126266799,,88382996513#,,,,,,0#,,578662935# US (Chicago)

View on Facebook


virtualjobfair

Presenters

  • AAF Flanders
  • Columbia-Greene Workforce NY
  • Devereux
  • Ghent Rehabilitation and Nursing Center
  • Ginsberg’s Food
  • Hudson City School District
  • Inflight Inc
  • Key Bank
  • Pretium Packaging
  • Tollgate Road Logistics

Oct 26,2020

City Audits Sidewalk Accessibility

The City of Hudson is auditing sidewalks to ensure accessibility. The City of Hudson has hired architectural firm Hyman Hayes Associates to measure and report on sidewalks between key areas of service in the City of Hudson.

“Everyone deserves access to city services,” says Mayor Kamal Johnson. “To make our services accessible, the sidewalks need to be accessible.”

The sidewalk audit will review sidewalks between Henry Hudson Riverfront Park, Promenade Hill Park, City Hall, the Youth Center, the Senior Center, Oakdale Park, the Central Fire Station, and the Police Station. The audit will report on sidewalk and curb ramp barriers and will list the location of the barrier, the barrier, and how the barrier is not in compliance with ADA standards. 

“I’m happy to be contributing to our community and advancing this important accessibility project,” says City of Hudson Public Works Commissioner Peter Bujanow, who is managing the project. “This audit will help us understand and address the barriers so that people of all abilities can access City facilities and parks with ease, feel welcomed and included to participate in programs and services, and travel freely and safely at intersections throughout the City.”

“This is an important step to making Hudson a more equitable city,” says Mayoral Aide and ADA Coordinator Michael Chameides.

The sidewalk audit project area was determined by an October 2019 settlement agreement between the United States Department of Justice and the City of Hudson. In addition to the audit, residents can also report ADA barriers.

After the audit is complete and barriers have been identified, the City of Hudson will create a plan for sidewalk ADA compliance. Property owners are responsible for maintaining accessible sidewalks and curb ramps. The City of Hudson Common Council is also exploring alternative solutions to improve sidewalks.

The sidewalk audit is one of several active projects to improve street accessibility and safety, including Promenade Hill Park redesign, Hudson Connects street improvements, Empire State Trail, new crosswalk signals, new crosswalks, Ferry Street bridge construction, Truck Route study, and improvements at the intersection of Green and Fairview.

Learn more about City of Hudson ADA

10/26/2020

Oct 15,2020

Weekend Parking

Note: updated guidelines starting December 5, 2020

--

Starting Saturday, October 17, 2020: on weekends, overnight parking on both sides of the street is allowed until further notice. 

Parking Guideline

Monday - Friday: 12:00 Midnight - 8:00 AM
On all streets within the City unless otherwise posted:
  • Park on the odd side for odd-numbered calendar dates. 
  • Park on the even side for even-numbered calendar dates. 

Note the time that alternate side regulation begins at 12:00 Midnight. If parking on the evening of October 15 to leave the car parked until the morning of October 16, park on the even side of the street so that you comply October 16, 12-8 AM.

8:00 AM - Midnight, Unless otherwise posted, parking on both sides.

Saturday - Sunday:

Unless otherwise posted, parking on both sides. Both sides weekend policy continues until further notice. 

As we approach winter, please be aware of the City of Hudson Emergency Policy

More on Parking Regulations


Oct 13,2020

Change Begins at Home

On October 14 at Noon, Mayor Kamal Johnson joins a panel on the intersectionality of race, disability, and voting. The event is organized by Disability Rights New York. Other speakers include:

  • Stephanie Anderson, MSM
    Trayvon Martin Foundation
  • Keith Gurgui
    Voting Rights Activist Ulster County, NY
  • Mike Lincoln
    Voting Rights Activist St. Lucie County, FL



Why are local elections impactful to marginalized communities? How can your vote change how your government works to combat racism and discrimination? Your vote matters in every election.

Bring your questions and thoughts about voting in the General Election to discuss with our panel of social justice champions. Closed captioning and ASL interpretation provided. If you have any questions or require specific accommodations, please contact Helen Hellmuth at helen.hellmuth@drny.org or 518-860-8158.

Flyer - English
Flyer - Español


Oct 09,2020

Police Survey

If you live or work in the City of Hudson, please complete the Hudson Community Police survey. The survey engages the Hudson community in discussing their experiences with the Hudson Police Department. The survey will help inform the Police Reconciliation & Advisory Commission's analysis and recommendations to Mayor Johnson.

The survey is open until November 1. It is available in English, Spanish, and Bengali. Responses are anonymous. The survey takes about 10 minutes, and your participation will contribute to making Hudson a better place to live, work, and thrive.


Oct 09,2020

Truck Study

The City of Hudson is working with MJ Engineering & Land Surveying, P.C. (MJ) to perform a destination and origin study for trucks traveling through Hudson. New York State truck routes traverse the City of Hudson and deleteriously impact the community’s quality of life and economic vitality. The study will collect data and propose alternative truck routes. Using the study, the City of Hudson will then work with surrounding towns, Columbia County, New York State, and a variety of stakeholders to build consensus for modification and improvement to the truck route.

“Residents need a more walkable, bikeable city, with safe streets that are accessible to all,” says Mayor Kamal Johnson. “The high-volume of large trucks through dense residential neighborhoods is the wrong route and this study will help create solutions.”

Read More


Oct 08,2020 street-improvement-650

Street Improvements

Safe streets took a step forward with the building out of two demonstration projects that calm traffic and make the streets more pedestrian friendly. The project is part of Hudson Connects, a $4m State-funded DRI project. The City of Hudson is partnering with Arterial and Street Plans and worked with more than 50 community volunteers and artist Kirby Crone to transform two important intersections and test what may be possible.

front-aerial

The installation at the Front Street and Warren Street intersection will last until the next rainfall while the one at State Street and 2nd Street will last through the winter and into next year. Arterial will be monitoring these intersections with Creighton Manning Engineering, LLP over the next several weeks and months which will help to inform the final design. The team will be studying how these temporary improvements impact both vehicular and pedestrian behavior. 


Give your feedback and help shape the next phase of the project. 

painting-family

Over the next several months, a plan will be developed for the City's waterfront BRIDGE District and connecting areas that will lay the groundwork for the construction of a portion of the plan along with future capital improvements.

state

Learn more about the project


Oct 08,2020

Power Outage

October 13, 7:00 AM: No reported outages in the City of Hudson

October 8, 5:00 PM
: National Grid estimates four outage sites within the City of Hudson. All four are estimated to be repaired by October 8, 7:00 PM.

Prison Alley between Eighth and Prospect is closed.

October 8, 10:45 AM: many residents and businesses are experiencing a loss of electricity due to last night’s high winds. National Grid reports four separate outages in Hudson: Warren Street, Worth Street, Front Street, and partial power on the 300 and 400 blocks of State Street. National Grid estimates all four will be repaired by October 8, 3:00 PM. There are additional power outages throughout Columbia County. The city of Hudson is meeting with National Grid this afternoon to discuss the restoration efforts. 

Report Power Outage to National Grid: https://www1.nationalgridus.com/outages

View the Outage Map: https://outagemap.ny.nationalgridus.com/

You can also notify the Mayor’s Office by emailing mayoralaide@cityofhudson.org 

If there is an emergency, call 911. 


Oct 08,2020

Dog Control Officer RFPs

The City of Hudson’s present contract for Dog Control Services expires December 31, 2020.

Therefore, the City of Hudson requests, from interested persons, written proposals to provide Dog Control Services, for the period January 1, 2021 through December 31, 2021.

The following services required by the city, but not limited to, are as follows and should be included in your proposal:

1)  Enforcement of Article 7 of the NYS Agriculture & Markets Law and Chapter 70, Article 1 of the Hudson City Code.

2)  On a twenty-four (24) hour daily basis, on call for the seizure of stray, abandoned or loose dogs which are found on the streets and other public places.

3)  Respond to calls by the Hudson Police Department for assistance when needed.

4)  Issue appearance tickets to owners of unlicensed dogs.

5)  Patrol the streets of Hudson at least twice a week.

6)  Make random visits to the Hudson Dog Park to confirm any dogs present have current valid licenses at least twice a week.

Written proposals shall be submitted to the City Clerk on or before November 13, 2020.

Please contact City Clerk, Tracy Delaney, at (518) 828-1030 if you have any questions or need further information.


Oct 02,2020

Fill Out Census Now

Stand up and be counted. Complete your census questionnaire online at my2020census.gov. Or attend the October 3 Hudson Connects event and fill it out in person. Census enumerators will be at the event starting at 11 AM. Or call 844-330-2020, 844-468-2020 (En Español), or 844-467-2020 (TDD)

The census is constitutionally mandated and foundational to our government. Political representation is apportioned based on the census. In addition, funding for local infrastructure and services depends on an accurate census.

FUNDING DEPENDS ON ACCURATE CENSUS

The census data is used to fund many of our most important government programs including:

  • Medical assistance
  • Nutrition assistance
  • Highway and transit funds
  • Education, including Pell grant, school lunch, school breakfast, head start
  • Economic assistance, including Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF), Section 8, foster care, child care, low-income energy assistance, workforce training, community grants, social services, AmeriCorps
  • Disaster recovery
  • See full list

CENSUS AND PRIVACY

Census data is private and all data is anonymized before being released. Census employees take an oath to safeguard the data, there are significant fines for any violation. Government agencies, outside the Census Bureau, only have access to the public, anonymized data.

SECOND HOMEOWNERS

For second homeowners, respond to the Census for each housing unit. For your primary home, respond with number of people in your household. If you have an additional home, respond for the second home and put 0 persons (or more if there are other residents).

PARTICIPATION RATES

You can track our rates here https://2020census.gov/en/response-rates.html


Sep 29,2020

Mayor Johnson Appoints Police Commissioner

Mayor Kamal Johnson appoints Shane Bower as Police Commissioner. Bower served in the Hudson Police Department from 2001 to 2019, when he retired as Sergeant. He held positions of School Resource Officer and Juvenile Aid Officer. He was also a certified Field Training Officer, a Fire and Accident Reconstruction Investigator, and was a part of the Law Enforcement Bike Patrol. He is a certified Motor Vehicle Investigator, a Highway-Rail Grade Crossing Collision Investigator as well as being part of FEMA’s Incident Command ICS, 200, 300, and 700. 

Bower brings the experience of several departments and organizations. Prior to working at the Hudson Police Department, he worked at the Ulster and Chatham Police Departments. He has been a volunteer firefighter since 2002 and is a certified Diver for their Rescue Dive Team and an NYS Level I Fire Investigator.


Sep 23,2020

Hudson Connects Demonstration Project

On Saturday, October 3, 2020 9 AM to 6 PM, you’re invited to help improve pedestrian safety and ADA accessibility. Paint The Streets With Us!

The Hudson Connects project team invites you to help install temporary projects that improve pedestrian safety and ADA accessibility for people of ALL ages and abilities.

These two temporary projects will be implemented at the intersections of Front + Warren Street and North 2nd + State Street. Each location was selected with direct community feedback the project team has been collecting since July, 2020.

hudson connects

The projects will test the potential to make permanent improvements to both intersections, which would be included in the final Hudson Connects Implementation Plan, funded by the State’s Downtown Revitalization Initiative, and to be constructed in 2021.

VIEW FLYER

HUDSON CONNECTS OVERVIEW

The Hudson Connects demonstration and pilot projects will provide short-term and low-cost improvements to two Hudson intersections. The goal of the two projects is to test out potential streetscape enhancements that could be built permanently using DRI funds. The two projects are also intended to increase awareness of the Hudson Connects project and provide an opportunity for local Hudson residents to get further involved in the planning process. 

Public and City departmental feedback will be collected over the coming weeks and months in order to assess what project elements work well, and what may need to be reconsidered should one or both projects be included as priority projects to be built with the City’s DRI funds in 2021. 

Demonstration and pilot project sites were identified by community members who have participated in the Hudson Connects walking tour, kick-off workshop, focus group conversations, the Promenade Hill Park open house, and the project survey. Given existing conditions, the project timeline, budget, and public feedback, the demonstrations project will focus on two  intersections: Front and Warren, and North 2nd Street and State Street.

FRONT AND WARREN 

The demonstration project at Front Street and Warren Street intersection will include three large painted curb extensions, which will slow down turning vehicles, allow people walking and rolling in wheelchairs to be more visible to motorists, and shorten the crossing distances from one side of the street to the other. Temporary sidewalk ramps will also be installed so that those with physical disabilities, strollers, luggage, shopping carts etc. will have an easier time moving from the street to the sidewalk and vice-versa. This project will use inexpensive and temporary materials that likely will be removed within a week or so, offering just enough time for City leaders, residents, and the consultant team to assess the merits of the changes. 

NORTH 2ND AND FRONT 

The demonstration project at North 2nd and Front Street intersection will include painted curb extensions as well as high-visibility crosswalks to enhance driver awareness. A painted sidewalk along the north side of State Street will encourage cars to slow down while also connecting pedestrians from the North 2nd and State Street intersection with the entrance to the Bliss Towers park and playground where currently there is no sidewalk. Finally, midblock curb extensions will be paired with the existing crosswalk over State Street, between the park entrance and the sidewalk on the south side of the street, so that people walking or rolling are more visible and have less distance to cross. This project will use more durable materials and be intended to last several months to a year. 

LEARNING AND PLANNING 

The feedback received and lessons learned from both of these projects will be used to inform if and how they and other projects like them may be included in the priority plan to implement permanent streetscape improvements as party of the DRI process.

If interested in volunteering to install either of these projects, email john@streetplans.org.

LEARN MORE ABOUT HUDSON CONNECTS


Sep 22,2020

Community Sailing

Sign up for a free 1-hour sailing trip on the Schooner Apollonia. Sign up for Sunday, September 27 at 3:00 PM, Sunday, September 27 at 4:00 PM, Sunday, October 4 at Noon, or Sunday, October 4 at 1:00 PM.

In addition to the carbon-neutral shipping of freight and cargo, the Apollonia helps communities engage with the Hudson River. See what it's like to hoist the sail, be on the river, and view Hudson from the water. Learn about the ecology, economy, and history of the Hudson River. Or just sit back and enjoy the sail.

Reserve your seat by texting 518-303-6060. Participants will have a physically distanced seat on the boat. Participants must wear a mask and maintain physical distance. Life jackets are provided.


Sep 19,2020

Statement on Police Commissioner

On September 19, 2020, Mayor Kamal Johnson released the following statement:

"I have received and accepted the resignation of Police Commissioner Pete Volkmann. I’m thankful for the work that was accomplished during his nine months as Commissioner. Moving forward, we will continue our work to improve public safety as well as police-community relations. I will continue to work closely with the Hudson Police Department, the Police Reconciliation & Advisory Commission, and Transitions to Treatment. As the great John Lewis would say always forward never back."


Sep 15,2020

Mayor Johnson and Andrew Yang Town Hall

Mayor Johnson and Andrew Yang will host a town hall on September 17 at 5pm. Join Andrew Yang, former presidential candidate and founder of the Humanity Forward Foundation, and Mayor Kamal Johnson for a conversation universal basic income, the HudsonUP UBI pilot program launching in Hudson this fall, and other economic and social issues. Tune in to the virtual town hall at the following links on YouTube or via Facebook.


Since its formation in March, the Humanity Forward Foundation has provided millions of dollars in financial assistance to American families. The organization is now partnering with the Spark of Hudson, a learning and training center in Hudson, N.Y. set to launch in 2021. 

HudsonUP is a five-year UBI pilot program that will provide 25 randomly selected Hudson residents $500 each month for five years. Residents of Hudson, N.Y. can now enter for their chance to be randomly selected for the HudsonUP universal basic income project. Deadline for entry is September 20, 2020.


Sep 14,2020

Minority and Women Owned Businesses Award Announcement

Galvan Foundation and Mayor Kamal Johnson announced the  award of $100,000 in grants to 13 minority and women owned small businesses in Hudson and Columbia County. The initiative aims to support the long-term growth of minority and women-owned businesses. The businesses selected to receive grants each show great potential to expand over the coming years.

“Galvan Foundation believes everyone deserves to have a home in this city and a chance to thrive. Minority-owned businesses are the heart of Hudson. With these grants, we are proud to play a role in ensuring that these businesses can overcome challenges, serve our community, and grow,” said Dan Kent, the Galvan Foundation’s vice president of initiatives.

“COVID-19 has challenged our city and our businesses like never before, but we won’t let the crisis prevent Hudson’s entrepreneurs from striving and succeeding. The Galvan Foundation has stepped up, and with its help these 13 businesses will be able grow their business. I look forward to seeing all they will contribute to our community,” said Hudson Mayor Kamal Johnson.

The 13 businesses that will receive grants totaling $100,000 are:

  • 3J Customs, custom printed apparel and promotional products
  • Chimba Art, high-quality artwork prints on canvas
  • Collins Kitchen, family-owned catering and delivery business specializing in Caribbean cuisine
  • Grandma's Kitchen, soul food catering company planning to expand to a storefront location after more than 50 years in operation
  • Hazel’s Essentials, all-natural hair and skincare products along with wellness workshops
  • I’m Beauty Store, cosmetics, haircare and beauty products
  • Janet Oar, sustainably manufactured furniture and other products
  • LYF Fitness, fitness classes and customized personal training
  • M&J’s Unisex Hair Salon, barbershop and training site with a focus on community
  • Martin Audio Video Services, creative video services specializing in online marketing for small businesses
  • Shakesphere's, custom cakes, baked goods, and signature infused berries
  • The Eagle, fresh food and groceries, specializing in Hispanic products
  • What's Really Good, serving barbecue for 10 years with plans to upgrade to a food truck
Learn about additional business and ecomoic support opportunities. 

Sep 06,2020 sloop-650

Free Waterfront Program

On Sunday, September 6, Schooner Apollonia and Sloop Clearwater host a free community event at the Hudson Waterfront. From 1 PM to 5 PM, The Clearwater offers on-shore, hands-on participatory activities. These cover topics including the aquatic life and history of the Hudson River. Also, The Clearwater will offer deck tours

Join The Apollonia for sailing trips at 2 PM, 3 PM, or 4 PM. Participants will watch the crew raise sails, shut down the engine, and navigate by sail past the Hudson Athens Lighthouse. These trips are designed to be a safe introduction to boating on the Hudson River. Also, they will give everyone the experience of leaving and arriving in their home port from the water.

sloop_topH2_SStanne

Launched in 1969 by legendary folk singer and activist Pete Seeger, Hudson River Sloop Clearwater has long been part of the environmental movement as champions of the Hudson River. To date, more than half a million people have experienced their first real look at an estuary’s ecosystem aboard the sloop Clearwater.

The Apollonia was recently recognized by Scenic Hudson for its environmental mission.

All activities will follow physical distance and safety guidelines and are free of charge.


Sep 02,2020

Short Term Rental Regulations

Here is the latest version of the Short-term rental law that will be discussed at the next Common Council Informal Meeting on September 8th:

Short-Term Rental Regulations Proposed Local Law (9/4/2020)



On Wednesday night, August 26th, at 6:15 PM, the Legal Committee of the Common Council will meet to discuss the latest (and we hope last) version of the short-term rental regulation, which is attached here.

Short Term Rental Regulations Proposed Local Law DRAFT
Regulation of Short Term Rentals Presentation


Links to articles that provide research support for the power point presentation:

The economic costs and benefits of Airbnb: No reason for ...

www.epi.org › publication › the-economic-costs-and-b...

 

The economic costs and benefits of Airbnb: No reason for local policymakers to let Airbnb bypass tax or regulatory obligations | Economic Policy Institute

www.epi.org

Analysis shows that the costs of Airbnb expansion to renters and local jurisdictions likely exceed the benefits to travelers and property owners. Thus there is no reason policymakers should reverse long-standing regulatory decisions simply to accommodate the rise of a single company.


https://hbr.org/2019/04/research-when-airbnb-listings-in-a-city-increase-so-do-rent-prices

 https://www.forbes.com/sites/garybarker/2020/02/21/the-airbnb-effect-on-housing-and-rent/#4ee491582226

 http://hcdpa.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/Hudson-Strategic-Housing-Plan-2018.pdf

 https://airbnbwatch.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/01/FACTSHEET_AFV_Airbnb-Impact-on-Housing-FINAL-1.pdf

 https://comptroller.nyc.gov/reports/the-impact-of-airbnb-on-nyc-rents/

 https://www.chathamnewyork.us/document_center/Zoning%20Code/FAQ%20STR%20May%2016%202019%20bb%20minor%20changes.pdf

http://blogs.ubc.ca/canadianliteratureparkinson/files/2016/06/How-Airbnb-Short-term-rentals-disrupted.pdf



North Elba / Lake Placid Short-Term Rental Assessment


Sep 02,2020

Universal Basic Income

Apply for the Hudson Universal Basic Income Program

Residents of Hudson who are above the age of 18 and earn less than $35,153 each year (median annual income of the city of Hudson) are eligible to be selected for the Universal Basic Income program. Participants may be single, married, with children or without. Selection will be conducted via a random lottery weighted by equity factors and overseen by independent researchers at the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Tennessee Knoxville.

The deadline to apply is September 20, 2020.


About the Program

HudsonUP is a basic income pilot created by The Spark of Hudson and Humanity Forward and based in Hudson. The initiative is being designed in collaboration with the community and Mayor Kamal Johnson.

It is important to build a resilient, “trickle-up” economy that works for everyone. The concept of a universal basic income is a simple one: unconditional, regularly recurring payments made to everyone. With HudsonUP, The Spark of Hudson & Humanity Forward aim to partner with the Hudson community to test this simple concept by providing $500 each month to 20 randomly-selected Hudson residents for five years.


Sep 01,2020

2020 Election Information

Election Day is November 3, 2020. Register to vote, apply for an absentee ballot, and learn more. 

Due to COVID, every eligible voter may vote by absentee ballot. To vote absentee, you must first apply for an absentee ballot.

Aug 25,2020

Public Space Improvements

On Tuesday, August 25, the City of Hudson invited residents to a design open house at Promenade Hill Park to meet the consultant teams working on two ongoing projects: Hudson Connects and the renovation of Promenade Hill Park. At the event, participants reviewed preliminary design concepts and provided feedback on both projects. 

Starr Whitehouse is the design consultant on the Promenade Hill Park renovation. The design team gave a presentation displayed project designs with four accompanying boards. These materials included two concept-level design alternatives. The team also distributed surveys to members of the community in attendance to gather feedback on the design concepts that were shared.

The Promenade Hill Park survey can be completed online until September 8.

Street Plans and Arterial presented on the Hudson Connects street improvements. They reported on existing street conditions and types of possible improvements. They also suggested six possible pilot projects and asked participants to vote for their priorities. 

Learn more about the DRI projects 


Aug 24,2020

K.I.S.S. - Keeping Identities of Seniors Safe

8/31/2020 - 9/11/2020
Monday - Friday 8:30AM - 4:00PM
*** Please call for an appointment - 518-828-1030***
Hudson City Hall
520 Warren St
Hudson, NY 12534

The Columbia County KISS Program is once again available to seniors in every town in Columbia County.  The KISS Program, founded by Columbia County Clerk Holly Tanner, stands for Keeping the Identities of Seniors Safe.  It was designed to protect the identities of our seniors while assisting them in the shredding of their sensitive materials.  Seniors are encouraged to contact their local Town Hall for hours of operation and more information on the program. Justin Weaver, Columbia County Clerk’s Records Services Manager, is overseeing the program and can also be contacted with any questions at 518-822-0143.

For Additional information click here.

To view the Item Retention Guideline and Disposal list click here.


Aug 21,2020

Reporting to the New York State and Local Employees' Retirement System

Resolution No. 5 of August 18, 2020

The New York State Retirement System requires that all elected and appointed officials, who are members of the retirement system and are not in a time & attendance system; maintain records of activities for three consecutive months within 150 days of the start of a new term or appointment.

The Retirement System also requires the municipality to post the approved resolution to the city's website for a minimum of 30 days.

Resolution No. 5 of August 18, 2020

Aug 19,2020

Clearwater at Waterfront Wednesday

On August 19 from 4 PM to 7 PM, the iconic sloop Clearwater will be providing free deck tours, live fish demonstrations, music, and interactive river lessons. The Clearwater is visiting Hudson as part of the Waterfront Wednesday. 

sloop_topH2_SStanne

Launched in 1969 by legendary folk singer and activist Pete Seeger, Hudson River Sloop Clearwater has long been part of the environmental movement as champions of the Hudson River. To date, more than half a million people have experienced their first real look at an estuary’s ecosystem aboard the sloop Clearwater.  

Waterfront Wednesdays runs on Wednesdays from 4 PM to 8 PM at the Henry Hudson Waterfront Park. There is m
usic, vendors, food, and boat tours. The program adheres to COVID-19 safety protocols. Please wear a mask and keep your distance from others. Waterfront Wednesday will continue on August 26. 
 
Photo Credit: Steve Stanne

Aug 18,2020

Public Space Projects Design Open House

The City of Hudson invites the public to a Design Open House at Promenade Hill Park during the evening of August 25, 2020 to meet the consultant teams working on two projects: Hudson Connects and the renovation of Promenade Hill Park. At the event, participants will review preliminary design concepts and provide feedback on both projects. Public input is an important part of the design process, and will ensure that the designs of both projects meet the needs and desires of the community.

“We need to ensure more people can access our public parks, our waterfront, and our streets,” says Mayor Kamal Johnson. “I encourage everyone to participate and share your priorities.” 

This outdoor event will be held at the plaza at Promenade Hill Park. It will begin at 5 PM on August 25, and conclude by 8 PM. Participants must wear a mask and stay six feet apart. Precautions, including having hand sanitizer available, will be taken to make this a safe event for all attendees. Light refreshments will be provided. Attendees are encouraged to register for the event at this link: https://www.facebook.com/events/962401880943751/

The Hudson Connects Implementation Plan and the renovation of Promenade Hill Park are part of a broader revitalization effort within the City. In 2017, the City of Hudson was selected by the New York State’s Capital Regional Economic Development Council for one of ten Downtown Revitalization Initiative (DRI) Round Two awards. $10 million in state funding was awarded to government and private projects to revitalize the project area, a portion of which is being used to produce and implement these two projects.

Hudson Connects is a streetscape improvement implementation plan focused on the area between the Hudson River on the west and Second Street on the east, the South Bay wetlands to the south, and Dock Street to the north. The Hudson Connects project will identify the cost/benefit of various street design improvements, and prioritize long- and short-term capital improvements that best maximize the resources of the City’s DRI budget. Ensuring that bicyclists, pedestrians, transit riders, drivers, and other roadway users have safe and comfortable access to the District’s existing and future amenities is central to the City’s economic development goals, and is the core focus of this streetscape planning and design initiative.

Promenade Hill Park renovations will make the upper promenade accessible for people of all ages and abilities, while preserving the historic fabric of the park, improving recreation opportunities, and enhancing plantings. Construction will begin this winter, and will be completed by December 2021.

More about the DRI Projects


Aug 18,2020

200 Days

On August 17, 2020 Mayor Kamal Johnson issued the following statement. 

Dear Hudson,

Since we have now surpassed 200 days of my term, I decided it was time to formally reach out again. From having to navigate a global pandemic and endure a financial crisis to civil unrest on a global level, I am proud of our city for coming together with compassion and creativity to find ways to support each other.

At the height of the virus in the Spring, Hudson remained below 30 positive cases. We kept our numbers low because our citizens found new and innovative ways to provide meals to each other, to sew masks (a huge thank you to Perfect10), to help keep everyone safe, and to support our local economy by shopping, eating out, and interacting with each other in safe, socially distant ways. As City officials, we have strategized and implemented new plans week after week in order to keep our citizens and our employees safe.

I would like to thank Future Hudson for helping us to improve our messaging and spearhead some important initiatives. Future Hudson partnered with Hudson Hall to devise a plan, through the Safe Streets program, to help give our local businesses the opportunity to open back up in a safe manner for everyone. The initial experiment was met with mixed reviews so as a community, we are continuing to tailor it to meet the needs of all the residents in Hudson.
Speaking of community involvement, we have stuck to our campaign promise that no person can do this job alone. We have more citizens of Hudson on boards and committees than ever before. These committees include a broad and diverse group of citizens serving important roles such as the Police Advisory and Reconciliation Committee, which is working to guide my office on the best solutions to police reform for our city.

On the heels of a nation dealing with civil unrest and craving change, we chose to be proactive instead of reactive. We stood together and spoke about the need for reform of our police systems. We held a socially distant nonviolent rally to serve as an example that we lead, we do not follow. I stood side by side with officers and the community to acknowledge that the system is flawed and there is a lack of trust in our communities of color and of those with lower socioeconomic means.

This is not anti-police but pro-human race.

We are looking for ways to help those in need, especially those dealing with serious mental health issues and substance abuse. I hosted two convenings in partnership with the Greenburger Center which were attended by city and county judges, the Hudson Police, county officials, and all the organizations providing mental health services in our county.

Our goal was to determine where we can use support and where the gaps are in the services we provide when it comes to those who they have struggled to reach. I have to say I was disappointed that our District Attorney and Sheriff’s office was missing from both meetings. I look forward to working with them in the future to serve our most disadvantaged populations.

Housing remains an issue in Hudson and is one that my administration will continue to hold as our highest priority. Housing is a Human Right. The history of our city is created by people who have lived their life here and put their stamp on our city. They tell the stories that make Hudson a great place to live. We owe it to them and others to keep them here in Hudson.

The Galvan PILOT remains a focus and one step for my administration’s housing plan. It has been no secret that our city has seen a large displacement in citizens due to gentrification. The only way our city can thrive is by making it equitable for everyone. We cannot accomplish this without action.

I partnered with the Galvan Foundation to create a MWVBE Grant (Minority, Women, Veterans). These grants will help support businesses and entrepreneurs from our local community by giving them opportunities to thrive and provide vital services to our community.

During the first half of the year, we made history with our partnership with the Spark of Hudson and former Presidential Candidate Andrew Yang’s Humanity Forward organization and becoming one of the first long-term universal based income initiatives on the East Coast. This program will provide 25 recipients with $500 a month for five years. This program will also provide those recipients with financial literacy and opportunities for personal and financial growth. We are also working with our local Department of Social Services to ensure that any possible recipient will not lose any benefits participants may be receiving. My administration prides ourselves on our community partnerships and giving back to the people of our city.

I’m extremely proud of the work of our city departments. City Hall continues to provide all of our services with safety precautions in place. Our Youth Department is one of the few programs across the county providing programming. With 20 sites across, the Youth Department programs are promoting social distancing and giving our youth opportunities for much needed social interaction and community engagement.

Our Senior Center restructured its services to provide programs virtually and is now beginning to offer some classes at outdoor locations to keep our seniors engaged and healthy. The Senior Center has formed a Programming Committee to give Seniors throughout the city a voice in determining the types of programs offered to work to create a vibrant center that strategically addresses the needs of the community.

DPW is working around the clock to support every department in the city as they transitioned to more outdoor programming and as the city began the Shared Streets initiative. They keep the city running on every level taking care of our most essential needs.

Our Fire Department is always on standby risking their lives to protect our city. I watched firsthand what they had to put their bodies through during the horrific fire on Allen St. Their dedication to our community deserves our utmost respect.

The Hudson Police Department collaborated with the Youth Department to support their bike program and is working with our Senior Center to offer opportunities on an ongoing monthly basis to work together to identify types of fraud, create systems to address the opioid crisis, and to provide a community liaison to our Seniors to address individual needs. They have worked collaboratively with the Advisory Committee to build trust and accountability throughout our community. I greatly appreciate the hard work on they do day after day on behalf of everyone in our city.
The Downtown Revitalization Initiative Grant is in full swing and we have made progress on all projects. We have so much more to accomplish in our city and I’m looking forward to continuing to serve the rest of my term collaborating to meet our goals. Our city hosted NBC’s The Today Show with Al Roker and is premiering on NBC’s 1st Look starring reality star Johnny Bananas in the fall. Hudson is bound for more spotlight.

My personal favorite event of this summer would have to be our amazing Black Lives Matter Mural created by over a dozen local artists in collaboration with the Hudson Catskill Housing Coalition. Our city is a light of solidarity and hope as we work to address unjust systems that have historically and intentionally disenfranchised people. These systems continue to affect their lives in harmful often traumatic ways. I even got a firsthand lesson in the 2nd amendment in Kinderhook.

Together, we can create an equitable city.

We are not yet the land of the free for all but we will be because we are the home of the brave.

Sincerely

Honorable Mayor Kamal Johnson


Aug 17,2020

North 7th St Affordable Housing Project

Review of PILOT Agreement Announced By Hudson Common Council

Independent study will assess the property tax exemption plan for the N. 7th Street Affordable Housing Program.

Hudson’s Common Council President Tom DePietro announced on April 27 that the Council has commissioned the Benjamin Center for Public Policy Initiatives at SUNY New Paltz to conduct an analysis of the PILOT agreement for the proposed Seventh Street affordable housing project. The study is expected to be completed within four weeks, in advance of the Common Council’s vote on the project. 

Common Council approval is required before the housing developer can move forward to secure the necessary funding from New York State Home and Community Renewal (HCR), the state’s affordable housing agency. 

The Galvan Foundation, developers of the proposed affordable housing project, is underwriting the study. 

“The Common Council is committed to increasing affordable housing in Hudson,” said President DePietro. “At the same time we need the expertise of the Benjamin Center to analyze the costs and benefits of the PILOT agreement.” 

A tax abatement agreement between the city and the developer, known as a PILOT (Payment In Lieu of Taxes) is typical of affordable housing development projects. 

The N. 7th Street affordable housing project’s proposed PILOT agreement covers 95% of the intended square footage, and excludes the remaining 400 square feet of commercial space. 

“The Council takes its due diligence seriously,” added President DePietro. “Bringing in the Benjamin Center for an impartial review of the PILOT agreement is part of exercising that responsibility.”

# # #

More about the Project

Currently on the desks of the Hudson Common Council is a proposed resolution entering into a PILOT (Payment In Lieu Of Taxes) with the Galvan Foundation. It would allow them to pursue the financing needed to build more than seventy units of housing at different levels of affordability. 

This page collects the relevant documents and also invites further questions and comments from the people of Hudson.

                                                                  # # #

The Benjamin Center of SUNY/New Paltz has completed its study of the proposed PILOT for the Galvan sponsored housing development at North Seventh Street in Hudson.  The Common Council commissioned the Center, which is an independent institute for public policy initiatives.  (6/8/2020)

Evaluation of the Proposed 7th Street Project PILOT


Questions and Answers

Following are a series of questions and answers (some edited for clarity) from recent emails from Council members, the public, and the Galvan Foundation: 

Could current Hudson residents receive preference for the more affordable units?
Galvan is open to such a preference, if the community calls for it.

Could the number of units below 80% of Average Median Income (AMI) be increased?
The City of Hudson passed a community-driven Strategic Housing Action Plan (SHAP) which identified the need for mixed-income housing. The plan clearly calls for housing that does not concentrate poverty in a single neighborhood. The income mix is designed to further the goals identified in the SHAP. 

Why is this plan being presented to the Council at this time?
Both the PILOT and the project itself are in step with the goals and action plan with SHAP, which was ratified by the Common Council more than a year ago. The project is seeking highly competitive state funding. An important scoring criterion is demonstrating project readiness, and the best way to demonstrate readiness is to submit local approvals with the application. 

What will be the involvement of New York State?
The developer is seeking funds from the Homes and Community Renewal agency of New York (HCR). They will provide oversight in a number of ways. They will assure that the project conforms to the RFP and design outlines. If the application is funded, the HCR must approve all finance and construction documents. During the construction, HCR will be on-site at least every two weeks to monitor the progress and approve payments.

Is there any other involvement of HCR?
Yes. Before the building is occupied, the office of fair housing at HCR approves the marketing and rent plan. Once occupied, their asset management team makes sure income restrictions are met, finances are properly managed, and tenant issues addressed.

Is HCR the only oversight?
No. The investors and lenders are also involved in creating the documents, monitoring construction, and ensuring occupancy conforms to IRS regulations.

Is there a provision to ensure that tenants are full-time Hudson residents?
Yes. Both state and federal law require that the apartment be the tenants’ primary residence. 

If inflation runs at roughly 3% per year, why is this project planning on 2% for its payment increases?
Rent increases are also projected at 2% and do not track ordinary inflation. Other project expenses are projected to escalate at 3%. 

Why is this PILOT being considered by the Common Council and not the Industrial Development Agency (IDA)?
Article 11 of the New York State Private Housing Finance Law allows the creation of a specialized not for profit corporation whose purpose is to provide low-income housing.  Under this provision, the City is authorized to grant the tax exemption.

Who are the investors mentioned in the proposal?
The developer is pursuing conventional and permanent financing from banks. 

Is this an “opportunity zone investment”?
No. 

Will the commercial space enjoy the benefits of the PILOT?
No. The four hundred square feet of commercial space will be assessed at market rate, and provide an estimated $16,000 in tax revenue beyond the $77,000 promised by the PILOT.

                                                         #  #  #

Additional Comments (5/26/2020): 

1)   Do the people currently in need of housing in Hudson (in other words, those our alder-people and mayor, and we have in mind when we call for affordable housing) actually make enough money to live reasonably in these apartments? 2) Can we see a side by side of what people pay in Bliss, the Terraces, places on Columbia St. and what they would pay for a place of comparable size here? If they have a 2 bedroom, a 2 bedroom etc. 3) Alderwoman Garriga talked about people paying $200 a month currently. Are there units at that price point? Will the people she's hoping to see housed be able to afford apartments of appropriate capacity here? 4) How will the building and site integrate, at the planning stage, with the rest of the city's open spaces? What sort of collaboration will be planned in terms of design and urban planning for the open spaces? What sorts of walkable or bikeable access routes to other vital places like the library, Oakdale Lake, the Youth Center, the waterfront, will be planned and built? 5) How will the planning, architecture, and construction of the building move the city forward in terms of walkability, play space, outdoor space, climate resilience? 6) What other community activities will be planned and integrated into the building to ensure its connection to the rest of Hudson?
- Tamar Adler


I firmly believe that this project shouldn’t go forward if the number of units below 80% AMI aren’t increased. I don’t believe this questioned was answered and people needs housing regardless of how the power elite define poverty concentration. Could the number of units below 80% of Average Median Income (AMI) be increased? The City of Hudson passed a community driven Strategic Housing Action Plan (SHAP) which identified the need for mixed income housing. The plan clearly calls for housing that does not concentrate poverty in a single neighborhood. The income mix is designed to further the goals identified in the SHAP.
- Quintin Cross

 
1) Who set the scope or parameters of the review to be conducted 2) Who determined that the developer be the party who pays for the review of the project 3) Is the Common Council (CC) aware that having the developer pay for the study of the developer's project creates the appearance of a conflict of interest if not an actual conflict of interest, as well as the appearance of impropriety if not an actual impropriety 4) Is it equitable to taxpayers and residents of Hudson to approve a 40 year PILOT on this 77 unit apartment building when only last year the city reassessed real estate of private property at rates of over a 100% increase causing many homeowners and small business owners to suffer an increasingly unsustainable tax burden 5) Will the CC consider the scores of existing residential properties that the developer owns and/or manages in Hudson, many empty, as the answer to the need for affordable housing, instead of building a somewhat mammoth new structure that will require increased infrastructure and use of current resources 6) Is the CC aware that the fiscal future of NYS is uncertain at this time, and that committing to a 40 year PILOT at this time is possibly unwise 7) Why is there such a rush to move forward on such a large project when the citizens of Hudson cannot attend live CC meetings, and are unable to have interactive participation with their elected officials 8) Has the CC not yet heard of Zoom? 9) Has the CC accepted at face value the developer's statement that it has switched the site of the proposed project from a vacant lot to a site where 3 houses stand? The developer appears to contend that this new site is one that can be readied more quickly, however, it would involve demolishing three homes. 10) Does't the C see the discrepancy in the many months long discussions about demolishing 2 houses by Stewarts, and the rush to commit to the PILOT plan which includes demolish 3 homes 11) If the reported statement by the mayor that he does not know the specifics about the developer's other projects, and only knows about the proposed PIOLT is true, what does the CC think this statement means? When proposing to enter into a 40 year agreement, with a partner, it is reasonable to expect that the person proposing the project, here the mayor, would have done his due diligence. Has he?
- Janet Kealy

 
--I FOILEd the City 7 days ago and rececived no response. Is the City' FOIL officer not working? --Does the Mayor believe that Galvan paying for a so-called assessment of the PILOT program is not a major conflict of interest? --COT program is not a major conflict of interest? --Can such a report be considered "independent"? --How many 40-year PILOTs have been given by the City of Hudson? --How many vacant apartments owned or controlled by Eric Galloway or any of his companies are there in Hudson? How long have they been vacant? --Has the City done an economic analysis of the impact of Gallooway rental rates on the price of apartments in the City? --Has the City done an economic analysis of the impact of the property tax on rental rates in the City? --Has the City done a needs assessment for "affordable housing" in Hudson? --Has the City done a background check on Eric Galloway and his businesses? --Is the Mayor aware that Eric Galloway's business entities are headquartered in New York City? --Does the Mayor know about the court case Baptist Churches v. Galloway? https://www.leagle.com/decision/2000363271ad2d921342 --What's the rush to get this proposal adopted? --It took Stewart's two years to get its tax-paying gas station and store expansion approved. Why does this non-taxpyaing proposal, with an incredible 40-year tax reprieve get rushed through in one month? --And why does it get rushed through when three-quarters of the City of Hudson is shut down? The worst economic depression in 70 years?
- Sincerely peter meyer 


How many tenants are there in the existing houses which will be demolished? Will they be rehoused in the new building and will that reduce the number of new units available? Where will the displaced tenants be housed during demolition and construction?
-Elsa Leviseur


Regarding the PILOT for 7th Street can you clarify that 1) $77K is the annual real estate payment? 2) what are the school taxes for the project? Why are they not included in the expenses? 3) how was the time frame determined? Other PILOTs have much shorter timeframes such as 15 - 30 years.
-Tracy Young

 

The PILOT is too long. The project is too large. The taxpayers of Hudson cannot sustain a project that does not pay its fare share of taxes. The tax payers are already stressed from the last re-va. The School is looking for a large increase in School Taxes this coming year asking for yet more money from already overburdened tax payers of Hudson--this 7th Street Galvan project will contribute little to the relief of an already over-taxed ever diminishing group of property owners who pay the bulk of taxes. The water and sewer bills have recently increased for example--will each unit pay the same as all the residents in Hudson? Perhaps such a give away should require the City of Hudson to make serious cuts in the budget. Also tearing down houses to make way for this project seems out of keeping for preservation of the character of Hudson as the comprehensive plans suggest. Plans change that is understandable but the plan has already changed by moving from one side of the street to the other--and the number of stories have changed. Embarking on such a project during the time of a pandemic crisis seems foolish. We have no ability to voice our concerns in person and we are asked to trust that this deal is a sound one--when the council seems like it has been left out of the process. Big housing projects in a 2 square mile city like Hudson seem to be out of fashion--the trend has been to find ways to make the housing stock fit in scale with this little city--80 units in one concentrated space is not in the City's comprehensive plan--if I recall correctly. Quote from the Hudson Comprehensive Plan: Develop a Housing Strategy While many of New York State’s urban communities are struggling with strategies to attract middle-class residents, Hudson has already started to attract this group. The challenge for Hudson is to develop a strategy that continues to provide for an ethnically and economically diverse community. Hudson’s housing strategy should seek to develop a “balanced” mix of housing types that encourages a mix of incomes as well as ethnicity and housing tenure throughout the City. Hudson’s continuing revitalization is likely to coincide with increases in the cost of housing (including housing values and rents). For the most part, this increase in value will be a very good thing for Hudson. However, the challenge for local decision-makers, the business community and neighborhood residents will be to ensure the benefits of Hudson’s resurgence are shared among all community members. Specifically, the adverse consequences of community success (rent increases and displacement of families no longer able to afford living in Hudson) must be anticipated and effectively addressed. A coordinated, multi-tiered approach must be developed involving the City, the private sector and not-for-profit organizations such as Housing Resources. For example, if the fire departments are consolidated in a single facility, the City may consider offering the fire houses as a package for redevelopment. Then the City can require that a percentage of units be reserved for low- to moderate-income residents. The City should also take advantage of the Department of Housing and Urban Developments Hope VI program, which has been developed to help communities rebuild Urban Renewal era public housing projects into mixed-use, mixed-income communities. Many communities are using this program to demolish obsolete public housing projects and rebuilding affordable housing in ways that promote human interaction and public open space. (For more detail on HOPE VI programs see http://www.hud.gov/offices/pih/programs/ph/hope6/) As the City develops its housing strategy, the following should be considered as a framework. 1) Develop a strategy for transferring in rem properties ß Streamline process for transfer of in rem properties to minimize length of vacancy ß Develop proposal process and requirements in line with community vision for neighborhood revitalization ß Develop detailed guidelines for prioritizing proposals/bids for the properties (i.e. ownership tenure requirements, set asides for mixed- income projects) ß Market program to the public *water & sewer bills Fees for these services, PER UNIT---Water & Sewer Rents, are set by the Common Council each year and billed quarterly to owners of the property. Present Rates $49.00- Sewer $61.00 - Water Per Quarter. (Non Metered) Hel
- Linda Mussman

 

Hello, Thank you for sharing. Why are there no renderings or site plans beyond the sketch up model in wireframe mode? It does not show materials, scale or neighborhood context. I imagine the developer/ designer has drafted site plans that show the building footprint in the context of the neighborhood. They should also have renderings and sections showing the building elevation relative to neighboring properties. The text presentation in ppt is semi helpful but does not show enough of the proposed design for anyone to understand what this looks like. Could we ask the developer to show the drafted plans and renderings in more views and details?
- Britt Zuckerman

 

I understand the need for affordable housing, but do not feel it appropriate for taxpayers subsidized rents through a PILOT for people making up to 90K a year. Many homeowners make less than this, and your are forcing people of lower income to subsidize rents for people with a higher income than themselves. Also I believe it sets a bad precedent for the city to allow construction of new large scale urban buildings. I would be more in favor of investigating the use of existing buildings for affordable housing projects. The pocket book factory, John L, the apartment building on 5th and Union St could all be good sites. John L is huge, could hold many apartments and would be a fantastic site that has a gym, kitchen, parking lot, etc  Why is it necessary to give tax breaks that lead to the demolition of perfectly good houses while we have huge structures sitting vacant? It makes no sense. Other things could be done, increasing the lodging tax and using part of the money to subsidize rents, or giving tax breaks to owners who convert their B&B to affordable housing units. I believe allowing the construction of this large apartment building will only lead the the construction of more buildings and the continued urbanization and congestion of the city which in the long run would degrade the entire community to the detriment of everyone.
- Tim SLowinski

 

The amount of units in this proposal and its previous iteration seem very specific, is this based on community need or developer profits? Have any studies been performed to quantify the current vacancy rate, existing unused and offline units, or other measures which would validate or inform the scale of this proposal? The existing houses on this street are occupied and in good shape, why is the city of Hudson demolishing existing housing and displacing tenants? What measures will be taken to protect the tenants of these units? The setbacks do not conform to local codes. If this proceeds it has the potential to greatly increase the population of the area, what services will the city of Hudson be providing in response to this (schools, groceries, public transportation, public green space)?
- Maxfield Schnaufer


This project is so very, very wrong in many ,many ways. 40 year PILOT - What ! That's insulting to every property tax payer in Hudson No parking spaces - What ! Hudson has a huge parking problem right now that is being swept under the carpet. Hudson's share of the PILOt is $22,000 per year. I pay over half that amount on my property. And don't forget the economy is in freefall with an unknown recovery time. all projects of this enormous size should be on hold until there can be truly PUBLIC meetings. Finally, does anyone read these? In my experience Aldermen do not respond to their email. Does anyone at City Hall ?
- Pamela Kungle

 

This new image has dramatically changed from the first proposal, which seemed somewhat fit for the neighborhood. This building is simply too big and ugly. Not to mention the sketchy tax plan. It seems that this and some other architectural plans are too modern and inconsistent with the flavor of Hudson. This image in no way reflects the history and design of the Pocketbook Factory. One of the reasons I moved here was for the charm and architectural beauty of Hudson. I think the leaders of Hudson need to be very thoughtful about approving plans, historically, aesthetically and financially.
- Sher Stevens

 


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Aug 14,2020

Universal Basic Income

Mayor Kamal Johnson discusses HudsonUP, Hudson's Universal Basic Income Pilot. Additional presenters include Susan Danziger and Albert Wenger, co-founders of The Spark of Hudson + HudsonUP, and Joan Hunt, Project Director of the Greater Hudson Promise Neighborhood.

August 14 at 4 PM
Watch

HudsonUP will provide $500 each month to 25 Hudson residents over the next 5 years. The program is being designed to benefit the community of Hudson and demonstrate the power of basic income for all.


HudsonUP & the History of Universal Basic Income
Thursday, August 20, 2020 at 6 PM – 7 PM

The Hudson Area Library and The Spark of Hudson present an informational meeting on the history of Universal Basic Income (UBI) and HudsonUP, a current UBI pilot program based in Hudson. Albert Wenger and Susan Danziger, co-founders of The Spark of Hudson and HudsonUP, will speak on UBI's history and the value and details of the UBI pilot program for Hudson.Q & A will follow.

The meeting will be held on Zoom. To register, email programs@hudsonarealibrary.org or call 518-828-1792 ext 101.

Aug 12,2020 hudson-connects

Hudson Connects Survey

Give your feedback for Hudson's streetscape improvement project. 

If you couldn’t make it to the first public workshop for Hudson Connects and view the July 29 presentation about the City’s streetscape improvement implementation plan, the project team has published an online survey for you to give your initial feedback.

The Hudson Connects planning effort is focused on the area between the Hudson River on the west and Second Street on the east, the South Bay wetlands to the south, and Dock Street to the north. The 12-question survey asks which streets you feel comfortable walking and biking on, and what improvements you think should be made to increase bicycle and pedestrian access and safety. Your responses will help the project team understand what currently enables or prevents safe mobility around the neighborhood, and where to focus investment in street infrastructure improvements.

Aug 12,2020

Housing Rights and Resources

If you are at risk of displacement, get legal and financial support so you can stay in your home.

Jul 26,2020

Americans with Disability Act Awareness Day

The City of Hudson extends greetings and best wishes to all observing the historic recognition of the civil rights for persons with disabilities. 

The City of Hudson recognizes July 26, 2020 as Americans with Disabilities Act Awareness Day. The ADA was passed on July 26, 1990. The City of Hudson affirms the principles of equality and inclusion for persons with disabilities.  

Learn more about City of Hudson's ADA work

Jul 24,2020

Mayor Johnson Appoints Shared Streets Advisory Committee

The Shared Streets advisory committee is made up of city stakeholders to solicit public input and advise the Mayor on future orders affecting the Shared Streets program.

Zachary Bayman has managed and developed boutique and luxury hotels. He is currently the CEO of The Maker Group, which owns and operates The Maker Hotel on Warren Street in Hudson.

Marianne Courville is co-owner of Hudson Wine Merchants (16 years) and The Hudson Standard (6 years). Courville has sat on the board of Hudson Hall for several years and volunteered as a yoga instructor for Perfect Ten and Daytop Village.

Christopher Draghi is a board member of the Hudson Business Coalition and co-owner of Source Adage Fragrances on Warren Street. Prior to moving to Hudson and opening a business, Draghi worked in art direction and branding design for hospitality, fashion, and textile brands.

Kristin Koskowski is a native of Hudson and has worked in the Human Services field for the last 20 years. At this time her main focus of work is with Children and families within Hudson and surrounding areas. Kristin studied Psychology with a focus on substance abuse after graduating from Hudson High School, while further earning several certifications in similar areas of expertise. Kristin volunteers in her community and sits on several committees, both professionally and personally in her home town and is an active member with St. Mary’s Church/Holy Trinity Parish.

Elizabeth Moore is a founding partner of The Gilded Owl, a design shop on Warren Street and the Director of Elizabeth Moore Fine Art, a private art gallery that functions out of her home at 105 Warren Street. Elizabeth has been a full-time resident of Hudson since 2007, and has been actively involved in the art, design, and business communities while serving on the Board of the Hudson Business Coalition. Together with her colleagues on the HBC, Elizabeth conceived of and brought to life the Hudson Design Weekend, a successful fundraising event that was well attended by the community and also attracted a wide range of artists, designers, architects, and retail shop owners.

Dena Moran moved to Columbia County as a full-time resident 20 years ago and opened Olde Hudson a year later. The store has grown from a small market, through four locations, to the current Market and Cafe. Her clients are full-time Hudson residents, weekend homeowners, and tourists.

Allyson Strafella lives and works in Hudson, NY, having a private studio practice alongside her home of 18 years.

Michael Weaver was born and raised in Hudson. He is a 20-year veteran of the volunteer fire service, past Captain and currently a Lieutenant with the Central Fire Station. He is founder of the Hudson NY Public Community Board.

July 24, 2020


Jul 22,2020

Public Comments: Keeping and Raising of Chickens

On July 21, the Common Council passed Proposed Local Law Introductory No. E of 2020 – Amending the City Code to Regulate the Keeping and Raising of Chickens

Mayor Johnson is accepting public comment virtually or via the telephone for the next week. If interested in commenting on this proposed law, please submit your comments to the Mayor’s Office by calling (518) 828-7217 or emailing mayor@cityofhudson.org by Friday, July 31, 2020.

The Mayor’s public hearing requirement prior to signing proposed local laws has been suspended due to the public health emergency occasioned by the Covid-19 Pandemic.

 


Jul 22,2020 Hudson Connects Logo 650x570

Streetscape Improvement Implementation Plan

Public invited to the “Hudson Connects” Walking Tour and Workshop

July 22, 2020: The City of Hudson is kicking off Hudson Connects, a streetscape improvement implementation plan focused on the area between the Hudson River on the west and Second Street on the east, the South Bay wetlands to the south and Dock Street to the north. The City of Hudson and its design consultants, Arterial and Street Plans, will initiate the project with a public walking tour and a public workshop on July 29. Community members are encouraged to attend one or both events.

“We need to ensure more people can access our public parks, our waterfront, and our streets,” says Mayor Kamal Johnson. “I encourage everyone to participate and share your priorities.”

July 29 4:00 PM - 5:30 PM
Walking Tour 
Begins at Front Street at Promenade Hill Park 
Register at bit.ly/HudsonConnects1

July 29 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Workshop
Hudson Hall
Register at bit.ly/HudsonConnects2

 

The walking tour will begin at 4pm on July 29. It will set off from Front Street at Promenade Hill Park and conclude by 5:30pm. This participatory exercise will provide an opportunity for attendees to evaluate the safety, accessibility, and beauty of the streets in the study area. Participants must wear a mask and stay six feet apart. Participants are also encouraged to wear comfortable shoes and to bring a bottle of water. Attendees may register for the Public Walking Tour at bit.ly/HudsonConnects1

A public workshop at Hudson Hall (327 Warren St) will follow at 6pm and conclude by 8pm. The workshop will introduce the project and project team, and initiate the analysis and data collection phase of the project. Attendees will be encouraged to share feedback on the current state of the streets and vet priority projects, highlighting missing, crucial connections within/to/from the project area, and sharing what currently enables or prevents safe mobility around the neighborhood. 

In accordance with State COVID-19 requirements, the attendance for the Public Workshop portion of the event will be capped at 50 people. The room will be set up for social distancing, masks will be required, and staff will be performing contract tracing. All precautions, including having hand sanitizer available, will be taken to make this a safe event for all attendees. You must RSVP for the Public Workshop with the following link, as attendance is on a first-come-first-serve basis: bit.ly/HudsonConnects2.

Hudson Connects Logo-05


The Hudson Connects Implementation Plan is a part of a broader improvement effort within the City. In 2017, the City of Hudson was selected by the New York State’s Capital Regional Economic Development Council for one of ten Downtown Revitalization Initiative (DRI) Round Two awards. $10 million in state funding was awarded to government and private projects to revitalize the project area, a portion of which is being used to produce and implement the Hudson Connects plan. This effort will identify the cost/benefit of various street design improvements, and prioritize long- and short-term capital improvements that best maximize the resources of the City’s DRI budget.

Ensuring that bicyclists, pedestrians, transit riders, drivers, and other roadway users have safe and comfortable access to the District’s existing and future amenities, like new, mixed-use development, the Hudson Amtrak Station, Henry Hudson Riverfront Park, Promenade Hill Park, and businesses along Warren Street, are central to the City’s economic development goals and is the core focus of this streetscape planning and design initiative. Other street and mobility improvement projects include Truck Study, Shared Streets, Empire State Trail, improving sidewalks, Promenade Hill Park improvements


Jul 15,2020

Support for Minority-Owned Small Businesses

Mayor Johnson Announces New Programs to Support Minority-Owned Small Businesses, Funded by Galvan Foundation

July 15, 2020 - Mayor Kamal Johnson announced that the city will be providing $50,000 in grants to minority-owned small businesses and free technical assistance to minority entrepreneurs. The City is coordinating the technical assistance program, which is expected to include support with business planning, marketing, accounting, bookkeeping, human resources, website development, and financing.

The programs are made possible by a $100,000 grant from Galvan Foundation to the City. In addition, Galvan announced plans to partner with the City to create a $1 million revolving loan fund to provide low-interest loans to minority-owned businesses in Hudson and Columbia County.

“As mayor, my highest priority is bringing equity to our city. That means improving access to health care and housing, as well as making sure that entrepreneurs of color can successfully start and grow businesses. The programs we are announcing today will help our businesses get through these unprecedented times and thrive in the years to come,” said Mayor Johnson.

“Hudson’s business community has been hit hard by COVID-19, and for minority-owned businesses, the crisis is one more obstacle that they must overcome. We are pleased to partner with Mayor Johnson to provide immediate funding and long-term support to the small businesses that need it most,” said Dan Kent, Galvan Foundation’s vice president of initiatives.

Interested businesses should apply now. For more information, contact Michael Chameides at mayoralaide@cityofhudson.org

  • Application Link: https://airtable.com/shrLj0MIEqSGAdym4
  • Submit grant by Sunday Aug 2, 11:59 PM
  • Both existing and new businesses are eligible to apply
  • Grants are up to $10,000
  • If you prefer to submit a paper copy. Address to:

    Michael Chameides
    Mayor's Office
    520 Warren Street
    Hudson, NY 12534

    Mail or place in Dropbox at City Hall.

    If mailing, the application must be received by August 3.

9/14 Update: View the Awards


Jul 14,2020

Permit Fee Relief for Small Businesses

MAYOR KAMAL JOHNSON ANNOUNCES PERMIT FEE RELIEF FOR SMALL BUSINESSES PARTICIPATING IN HUDSON SHARED STREETS PROGRAM

July 14, 2020 – The Mayor’s Office announced today that local residents Mark and Deborah D’Arcy have generously stepped up to donate $15,000 to the City of Hudson through Hudson Hall to underwrite permit fees for local businesses participating in the Shared Streets program. The gift is intended to support small businesses and the City by offsetting lost parking revenues from the program, designed to help them through the ongoing strain of the COVID-19 pandemic by expanding into parking spaces. Mayor Johnson announced beginning July 21, 2020, and in an effort to be equitable, fees for one parking space will be waived for each business or community group participating in Hudson’s Shared Streets until further notice. For more information about Shared Streets or to apply for a permit, visit cityofhudson.org/streets.


“The Hudson Shared Streets program is an effort to expand outdoor space for local businesses to help them survive these difficult economic times,” Mayor Kamal Johnson said. “The City of Hudson is greatly appreciative of the generous donation from Mark and Deborah D’Arcy to help our local business community without further straining the City’s finances.” 

“We are so happy to support Shared Streets and hope it helps more of the wonderful small businesses in Hudson stay strong,” said Mark and Deborah D’Arcy.

“The D’Arcy’s have been fantastic supporters of the arts and creative economies in Hudson,” said Hudson Hall Executive Director, Tambra Dillon. “We’re thrilled by their generous gesture to help support businesses participating in the Shared Streets program. On behalf of everyone involved, we extend our heartfelt thanks.”

In collaboration with Hudson Hall, FUTURE HUDSON and Design for Six Feet, and with financial support from the Columbia Economic Development Corporation and The Spark of Hudson, the City of Hudson established the Shared Streets program on Warren Street to allow businesses to expand into city parking spaces to provide greater space for patrons, pedestrians and cyclists. During Shared Streets hours (weekdays from 4pm to 10pm; weekends from 11am to 10pm), vehicular traffic is slowed to 5 miles per hour to allow for pedestrians to safely share the street with cars and further encourage safe social distancing. Fees to activate parking spaces were put in place to recover the approximately $24 per meter per week in revenue the City would have otherwise received. Feedback received by the City from the business community indicated this fee could have a significant impact on already slim profit margins.   


Jul 08,2020

Police Reconciliation & Advisory Commission

MAYOR JOHNSON ANNOUNCES MEMBERS OF THE POLICE RECONCILIATION & ADVISORY COMMISSION

The City of Hudson is committed to ensuring equality, social justice, violence reduction, and accountability related to all interactions with the community, its members, and the police. Mayor Johnson is creating a Police Reconciliation & Advisory Commission (PARC) to advise on police policy and reform. 

“The organizing principle of this committee is that by working alongside our police department we can better understand our officers and, in exchange, our officers can better understand the needs of our community,” says Mayor Kamal Johnson. “Our goal is to always be proactive instead of reactive.”

The PARC is part of a larger set of policy changes and engagement initiatives designed to keep residents safe and ensure all residents equal protection. On July 15, Mayor Kamal Johnson issued Executive Order 21-20 Regarding City of Hudson Police Reforms which outlines nine actions, one of which is the PARC.

The first goal of the PARC is to produce a Reconciliation Report to advise the Mayor on the following: 

  1. The current level of community trust, both citywide and in each ward, in the Hudson Police Department, the Columbia County Sheriff’s Department, and the NYS Police

  2. Specific recent incidents (within the last 5 years), which occurred within the City involving any of these police departments that have either inspired or undermined community trust or caused a physical or emotional injury, including incidents of police brutality or misconduct, if any;

  3. The current level of job satisfaction and concerns among officers of the Hudson Police Department; 

  4. Recent incidents (within the last 5 years), of injury to police officers from any police department that have occurred while on duty in the City of Hudson; 

  5. Recommendations by community members or police officers to address mistrust or negative attitudes toward police officers and departments or the community; 

  6. Challenges associated with responding to people in mental health crises or in physical crisis due to a substance use disorder;

  7. Other issues the community or police may wish to raise or the Commission may wish to explore;

  8. Recommendations to reconcile any mistrust, negative attitudes or the physical and emotional injuries that either community members or police may have experienced.   

MEMBERS

Mayor Johnson appoints ten members to the PARC. Several of the members have successfully led progressive policy improvements within large institutions. Members have a variety of lived experiences and professional backgrounds and fairly represent Hudson’s diversity. 

Theo Anthony is a filmmaker based in Hudson, NY. His first feature documentary, Rat Film, premiered to critical acclaim, with a successful festival and theatrical run followed by a broadcast premiere on PBS Independent Lens in early 2018. His follow-up, Subject to Review was broadcast in late 2019 as part of ESPN's 30 for 30 series. He is currently in post-production on his next feature documentary, All Light, Everywhere, due out in late 2020. 

Vern Cross, a lifelong resident of Hudson, is the co-host of the popular local radio show Drive Time on WGXC 90.7. Cross is a community advocate who has volunteered his time coaching and mentoring youth in the Hudson community. He has over ten years’ experience navigating difficult conversations regarding mental health, suicide, and police/community relations.  

Elizabeth Dickey is a writer, educator, and community advocate. Before moving to Hudson in 2018, she was a volunteer crisis counselor for NYC Anti-Violence Project, a teaching assistant with Art Start, and a member of the University of Michigan's Collective Against White Supremacy.

Sgt Christopher M Filli is a 19-year veteran. He is a Hudson High School graduate. He earned his Associates Degree in Criminal Justice from Columbia Greene Community College. He is a graduate of Zone 14 Police Academy. He formerly served with Copake and Philmont police departments. He was promoted to Sergeant in December 2017. He previously served as a Detective in the Hudson Police Department. He is President of Local 3972, Council 82, NYS Law Enforcement Officers Union. He is a Bicycle Officer, member of the Cause & Origin (Arson) team, instructor development certified, and Crime Scene Investigator.

Sgt Mishanda Franklin is a 17-year veteran. She is a Hudson High School graduate and previously worked for Hudson’s Youth Department. She attended Columbia Greene Community College, University of Arizona, and New York University. She is a graduate of Zone 14 Police Academy. She was promoted to Sergeant in October 2017. She is instructor development certified, Child Safety Seat Technician, and a Bicycle Officer.

Linda Friedner is a five-year resident of Hudson, has worked as a media and First Amendment lawyer for over 30 years. Currently she is in-house counsel at Penguin Random House, where she also advises the Human Resources departments across the US and Canada. In this capacity in 2017, she co-created a company-wide anti-sexual harassment training program as well as a reporting and investigation policy. Friedner is a member of the New York Democratic Lawyers Council and conducted a poll-watcher training session in Hudson in 2016. In addition, Friedner recently worked with a group of Hudson residents to prepare an analysis of the Hudson Police Union contract and to compile a list of questions for the Police Committee of the Common Council.  

Joan E. Hunt, LMSW is the Project Director of the Greater Hudson Promise Neighborhood (GHPN) in Hudson, NY. The GHPN, a placed-based, cradle to career initiative modeled after the Harlem Children’s Zone, aims to break the intergenerational cycles of poverty and to build strong, vibrant communities. For the past 8 years, Hunt has led the GHPN, successfully building partnerships with community-based organizations, schools, elected officials, county agencies, municipalities, businesses, youth, families and faith-based organizations to address unmet needs in the Hudson community. In 2015, Hunt and the GHPN team launched the Greater Hudson Initiative for Children of Incarcerated Parents (GHICIP), a partner in Osborne’s NY Initiative for Children of Incarcerated Parents. In August of 2016, GHPN partnered with the Columbia County Jail to implement “Enhanced Child” visits, allowing children to visit with their incarcerated parents free of restrictions. This program has been a huge success and is now being replicated by other county jails in NYS. Hunt has over 10 years of experience working to reform the criminal justice systems and is passionate about advocating for the rights of those directly impacted. 

Gregory Mosley served four years in the United States Marine Corps as a Military Police and was a 1978 Graduate of the Prince George County Police Academy in PG County, Maryland. In 1979 Mosley became a New York State Trooper. He served thirty-two years with the State Police and retired as a Lieutenant. During his tenure with the NYS Police, Mosley developed the curriculum for law enforcement officers on a national level concerning Racial Profiling and Cultural Diversity. In addition, Mosley developed curriculum for Undercover Narcotic Investigation training programs, News Media Introduction to Police Training, Police Civilian Interaction Training for non-Police Officers, Sexual Harassment Training, and Ethics Training for Police Officers. Mosley served as the New York State Police Affirmative Action Chair and Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) Compliance Officer in the office of Human Resources. He is a two-time recipient of the New York State Police George M. Serial Award for the design and development of law enforcement training programs.

Dewan Sarowar is serving his second term as Alderman of the 2nd Ward. Sarowar chairs the city Police Committee. 

Officer Randy J. Strattman is a 3-year veteran. Born in Hudson and graduate of Ichabod Crane High School. He earned his Associates Degree in Criminal Justice from Hudson Valley Community College. He previously served with the Chatham police, Hudson Falls police, Glens Falls police. He is a Bicycle Officer. 

TIMELINE

The Reconciliation Report is to be presented to the Mayor by November 15, 2020. The Mayor will share the report with the Police Department by December 1, 2020 and the public by December 30, 2020. The Report will be used to develop Hudson’s Police Reform Plan (HPRP) in accordance with the Governor’s Executive Order No. 203 calling for a “comprehensive review of current police force deployments, strategies, policies, procedures, and practices, and the development of a plan to improve such deployments, strategies, policies, procedures, and practices, for the purposes of addressing the particular needs of the communities served by such police agency and promote community engagement to foster trust, fairness, and legitimacy, and to address any racial bias and disproportionate policing of communities of color.”

Following submission of the Reconciliation Report, the Commission will meet with the Mayor monthly, or as needed, to advise the Mayor on all matters related to the Police Department and Hudson’s Police Reform Plan, or as requested by the Mayor.


Jul 06,2020

City Seeks ADA Compliance Architect

The City of Hudson is requesting proposals from qualified individual licensed Architects or Architectural firms that are knowledgeable about architectural accessibility requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) to perform audits of City-owned facilities to
determine compliance with ADA regulations.
 
In 2019, the City of Hudson executed an Americans with Disabilities Act Settlement Agreement with the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ). That Agreement requires the City to hire an Independent Licensed Architect to ensure ADA compliance. The Department of Justice has also specified that the ADA Architect must function separately from architects the city uses to create and implement architectural plans.
 
City departments have been working to address all of the findings included in the Settlement Agreement. The City desires to hire an independent licensed architect and accessibility firm with experience in reviewing facilities for compliance with the ADA Standards for Accessible Design to survey City facilities and sites to identify barriers and to assist in verifying the City's compliance with the Settlement Agreement and the Americans with Disabilities Act.
 
It is a priority of the City to remove barriers and provide equitable opportunities so that people of all abilities can access City facilities and parks with ease, feel welcomed and included to participate in programs and services, and travel freely and safely at intersections
throughout the City.
View RFP Addendum #1   
Proposals are due July 22.
 

Jul 06,2020

City Seeks Affordable Housing Development Planning

The City of Hudson is requesting proposals from qualified professional consultants to assist with creating a plan for the development of affordable housing. The plan will be a collaboration between several organizations that addresses a wide variety of housing needs and types of affordable housing. The plan will review developable properties, funding opportunities, and development feasibility in order to create a document that recommends the operations, timeline, and partnerships for developing affordable housing.


Addendum #1 
Proposals are due on August 3

“Too many of our residents are struggling with housing in Hudson,” says Mayor Kamal Johnson. “Creating an affordable housing development plan is an important step to meet Hudson’s housing needs.”

The 2018 Strategic Housing Action Plan (SHAP), approved by the Common Council, identifies the need for affordable housing calls for the “production of new housing options: facilitate and support the development of new mixed-income housing activities carried out by private and non-profit developers, community groups and individuals.”

Since Hudson does not have a planner, engineer, or staff member dedicated to land use or housing, Hudson needs to look to outside support to develop affordable housing. The affordable housing development plan will help identify and solve key problems to advance the development of affordable housing.

“I’m happy to be contributing to our community and advancing this important project,” says City of Hudson Public Works Commissioner Peter Bujanow, who is managing the request for proposals. “This plan will help Hudson residents live with housing stability." 

The plan will incorporate the variety of housing needs, which include a mix of income levels as well as rental and homeownership. Not every development project in the plan needs to address every need, but the totality of the projects need to have a comprehensive impact.

“Columbia County Economic Development Corporation (CEDC) applauds Mayor Johnson and the City of Hudson for its focus on broadening affordable housing opportunities,” says F. Michael Tucker, President and CEO of CEDC. “CEDC looks forward to partnering with Hudson and Columbia County in developing a wider variety of housing units to meet the needs of all county residents.”


 

BACKGROUND ON AFFORDABLE HOUSING

DEFINING AFFORDABLE HOUSING

Housing that is affordable costs no more than 30 percent of a household income for low-income households. For renters, this includes rent and tenant-paid utilities. For homeowners, this includes mortgage, insurance, and taxes.

WE NEED MORE AFFORDABLE RENTAL UNITS

The 2017 Housing Needs Assessment concluded that there is a scarcity of good quality cost-accessible family rental housing throughout Columbia County. Hudson’s Downtown Revitalization Initiative grant application states that “43% of households pay more than 30% of their household income for housing—a standard calculation of economic strain.” This is not a new finding, Hudson’s 2012 Housing Needs Analysis found a particular lack of cost-accessible units for households with $15,000 income or less. It also found that 44 percent of renters are paying more than 35 percent of their income for rent.

Low and moderate-income tenants that find affordable housing often suffer from bad conditions and because of the housing scarcity they fear reporting the issues. They worry that they will be evicted and then will have no other option. (2017 Housing Needs Assessment)

In Hudson, available aid often goes unused because there aren’t enough affordable housing options. In addition, Hudson residents are often forced to leave Hudson in order to find an affordable place to live.

SUPPORT SUSTAINABLE HOMEOWNERSHIP

The 2017 Housing Needs Assessment concluded that there is a scarcity of good quality moderate-income owner-occupied single-family homes. Likewise, the 2012 study found “A substantial proportion of Hudson’s homeowners are ‘housing cost-burdened.’” Forty-two percent pay more than the recommended 30 percent of income to housing costs. Hudson homeownership is below the national average.

Homeownership is an important step in economic opportunity. In a 2018 study, Goodman and Mayer report “Our Overall Conclusion: homeownership is a valuable institution. On average, it allows families to build wealth and serves as a measure of financial security.”

The 2017 Housing Needs Assessment found that credit issues and lack of housing stock contributed to this problem. Second homeowners as well as younger buyers moving to the County have increased housing pressures.

Many homeowners report additional changes after the 2019 re-evaluation of property taxes, taking a difficult situation, and making it worse. 

HOUSING STABILITY HAS BENEFITS BEYOND HOUSING

Housing stability is key to creating opportunities. In a January 2018 research report by the Urban Institute, Corianne Scally reports:

“Those who need housing assistance but do not receive it face the threat of housing instability and may end up doubled up with family and friends or experiencing episodes of homelessness… Homelessness can lead to a particularly vicious cycle. Families may experience multiple stays in shelters or other homeless programs or become involved with the child welfare system. Individuals, particularly those with disabilities, may fall into a pattern of heavy use of emergency shelters, emergency rooms, and local jails.”

Alternatively, Scally notes, those who get housing assistance are less food insecure, are healthier (particularly for girls), and have better educational outcomes.

In the 2017 Housing Needs Assessment of Columbia County, school staff and administrators note how the lack of affordable housing in Columbia County poses education difficulties. Homelessness and housing instability can be traumatic for students and the school allocates staff and volunteer time and other resources to help compensate.

Housing stability is an essential component of a healthy community. We need to address this issue in order to address education, economic development, public health, and public safety.


Jun 29,2020

Public Comments: Proposed Local Laws

The Legal Committee of the Hudson Common Council hereby invites the public to comment on two DRAFT laws: one for short-term rental regulation, the other related to sidewalk improvements.  Please send your comments to john.rosenthal@cityofhudson.org.  Remember: these are DRAFTS.

Short-Term Rental Regulation Proposed Local Law (DRAFT)
Sidewalk Improvements Proposed Local Law (DRAFT)

Jun 23,2020

Truck Study RFP

The City of Hudson is requesting proposals from qualified firms to perform a destination and origin study associated with a New York State-designated truck route. The route traverses the City of Hudson and deleteriously influences the community’s quality of life and economic vitality. The study will collect data and propose alternative routes. With the completed study, the City of Hudson will work with surrounding towns, Columbia County, New York State, and stakeholders to build consensus for modification and improvement to the truck route.

“Residents need a more walkable, bikeable city, with safe streets that are accessible to all,” says Mayor Kamal Johnson. “The high-volume of large trucks through dense residential neighborhoods is the wrong route and this study will help create solutions.”

The need for a truck study is a longstanding priority for the city of Hudson. The 2002 City of Hudson Comprehensive Plan states: “The [State Truck Route is] forcing trucks to pass through residential neighborhoods and are significantly deteriorating the quality, and in some cases historic integrity, of these homes. Further, trucks are required to make turns on urban streets that were not engineered to meet their turning radius needs… Consequently, a comprehensive truck study should be accomplished.”

The 2011 Local Waterfront Revitalization Plan states “The City intends to work with State and Federal representatives to address the impact of non-local truck traffic through the City.” 

“I’m happy to be contributing to our community and advancing this important project,” says City of Hudson Public Works Commissioner Peter Bujanow, who is managing the request for proposals. “This study will help us understand the impact of current traffic patterns and identify alternatives”

“For decades, truck traffic has been a major safety and quality of life issue in the city of Hudson,” said Assemblymember Didi Barrett, who helped secure the funding for the study. “The congestion slows traffic, causes safety hazards, and leads to noise, light, and air pollution for visitors and residents. It’s also out of character with Hudson’s historic architecture and streetscape. This origin and destination study will help us collect the data to develop an informed solution.”

View the Request for Proposals (RFP)
Addendum #1
Proposals are due July 14.


Jun 23,2020

Shared Summer Streets

To help our city re-open for business and stay safe, the Hudson Shared Summer Streets Program is going to make street space available to businesses, residents, and local organizations in new ways.

Learn More

Jun 18,2020

228 Mill Street Sealed Bid Information

228 SEALED BID INFORMATION

BID INVITATION AND NOTICE TO BIDDERS

The Hudson Development Corporation invites sealed bids for the sale of surplus property located at 228 Mill Street in Hudson, NY. Bidders may download a copy of the Invitation to Bid at hudsonfirst.com. Sealed bids will be opened and either accepted or rejected at a special board meeting on August 25, 2020 at 12:00 PM.

Instructions and Application


Jun 15,2020

Police Reforms

On June 15, Mayor Kamal Johnson issued the following Executive Order. 

EXECUTIVE ORDER No. 21-20
June 15, 2020
Regarding City of Hudson Police Reforms

WHEREAS, the video recorded deaths of black Americans during encounters with police over the last half decade and the Black Lives Matter movement have made it clear that the underlying problem of police brutality is not related to individual police officers alone, but is a societal problem that will require multiple reforms; and

WHEREAS, despite more widespread use of body cameras nationwide, race and bias training, and the acknowledgment that change is necessary, George Floyd’s recent nine-minute long, agonizing and public death demonstrates that the police system has not sufficiently changed, necessitating more direct and systemic reforms to stem the violence and racism inherent in society; and

WHEREAS, the City of Hudson is not immune or exempt from this systematic racism, discrimination, bias, and implicit bias that exists throughout the United States, State and City; and 

WHEREAS, the residents of the City of Hudson are diverse, possess universal human rights and are entitled to dignity, respect and equal treatment under the law; and 

WHEREAS, the City of Hudson is committed to ensuring equality, social justice, violence reduction, and accountability related to all interactions with the community, its members and the police; and 

WHEREAS, the City of Hudson Police Department is an integral part of keeping residents safe and must serve and protect the community in a professional and unbiased manner to ensure all residents are treated equally under the law: and 

WHEREAS, the City of Hudson recognizes the danger, importance and need to support and maintain a professional police department whose members are not only well trained and trusted by residents but are supported in these efforts; and 

WHEREAS, the City of Hudson is committed to community policing targeted on violent crimes instead of low-level crimes, and to implementing the 21st Century Community Policing Strategy called for by President Obama that is based on mutual respect between residents and law enforcement; and 

WHEREAS, in order for the City of Hudson Police Department to fully carry out the mandates of this Executive Order and the 21st Century Community Policing Strategy, the City and the Department need to better publicize and in some cases revise police policies and practices to better serve the public and protect the lives, property and rights of all individuals, particularly people of color.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, Kamal Johnson, Mayor of the City of Hudson, by the authority vested in me by the charter and laws of the City of Hudson, do hereby order:

Section 1. Funding, Forfeiture Funds & the Demilitarization of the Hudson Police Department

  1. The police budget will be reduced by ten (10) percent. 

  2. No additional police officers will be hired until further notice. 

  3. A full accounting of forfeiture funds and equipment shall be provided to me for the last 3 years.

  4. No forfeiture funds will be accepted without review by the Office of the Mayor. 

  5. The City will not accept vehicles or equipment formally used for military purposes through the federal forfeiture program.

  6. Police Officers will avoid using military equipment and military-style uniforms for nonessential purposes.

  7. Effective immediately Hudson Police Officers may wear less formal attire approved by the Police Commissioner and for such duties as the Police Commissioner authorizes.    

Section 2. Reconciliation & Advisory Commission and Community Relations. 

  1. Purpose. There is hereby created in the Office of the Mayor a Police Reconciliation & Advisory Commission to be composed of 7 people including: 2 Police Officers (one Sergeant and one Police Officer), the Chairperson of the Police Committee of the Common Council, and 4 residents of the City of Hudson who shall fairly represent the diversity of the City.  Such Commission shall meet with the Mayor once a month, or as needed, to advise the Mayor on all matters related to the Police Department as requested by the Mayor.

  2. Reconciliation Report. Such Commission shall undertake a 3-month reconciliation process whereby Commission members meet with members of the community, including those communities with the highest volume of police calls, to listen and record community concerns and suggestions about police interactions within the City.  The purpose of these meetings is to give the residents of the City of Hudson the opportunity to be heard on issues related to: 1) community policing; 2) police interactions with people of color, those with substance use disorders or people in a mental health crisis; and 3) incidents of police brutality or misconduct, if any, among other issues the community may wish to raise or the Commission may wish to explore. The Commission shall also speak with all Police Officers willing to discuss these matters and shall produce a report of these meetings for the Mayor, including recommendations for addressing any concerns raised, no later than November 15, 2020.  The Mayor will share such findings with the Police Department by December 1, 2020 and the public by December 30, 2020.

Section 3. Training on Bias and Race. 

Studies have shown that most trainings on bias and race are not effective in combating systemic racism or racist or bias attitudes held by individuals. Accordingly, instead of requiring training, the City will hold quarterly 2-hour Community Conversations; two during the lunch hour and two in the evening.  All Police Officers shall be required to attend one of these sessions.  One quarter of Police Officers in the Hudson Police Department shall attend one of the sessions at one time. Such sessions shall also be attended by members of the community who volunteer to participate in the sessions. The Mayor shall select different community members to participate in each of the sessions from those who volunteer to serve. The sessions will be facilitated by an outside facilitator. The intent of these sessions is to develop understanding between both the police and the community about the issues and concerns each face related to police interactions in the community in the hope of forging better community and race relations. 

Section 4.   Transparency.

  • As per existing the Hudson Police Department Body Camera Program, body cameras will be worn and on at all times during a police interaction with a member of the public.

  • As per existing policy, the Hudson Police Department Body Camera Program, Police Officers will file a report each time they use or threaten force against a civilian.

  • Effective immediately, the Hudson Police Department Body Camera Program will include a proactive routine supervisory review of video footage and a weekly report of the findings shall be submitted to the Chief of Police.  The Chief will report the results of the review to the Mayor and indicate whether any incidents resulted in discipline or identified training needs.  The report will also be submitted to the Police Reconciliation & Advisory Commission.

  • An emergency notification system will be developed and implemented no later than July 30, 2020, to alert elected officials of major emergency incidents involving the community.  


Section 5. Use of Force and Searches. 


  1. As per existing policy, the Hudson Police Department and its Police Officers shall not employ a “chokehold” nor restrain any individual by placing a knee upon the individual’s neck, nor otherwise restrain any individual in a manner that restricts the flow of air or blood by compressing the windpipe, diaphragm, or the carotid arteries on each side of the neck. 

  1. As per existing policy, the Hudson Police Department and its Police Officers shall not restrain any individual by connecting or tying rear-cuffed hands to cuffed or shackled ankles or legs, or as such practice is more commonly known, “hog-tie,” any individual. 

  1. Effective immediately, so-called “No-knock warrants” for drug searches and other police functions where they are not essential to protect public safety, shall be prohibited. 


Section 6. Duty to Intervene. 


  1. As per existing policy, any member of the Hudson Police Department who is present and observes another member of the Hudson Police Department using force that is clearly beyond that which is objectively reasonable under the circumstances or in any way physically or verbally escalating a law enforcement interaction, shall safely intercede to prevent the use of such excessive force or escalation. 


  1. As per existing policy, any member of the Hudson Police Department who observes such use of excessive force or physical and/or verbal escalation shall promptly report such observation to a supervisor.


Section 7. Hudson Cares. 


The Hudson Police Department will implement a Hudson Cares Program to assist individuals seeking treatment for Substance Use Disorders who are seeking and will adhere to all applicable policies and standards.

Section 8. Reduce Policing of Social Issue & Implement Crisis Intervention Training.

  1. Wherever possible, policing of social issues should be limited or removed from the scope of police responsibilities. The City shall seek to convene and work with city judges, the Public Defender, the District Attorney, county officials, non-profits and directly impacted people to expand diversion options from the criminal justice system, increase funding of and access to social service agencies and services for the provision of evidence-based interventions to address substance use disorders, mental illness, and homelessness, and to expand re-entry services for citizens returning to the community following incarceration. 

  2. At least 1 member of the Hudson Police Department shall become trained in Crisis Intervention Training (CIT) no later than January 15, 2021 to provide assistance with 911 calls involving people in mental health crisis. 

Section 9.  Data Reporting. 

A) Effective immediately, the Police Chief shall cause to be collected the following data on a monthly basis: 

  1. Number of Use of Force incidents; 

  2. Number of times Police Officers intervened as per Section 6(b) of this Executive Order;

  3. Number of arrests and crimes alleged as the basis for such arrest; 

  4. Number of Emotionally Disturbed Person calls; and 

  5. Number of calls involving a drug overdose or suspected drug overdose.

B) Such data shall be reported to the Mayor and to the Chairperson of the Common Council Police Committee beginning July 2020.

This Order shall take effect immediately.


Jun 09,2020

Interpreter Service

Hudson Announces Interpreter Service, Increasing Access to Services.

Residents who need an interpreter can request an interpreter in over 240 languages, including American Sign Language, Spanish, and Bangla. For all city services, interpreters are available via phone or video.

“Our goal is universal access to city services,” says ADA Coordinator Michael Chameides. “Providing an interpreter improves accessibility and is an important step towards making Hudson an equitable city.”

To request an interpreter, please make the request at least twenty-four hours in advance. However, in urgent matters, interpreters can be arranged sooner. Residents can make the request by contacting the city service provider or by contacting ADA Coordinator Michael Chameides at mayoralaide@cityofhudson.org or 518-828-7217.

Learn more about Hudson's ADA projects 


Jun 09,2020

Affordable Housing Development Plan Draft RFP

On March 6, Mayor Kamal Johnson announced a proposal to create an affordable housing development plan. Since then the Mayor's Office drafted an RFP and it is currently being reviewed by housing organizations and agencies that may partner with the project. There will be changes to the RFP before it is issued. 

The public can submit comments by emailing mayoralaide@cityofhudson.org. 

View the Draft Affordable Housing Development Plan RFP

Jun 05,2020 promenade-650

Work Begins at Promenade Hill Park

On Monday, June 8, surveyors are scheduled to begin work at Promenade Hill Park. The surveyors will be taking measurements of the park to prepare for park improvements. Improvements include preserving historic features while providing access to park amenities and extraordinary views of the Hudson and the Catskills for people of all abilities.

“We need to ensure more people can access our public parks. Residents have been demanding park improvements for years and it’s great to be moving forward on this. I appreciate everyone who has contributed to this project,” says Mayor Kamal Johnson. 

The city asks all residents and visitors to be mindful of the workers at the park and help create a safe environment. Wear a mask and give them extra space. 

promenade-1000

The full project is scheduled to take place over 20 months. There will be an 8-month design phase that includes community outreach, creating concept designs, renderings, construction drawings, and cost analysis. The design phase will be followed by a 12-month construction phase that includes bidding, procurement of the construction contract, and construction. The city has contracted with Starr Whitehouse Landscape Architects and Proper and O’Leary Engineering for both design and construction oversight services.

“Promenade Hill Park is a magical place,” says Gail Wittwer-Laird of Starr Whitehouse. “We are thrilled to be working with the City of Hudson and the local community to restore this historic park so that it can continue to provide delight and access for all for years to come.”

The Department of Justice has identified Promenade Hill Park as a priority for ADA improvements. 

“I love visiting Promenade Hill Park—to enjoy the views and talk with people,” says ADA Coordinator Michael Chameides. “The city must remove barriers and provide equitable opportunities so that people of all abilities can access City facilities and parks.”

The Promenade Hill Park improvements are funded through a grant from New York State 

Stay up to date on Promenade Hill Park and other DRI projects by subscribing at http://www.cityofhudson.org/business/dri_documents.php

Jun 05,2020

Hudson Petitions State Supreme Court

The City of Hudson has filed a petition in the New York State Supreme Court seeking to stop the police union from demanding that the City provide millions of dollars in enhanced retirement benefits.

Current State law provides that police retirement benefits are based on the Final Average Salary (FAS) earned by a police officer during his or her last three years of service. The union seeks to use a FAS for only the last year of employment, arguably the highest-paid year of service. In the case at hand the difference between the 3-year and 1-year FAS is significant and could cause the City to go into significant debt in an already depressed economy. The City’s position is that only the 3-year FAS is allowed.

“I support unions and I'm glad that our police officers have pension benefits so they can work and retire with economic security, but State law prohibits the enhanced retirement benefits this union is seeking since it was never authorized by the City Council,” said Mayor Kamal Johnson. “Their attempt to base retirement on the final year instead of the final three years is not appropriate. It is an unauthorized benefit that will significantly harm the city and its residents. What’s at stake is millions of dollars and possibly the future of the police force in Hudson. The City had no choice but to file for a stay of the union’s request for arbitration,”

Hudson City Treasurer Heather Campbell said, “If the Union is successful in this arbitration, the City will be forced to pay over $900,000 into the State’s retirement system just to cover the past service cost of providing this enhanced retirement benefit. Thereafter, taxpayers will need to come up with an additional $75,000 or more annually, in perpetuity, to cover other officers who may also ask for the enhanced retirement.”

Albany attorney Jonathan Bernstein who is representing the City said, “Retirement benefits for public employees are established by state law which explicitly prohibits unions and local municipalities from bargaining for retirement benefits in a collective bargaining agreement. We believe the enhanced retirement provision relied upon by the union in this case is a holdover clause in the City’s current collective bargaining agreement that has no effect as a matter of law.”

“The Common Council is prepared to litigate this matter to the State’s highest court if necessary and will also be prepared to take drastic cost-saving measures to pay the enhanced benefit if the union prevails. We will have no choice,” said Common Council President Tom DePietro.

A decision in the matter is expected sometime in the fall.


Jun 05,2020

Project Hudson

The Hudson Tourism Board is welcoming proposals for short- and long-term projects that promote Hudson as an attractive destination and strengthen our local communities and economy! 
 
We invite businesses and organizations based in the city of Hudson to fill out this application online or by hand. The board will consider applications that:
  • Take place in the City of Hudson.
  • Enliven Hudson’s city life.
  • Illuminate or create a unique experience of Hudson’s communities and businesses.
  • Create local opportunities for recreation and/or promotion, and/or seek to advance walkability.
  • Create local opportunities for climate resiliency, where applicable.
  • Are accessible to all audiences and ADA compliant, where applicable.
  • Use “tactical urbanism,” which encourages low cost, impermanent, and DIY projects, where applicable.
The Tourism Board is tasked with using its funds to promote our city. With Project Hudson, the board hopes to take small steps toward supporting the creativity, ingenuity, and civic-mindedness of Hudsonians to create a more vibrant, healthy, equitable, and safe place to live and to be.  
 
This grant program is being administered with the help and support of the Columbia Economic Development Corporation.

Jun 02,2020

NY Forward

New York State issued new guidelines, including the following: 

"Effective November 13 at 10 p.m., bars, restaurants and gyms, as well as any State Liquor Authority-licensed establishment, must close in-person service from 10 p.m. to 5 a.m. daily."

See the latest NYS Guidelines guidelines


GUIDANCE ON REOPENING HUDSON


On May 20, Hudson entered Phase 1 of reopening. On June 3, Hudson entered Phase 2. On June 17, Hudson entered phase 3. On July 1, Hudson entered Phase 4. Residents and businesses should continue to follow physical distancing best practices.

The Governor has broken the State into 10 Regions. Hudson is in the “Capital Region.” Each region will reopen its businesses in 4 Phases with 2 weeks between the opening of each new Phase. Phase I openings cannot begin until the region meets 7 metrics. The Capital Region has met 7 of 7 metrics.

Each re-opening business must develop a written Safety Plan outlining how its workplace will prevent the spread of COVID-19. A business may fill out this template to fulfill the requirement or may develop its own Safety Plan. This plan does not need to be submitted to a state agency for approval but must be retained on the premises of the business and must be made available to the New York State Department of Health (DOH) or local health or safety authorities in the event of an inspection.

PHASES OF REOPENING

Phase I
Construction Manufacturing
Wholesale Trade
Select Retail for Curbside Pickup Only
Agriculture, Forestry, and Fishing

Phase II
Professional Services
Finance and Insurance
Retail
Administrative Support
Real Estate, Rental and Leasing

Phase III
Restaurants and Food Services

Phase IV
Arts, Entertainment and Recreation
Education

Learn more

New York State has recently added a Reopening Tool, designed to let businesses know when they may reopen in a particular region.


COMEBACK COLUMBIA

The Columbia County Comeback Committee was formed by the Columbia County Board of Supervisors to assist Columbia County businesses as the county looks ahead to the re-start of business activities. The Committee has been tasked to serve as a resource for county businesses to navigate the new normal and develop initiatives to
help business owners adapt and respond once the State allows businesses to re-open. Mayor Kamal Johnson is serving on the committee.

Businesses can also contact the Columbia Economic Development Corporation for additional support.

COMPLAINTS

Every business in operation needs to follow a safety plan. View the NYS know your rights guide. New Yorkers can call the Coronavirus Hotline at 1-888-364-3065 or file a complaint online if they believe their employer is not following PPE, hygiene or social distancing guidelines as more businesses begin to reopen. If the employer is in the city of Hudson, you can also contact the Code Enforcement Office.

TESTING

If you have a job that puts you in contact with people outside your household, consider getting tested for coronavirus.

LEARN MORE ABOUT HUDSON'S RESPONSE TO CORONAVIRUS


May 28,2020 docks

Waterfront Docks

May 28, 2020: Docks for boats and kayaks are being installed at the Henry Hudson Waterfront Park. These docks are for short-term boat and kayak use.

Stopping the spread of the coronavirus is a shared responsibility. Please do your part to help keep Hudson safe. 

PHYSICAL DISTANCING

When using the docks, maintain 6' between you and others. Take turns using the dock. Since the dock is less than 6' feet wide, do not enter the dock when another person is on the dock. When you are on the dock, be respectful of your usage so others can have a turn. 

Please use physical distancing guidelines when on your boat as well. Keep a distance of six feet from others outside your household. Wear a mask when near others outside of your household.

docks-large
DO NOT CONGREGATE ON DOCKS

No fishing or hanging out on docks.

NO SWIMMING

Swimming is not allowed.

SHORT-TERM USE

No overnight docking

FREE

There is no charge for using the docks

STATE BOAT LAUNCH

Boaters may also want to use the NYS State Boat Launch, located to the north of the Henry Hudson Waterfront Park.

Learn more about Parks and Recreation


May 28,2020

Police Commissioner Letter

On May 28, 2020 Police Commissioner Peter Volkmann issued the following statement.

To the Citizens of Hudson

As Police Commissioner of the City of Hudson, I am responsible to the citizens of Hudson as well as to the officers of Hudson Police Department. The recent event in Minneapolis in which every person was able to witness the death of a person in police custody was shocking to say the least. The slow response of police transparency is tragic and has caused a collective conscious reevaluation of police responsibilities in training and internal investigations in their communities and within their police agencies. I have always strived to be a better cop, better leader, and better person. While I have not been perfect and have personally made mistakes in my career, I have always separated between a "mistake of the head" and a "mistake of the heart". Supervision and training can retrain "mistakes of the head", but "mistakes of the heart" cannot be retrained. "Mistakes of the heart" is a human deficiency that is ingrained forever in a person due to life experiences. Policing, whether with the community, or within the agency, is about confrontation and dealing with issues that may be uncomfortable in nature.

This Minneapolis situation has made America uncomfortable.

Let me begin this uncomfortable conversation on behalf of Hudson Police. The arrest tactics utilized in Minneapolis has never and will never be an aspect of Hudson Police training nor tolerated if utilized as an arrest tactic by any officer. Hudson Police has been trained and will continue to be trained on proper use of force techniques. Our guidelines are clear and concise on the use of force standards to follow. As a NYS accredited police agency, our policies and training standards have been recognized by NYS to be of high standards. Any type of complaint on an officer will be fully investigated and properly resolved. As Police Commissioner, I will take professional responsibility for all officers' actions within Hudson Police. I have confidence in their training standards, supervision, and abilities when utilizing use of force. If there is an identified issue or mistake, we will as an agency investigate how that issue happened and evaluate the best way to correct the issue. Solutions are the result of first acknowledging there is a problem. Community conversations lead to community solutions. If a police agency cannot have uncomfortable conversations with community problems, whether perceived or real, those problems will only get worse. I will let the community know that Hudson Police has a body camera program in place for almost a year. Every on-duty patrol officer wears a body camera. Officers are trained to record any use of force incident. The audio and video recordings provide transparency to our community. This month we will examine the program for any needed immediate adjustments or enhancements. 

As an agency, Hudson Police will evaluate our community policing efforts within the next month. We will strive to be better in communicating with our community, collaborating with other city departments and agencies to serve Hudson, and provide a real sense of service to our community problems. We all can take responsibility to do better for Hudson

One of my many responsibilities as Police Commissioner is to have Hudson Police available for conversations with the community. Once the COVID-19 emergency declaration is lifted, I will invite the community to tour our police facility. The police facility belongs to the citizens of Hudson and everyone should have an opportunity to see the facility. We can have neighborly conversations

Commissioner Peter Volkmann 


May 26,2020

June 1 Parking

Effective June 1: all parking meters and alternate side parking will be restored.

On-Street parking meter fees will be 25 cents for 30 minutes of parking.

On March 19, alternate side parking and use of parking meters were temporarily suspended.

Learn more: 
Parking Rules & Regulations
Parking Bureau

May 22,2020 1024px-COVID-19_2871

COVID-19

Coronavirus updates including health recommendations, links with information on the virus, information on the city of Hudson's response, and recent emergency orders. You can also sign up for email notifications.

Mayor Johnson urges everyone to stay at home. If you must leave the house, keep a safe distance of six feet from others in public spaces to reduce the spread of the Coronavirus.


You should automatically redirected to the COVID-19 page. If not, click the button below.


May 21,2020

Hudson Safe

HUDSON RESIDENTS PARTNER WITH CITY OF HUDSON TO STOP THE SPREAD OF COVID-19


The city of Hudson has teamed up with two local organizations to develop a civic health campaign to promote safe physical distancing as a way of showing love for Hudson.

The campaign is called Hudson Safe, and was created by Hudson residents Peter Spear and Jonathan Lerner of FUTURE HUDSON, and Alison Matheny of BEST Creative Studio.

The Hudson Safe campaign kicks off with new signage at parks. The signs give clear direction of actions that people need to take, infusing a positive, community-minded tone.

IMG_9175 In the coming week, more posters will be going up around town encouraging residents to “Do Your Part. Stay Home. Stay Six Feet Apart. Wear a Mask.”

OUR COMMUNITY’S SAFETY DEPENDS ON WIDE PARTICIPATION

Until there is a vaccine, the most effective way of stopping the spread is for individuals to take responsibility for the health and well-being of their neighbors. 

We can protect ourselves by protecting each other.

The goal of HUDSON SAFE is to inspire civic pride and reinforce basic safe behaviors — staying home, keeping distance, wearing masks. The message is underscored by a consistent appeal to Do your part. 

COVID-19 is causing damage. How we respond can strengthen our communities.

Printing costs were generously covered by the Berkshire Taconic Community Foundation's Columbia County Emergency Fund.

The campaign was inspired by The City of Rochester’s “Six Feet Saves” campaign created by Partners + Napier and made available to the public.

The three were encouraged by the Mayor’s Office and worked with the City on clear messaging. The campaign also has the endorsement of the County Health Department. 

Anyone can help support the campaign by wearing a Hudson Safe button, displaying a poster in their window, or posting on social media.

And, if anyone would like a poster for your window, have ideas on how Hudson Safe can further support the community, or would like to know more, please email Peter Spear at peterbspear@gmail.com.

Learn more about the city of Hudson's COVID-19 Response


May 20,2020

Resolution No. 15 of May 19, 2020

The New York State Retirement System requires that all elected and appointed officials, who are members of the retirement system and are not in a time & attendance system; maintain records of activities for three consecutive months within 150 days of the start of a new term or appointment.

The Retirement System also requires the municipality to post the approved resolution to the city's website for a minimum of 30 days.

Resolution No. 15 of May 19, 2020

May 19,2020

Livestream Congressmember Antonio Delgado & Mayor Kamal Johnson

Hudson Shared Summer Streets

Virtual Town Hall
Thursday, June 11 at 4 PM
Learn More


Town Hall #3

Wednesday, May 20, 3:30 PM

Mayor Johnson speaks with Congressmember Antonio Delgado about the Direct Support for Communities Act, the economic stimulus, and other efforts to address our community's needs.

Town Hall #2

Friday, April 24, 2:00 PM
Meeting participants include City of Hudson Mayor Kamal Johnson, Hudson Common Council President Tom DePietro, Hudson Housing Authority Chairman Randall Martin, Columbia County Department of Health Director Jack Mabb, Columbia County Chairman Matt Murell, Assemblymember Didi Barrett (D-Dutchess/Columbia), Maria Suttmeier, Hudson City School District Superintendent and Hudson Police Chief Edward Moore.

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Town Hall #1

Friday, April 10, 2:00

Meeting participants include City of Hudson Mayor Kamal Johnson, Hudson Common Council President Tom DePietro, Housing Housing Authority Chairman Randall Martin, Columbia County Department of Health Director Jack Mabb, Columbia County Chairman Matt Murell, and Columbia Economic Development Corporation President Mike Tucker.


May 17,2020

2020 Property Assessment

2020 Property Assessment Information has been released to the public. The assessment information values each property in Hudson, which is used to determine the portion of taxes for each property owner.
 
You can file a grievance and attend a May 28 virtual grievance meeting. If filing a grievance, property owners are strongly encouraged to file a grievance as soon as possible.
More information:
518-828-3141
Assessor's Office

May 12,2020

Take 5 for Hudson

We are calling on all Hudsonians to take five minutes everyday to call, text, or direct message a loved one, friend, neighbor, or acquaintance. Say hi, check on them, see if they need anything, lift their spirits, and show them support.
 
While this is a difficult time for all of us, it is taking an even greater toll on seniors, people living alone, and those living with depression, anxiety, and addiction. Connect with people in our community who could use it the most. You can talk about the crisis or the latest show you’re watching. The point is that we are staying safe together.

take 5-03

#Take5ForHudson

LEARN MORE ABOUT HUDSON'S RESPONSE TO CORONAVIRUS

May 05,2020

Public Comment: Sidewalks and Curb Ramps

Provide your input on the accessibility of curb ramps and sidewalks in Hudson. Give feedback via an online form where you can describe the problems and also submit pictures. The city will use the information to respond to requests and document those responses, and, to where necessary enforce the obligations of property owners to maintain and repair pedestrian level walkways consistent with local ordinances including Municipal Code 22-18. The City of Hudson will maintain all data received in this process.

File A Report

Apr 24,2020

Public Comments: Proposed Local Law Introductory No. D of 2020

 

The Mayor is considering signing Proposed Local Law Introductory No. D of 2020 and is accepting comments until Friday, May 8, 2020 at 5:00pm.  If you are interested in commenting on this proposed local law, email Mayor Kamal Johnson at mayor@cityofhudson.org OR call the Mayor's Office at 518-828-7217 and leave a message if no one is there to take your call.


Proposed Local Law Introductory No. D of 2020 - A Local Law Establishing an Alternate Date for the Meeting of the Board of Assessment Review.

The Common Council passed the proposed local law unanimously on 4/21/2020.

The Mayor’s public hearing requirement prior to signing proposed local laws has been suspended due to the public health emergency occasioned by the Covid-19 Pandemic.


Apr 22,2020

Hudson Emergency Order

Pursuant to New York State Executive Law, Article 2-B, Section 24, Mayor Kamal Johnson declares and proclaims a Local State of Emergency in the City of Hudson, New York beginning November 23, 2020 at 12:00 PM.

Local State of Emergency Proclamation (11/23/2020)
Local State of Emergency Order No. 27 (11/23/2020)


On August 14, 2020, Mayor Johnson issued an Emergency Order regarding Hudson's response to coronavirus.  

LOCAL STATE OF EMERGENCY PROCLAMATION

Pursuant to New York State Executive Law, Article 2-B, Section 24, I hereby declare and proclaim a continuing Local State of Emergency in the City of Hudson, New York and extend the Emergency Proclamation issued on July 8, 2020 an additional 30 days until September 14, 2020. This Proclamation shall remain in effect for a period not to exceed thirty days or until I rescind such Proclamation, whichever occurs first. 

This State of Emergency is based upon the emergency conditions set forth in the Governor’s March 7, 2020, Executive Order Number 202, declaring a State disaster emergency for the entire State of New York related to the uncontrolled contagion of the novel coronavirus known as COVID-19 and further, that these conditions persist and both travel-related cases and community contact transmission of COVID-19 have been documented in New York State and are expected to continue.

This Emergency Proclamation also may be supplemented or clarified from time to time by the issuance of Executive Orders as deemed necessary to address emergent issues and situations that require immediate attention. Executive Orders may be issued for a period of up to 5 days. 

Due to the continuing threat of contagion and the concomitant disruption to routine activities and everyday life of the citizens of Hudson, the local economy, particularly the restaurant, bar, arts and retail sectors have been devastated.  As the state is operating under a controlled re-opening of the economy, these sectors are facing restrictions on their operations and occupancy thus impacting their ability to continue in business. 

To support local businesses which are crucial to maintaining the City’s tax base and governmental services during this on-going emergency, I hereby Proclaim and Order  the continuation of the Shared Summer Streets Program begun pursuant to Executive Order 26, as modified by the Emergency Proclamation dated July 8, 2020, and as further modified herein for the duration of this Emergency Proclamation and I intend to extend this authority to continue the Shared Summer Streets Program for additional 30 days periods until such time as the COVID-19 pandemic abates. 

Now therefore, I further Proclaim that:

  1. The purpose of the Hudson Shared Summer Streets Program is to reduce traffic on Warren Street by limiting it to two-way local traffic, reducing traffic speed and making parking spaces on Warren Street available for restaurant/bar seating or the display and sale of retail or craft merchandise.
  2. The Shared Summer Streets Program shall be on Warren Street from Front Street to 7th Street.
  3. Partial Street Closure. 
    A) In effect until August 23, 2020. On Mondays thru Fridays from 4:00 PM until 10:00 PM  and on Saturdays and Sundays from 11:00 AM until 10:00 PM until August 23, 2020, the Hudson Police Department and Department of Public Works shall coordinate in the posting of barricades and signs notifying vehicle drivers that Warren Street is open to local traffic only within one-block of the intersection and that the speed limit is 5 MPH

    B) In effect commencing on August 24, 2020. The traffic slowing methods on Warren Street, including the placement of barricades at the Warren Street intersections and the reduction in the speed limit to 5 MPH shall only be in effect on Fridays from 4:00 PM until 10:00 PM and on Saturdays and Sundays from 11:00 AM until 10:00 PM.  The Hudson Police Department and Department of Public Works shall continue to coordinate to post the barricades, signs and posted speed limit.

    C) Local traffic is defined as traffic associated with people who reside or operate a business on Warren Street, individuals with disabilities who require accessible parking to shop on Warren Street, those who are picking up or dropping off food or other merchandise from a business operating on Warren Street or public transportation.

    D) Barricades shall be posted at each intersection crossing Warren Street from Front Street to 7th Street. 
  4. The owner of each business on the first floor of a building on Warren Street may apply for a permit to occupy the parking space directly in front of said building. Applications may be made to the Hudson Police Department on a form to be prepared by the Police Department.
  5. Restaurants and bars may apply for permits to occupy parking spaces adjacent to the parking spaces directly in front of their establishments. No permits shall be issued to restaurants and bars for parking spaces across the street from their establishment.
  6. Non-appurtenant businesses and individuals may also apply for permits to occupy parking spaces. Permits may only be issued to Hudson businesses and individuals. No permits for food trucks, food carts or other vendors shall be issued for the Shared Summer Streets area of Warren Street except for any current permits or completed applications for a vendor permit pending on this date. 
  7. Where there is a conflict in the request for permits for parking spaces the Chief of Police shall resolve the dispute giving preference to the business owner directly adjacent to the parking space. The Chief of Police shall also apply the requirements of §307-5(E) of the City Code which prohibits vendors from selling a product within 100 feet of a store selling the same or a substantially similar product.
  8. The Chief of Police shall have the discretion to reserve spaces for parking, delivery, persons with disability and emergency vehicle access.
  9. The permittee shall delineate the parking area to be occupied with stanchions and ropes or other similar means of separating the area from traffic on Warren Street. Permittees planning on using the parking space after sunset shall place reflective traffic cones or an equivalent means of providing a visual warning to vehicle drivers at the corner of the parking area. Beginning on August 24, 2020 and lasting for the duration of the Shared Streets Program, any permittee wishing to use a parking area Monday thru Thursday when traffic slowing measures on Warren Street are not in effect, must have installed a substantial barrier designed to protect patrons consistent with the attached “Design for Outside Dining” dated July 2020.
  10. Permittees must maintain a 4 foot-wide unobstructed area on the sidewalk for pedestrian passage.
  11. Use of the parking spaces by patrons is prohibited after 10:00 PM. Restaurants and bars shall stop serving patrons within the parking spaces by 10:00 PM and use best efforts to have the area vacated as soon as possible thereafter.
  12.  All applicants must provide a hold-harmless indemnity to the City and provide a certificate of insurance naming the City of Hudson as an additional insured on the applicant’s general liability policy in the amount of $1,000,000 per occurrence and $2,000,000 aggregate.  For all applicants wishing to serve alcohol in the designated parking area, the business shall also provide a certificate of insurance naming the City as an additional insured on their Liquor Legal Liability insurance.
  13. Permittees are responsible for securing all tables, chairs, umbrellas and any other equipment used in the parking lot or sidewalk areas.  Any umbrella or other means of providing shade shall be anchored in accordance with manufacturer’s specifications.
  14. Permittees are responsible for maintaining waste receptacles on their property and directing patrons to use these receptacles. 
  15. Permittees are permitted to use generators limited to inverter type with a maximum capacity of 3500W and must not exceed a noise level of 60dB.
  16. Amplified outdoor music is prohibited in the parking spaces or the exterior of the business.  Speakers may not be placed outside of the building or placed in windows directed outside of the building. 
  17. Permittees will be allowed to leave fixtures and materials in the permitted parking space when Warren Streets is open and not partially closed under condition 3 above. Patrons and customers are not permitted in the parking space when Warren Street is open except as provided in condition 9 above. 
  18. Due to a generous contribution from a pair of Hudson residents, there will not be a permit fee for the Shared Summer Streets program. 
  19. Enforcement. 

    A) The Hudson Police Department shall have the authority to enforce this Order by issuing a written warning to any person or entity in violation of this Order. Upon a second violation of this provision the Chief of Police shall revoke the parking space permit for a period of one week. The business owner may apply for reinstatement after the one-week revocation period.  If the business violates this Order again after reinstatement, the permit shall be revoked for the duration of the Shared Summer Streets program. Any permittee may appeal a revocation order by filing a written appeal with the Mayor’s office within 72 hours of the issuance of the revocation order.  Any appeal must include sworn statements supporting any claim that the permit should not be revoked.

    B) Notwithstanding paragraph (A), all relevant provisions of the Hudson City Code, including the Hudson Noise Control Code (Code Ch. 210) remain in effect.

    C) Furthermore, in addition, pursuant to N.Y. Exec. Law § 24, any person who knowingly violates any local emergency order of a chief executive promulgated pursuant to said section is guilty of a class B misdemeanor.  
  20. All permits for the Shared Streets Program previously issued pursuant to Emergency Orders or Proclamations are hereby continued subject to the permittee having currently valid certificates of insurance on file and operating consistent with the terms of this Proclamation.


On July 8, 2020, Mayor Johnson issued an Emergency Order regarding Hudson's response to coronavirus.  

LOCAL STATE OF EMERGENCY PROCLAMATION

Pursuant to New York State Executive Law, Article 2-B, Section 24, I hereby declare and proclaim a continuing Local State of Emergency in the City of Hudson, New York and extend the Emergency Proclamation issued on June 22, 2020 an additional 30 days until August 7, 2020. This Proclamation shall remain in effect for a period not to exceed thirty days or until I rescind such Proclamation, whichever occurs first. 

This State of Emergency is based upon the emergency conditions set forth in the Governor’s March 7, 2020, Executive Order Number 202, declaring a State disaster emergency for the entire State of New York related to the uncontrolled contagion of the novel coronavirus known as COVID-19 and further, that these conditions persist and both travel-related cases and community contact transmission of COVID-19 have been documented in New York State and are expected to continue.

This Emergency Proclamation also may be supplemented or clarified from time to time by the issuance of Executive Orders as deemed necessary to address emergent issues and situations that require immediate attention. Executive Orders may be issued for a period of up to 5 days. 

Due to the continuing threat of contagion and the concomitant disruption to routine activities and everyday life of the citizens of Hudson, the local economy, particularly the restaurant, bar, arts and retail sectors have been devastated.  As the state is moving to a controlled re-opening of the economy, these sectors are facing restrictions on their operations and occupancy thus impacting their ability to continue in business. 

To support local businesses which are crucial to maintaining the City’s tax base and governmental services during this on-going emergency, I hereby Proclaim and Order  the continuation of the Shared Summer Streets Program begun pursuant to Executive Order 26, as modified herein, for the duration of this Emergency Proclamation and intend to extend this authority to continue the Shared Summer Streets Program for additional 30 days periods until such time as the COVID-19 pandemic abates. 

Now therefore, I further Proclaim that:

  1. The purpose of the Hudson Shared Summer Streets Program is to reduce traffic on Warren Street by limiting it to two-way local traffic, reducing traffic speed and making parking spaces on Warren Street available for restaurant/bar seating or the display and sale of retail or craft merchandise.

  2. The Shared Summer Streets Program shall be on Warren Street from Front Street to 7th Street.

  3. Partial Street Closure.  

    1. On Mondays thru Fridays from 4:00 PM until 10:00 PM  and on Saturdays and Sundays from 11:00 AM until 10:00 PM for the duration of this Proclamation, the Hudson Police Department and Department of Public Works shall coordinate in the posting of barricades and signs notifying vehicle drivers that Warren Street is open to local traffic only within one-block of the intersection and that the speed limit is 5 MPH.

    2. Local traffic is defined as traffic associated with people who reside or operate a business on Warren Street, individuals with disabilities who require accessible parking to shop on Warren Street, those who are picking up or dropping off food or other merchandise from a business operating on Warren Street or public transportation.

    3. Barricades shall be posted at each intersection crossing Warren Street from Front Street to 7th Street. 

  4. The owner of each business on the first floor of a building on Warren Street may apply for a permit to occupy the parking space directly in front of said building. Applications may be made to the Hudson Police Department on a form to be prepared by the Police Department.

  5. Restaurants and bars may apply for permits to occupy parking spaces adjacent to the parking spaces directly in front of their establishments. No permits shall be issued to restaurants and bars for parking spaces across the street from their establishment.

  6. Non-appurtenant businesses and individuals may also apply for permits to occupy parking spaces. Permits may only be issued to Hudson businesses and individuals. No permits for food trucks, food carts or other vendors shall be issued for the Shared Summer Streets area of Warren Street except for any current permits or completed applications for a vendor permit pending on this date. 

  7. Where there is a conflict in the request for permits for parking spaces the Chief of Police shall resolve the dispute giving preference to the business owner directly adjacent to the parking space. The Chief of Police shall also apply the requirements of §307-5(E) of the City Code which prohibits vendors from selling a product within 100 feet of a store selling the same or a substantially similar product.

  8. The Chief of Police shall have the discretion to reserve spaces for parking, delivery, persons with disability and emergency vehicle access.

  9. The permittee shall delineate the parking area to be occupied with stanchions and ropes or other similar means of separating the area from traffic on Warren Street. Permittees planning on using the parking space after sunset shall place reflective traffic cones or an equivalent means of providing a visual warning to vehicle drivers at the corner of the parking area.

  10. Permittees must maintain a 4 foot-wide unobstructed area on the sidewalk for pedestrian passage.

  11. Use of the parking spaces by patrons is prohibited after 10:00 PM. Restaurants and bars shall stop serving patrons within the parking spaces by 10:00 PM and use best efforts to have the area vacated as soon as possible thereafter.

  12.  All applicants must provide a hold-harmless indemnity to the City and provide a certificate of insurance naming the City of Hudson as an additional insured on the applicant’s general liability policy in the amount of $1,000,000 per occurrence and $2,000,000 aggregate.  For all applicants wishing to serve alcohol in the designated parking area, the business shall also provide a certificate of insurance naming the City as an additional insured on their Liquor Legal Liability insurance.

  13. Permittees are responsible for securing all tables, chairs, umbrellas and any other equipment used in the parking lot or sidewalk areas.  Any umbrella or other means of providing shade shall be anchored in accordance with manufacturer’s specifications.

  14. Permittees are responsible for maintaining waste receptacles on their property and directing patrons to use these receptacles. 

  15. Permittees are permitted to use generators limited to inverter type with a maximum capacity of 3500W and must not exceed a noise level of 60dB.

  16. Amplified outdoor music is prohibited in the parking spaces or the exterior of the business.  Speakers may not be placed outside of the building or placed in windows directed outside of the building. 

  17. Permittees will be allowed to leave fixtures and materials in the permitted parking space when Warren Streets is open and not partially closed under condition 3 above. Patrons and customers are not permitted in the parking space when Warren Street is open except as provided in condition 11 above. 

  18. A permit fee for the Shared Summer Streets program is hereby waived through July 14, 2020 at which time a permit fee waiver will be reconsidered. 

  19. Enforcement

    A. The Hudson Police Department shall have the authority to enforce this Order by issuing a written warning to any person or entity in violation of this Order. Upon a second violation of this provision the Chief of Police shall revoke the parking space permit for a period of one week. The business owner may apply for reinstatement after the one-week revocation period.  If the business violates this Order again after reinstatement, the permit shall be revoked for the duration of the Shared Summer Streets program. Any permittee may appeal a revocation order by filing a written appeal with the Mayor’s office within 72 hours of the issuance of the revocation order.  Any appeal must include sworn statements supporting any claim that the permit should not be revoked.

    B. Notwithstanding paragraph (A), all relevant provisions of the Hudson City Code, including the Hudson Noise Control Code (Code Ch. 210) remain in effect.

    C. Furthermore, in addition, pursuant to N.Y. Exec. Law § 24, any person who knowingly violates any local emergency order of a chief executive promulgated pursuant to said section is guilty of a class B misdemeanor.  

  20. All permits for the Shared Streets Program previously issued pursuant to Emergency Orders are hereby continued subject to the permittee having currently valid certificates of insurance on file.




On July 1, 2020, Mayor Johnson issued an Emergency Order regarding Hudson's response to coronavirus.  

LOCAL STATE OF EMERGENCY ORDER NO. 26

Effective:  July 3, 2020 at 10:00 AM through July 8, 2020 at 11:59 PM.

Pursuant to my Proclamation declaring a Local State of Emergency in the City of Hudson, New York on June 22, 2020, I hereby issue Local Emergency Order No. 26. Emergency Order No. 26 will be effective in the City of Hudson, New York for a period of time beginning at 10:00 AM on July 3, 2020 and continuing in effect and ending at 11:59 PM on July 8, 2020.

A Local Emergency Order may be issued to protect life and property or to bring an emergency situation under control.  Because the uncontrolled spread of COVID-19 threatens or imperils public safety, as Chief Executive of this municipality, I have exercised the authority given to me under New York State Executive Law, Article 2-B, to preserve the public safety and to issue orders rendering and implementing all required and available assistance and polices vital to the security, well-being and health of the citizens of the community at my disposal. 

The COVID-19 pandemic has had a devastating impact upon the local economy, particularly the restaurant, bar and retail sectors.  As the state is moving to a controlled re-opening of the economy, those sectors are facing restrictions on their occupancy thus impacting their ability to continue in business. To mitigate the impact of those restrictions, other regulations are being relaxed by the State Liquor Authority that allow licensed establishments to expand their service area outdoors to previously unlicensed areas. 

Warren Street is a core area of Hudson’s restaurant and retail economy. By allowing businesses to occupy parking spaces through a shared streets program, the City can assist those businesses while protecting the interests of residences along Warren Street. The City will also benefit from the efforts of volunteers to implement the shared streets program thus avoiding the need for overtime by City employees and avoiding further strains on the City’s budget.

I previously issued Executive Order No. 23 establishing the Shared Summer Streets Program on a trial basis for the weekend of June 26, 2020.  Upon an evaluation of that weekend, including reviewing a survey of business owners, residents and visitors, I have determined that the City as a whole will benefit from a continuation of the program for so long as there are restrictions on the interior capacity of businesses due to the pandemic.  Based upon public input, I am amending the conditions for the Shared Summer Streets Program, and will likely amend conditions in the future based on acquired experience with the program. To that end, I will soon be naming an advisory committee made up of city stakeholders and public officials to solicit public input and advise me on future orders affecting the program.

Therefore, in order to mitigate the economic and social impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic and to compliment the efforts of the State Liquor Authority, I hereby order the establishment of the Shared Summer Streets Program which shall consist of the following:

  1. The purpose of this program is to reduce traffic on Warren Street by limiting it to two-way local traffic, reducing traffic speed and making parking spaces on Warren Street available for restaurant/bar seating or the display and sale of retail or craft merchandise.

  2. The Shared Summer Streets Program shall be on Warren Street from Front Street to 7th Street.

  3. Partial Street Closure.  

    1. On Mondays thru Fridays from 4:00 PM until 10:00 PM  and on Saturdays and Sundays from 11:00 AM until 10:00 PM for the duration of this Order, the Hudson Police Department and Department of Public Works shall coordinate in the posting of barricades and signs notifying vehicle drivers that Warren Street is open to local traffic only within one-block of the intersection and that the speed limit is 5 MPH.

    2. Local traffic is defined as traffic associated with people who reside or operate a business on Warren Street, individuals with disabilities who require accessible parking to shop on Warren Street, those who are picking up or dropping off food or other merchandise from a business operating on Warren Street or public transportation.

    3. Barricades shall be posted at each intersection crossing Warren Street from Front Street to 7th Street. 

  4.  The owner of each business on the first floor of a building on Warren Street may apply for a permit to occupy the parking space directly in front of said building. Applications may be made to the Hudson Police Department on a form to be prepared by the Police Department.

  5. Restaurants and bars may apply for permits to occupy parking spaces adjacent to the parking spaces directly in front of their establishments. 

  6. Non-appurtenant businesses and individuals may also apply for permits to occupy parking spaces. Permits may only be issued to Hudson businesses and individuals. No permits for food trucks, food carts or other vendors shall be issued for the Shared Summer Streets area of Warren Street except for any current permits or completed applications for a vendor permit pending on this date. 

  7. Where there is a conflict in the request for permits for parking spaces the Chief of Police shall resolve the dispute giving preference to the business owner directly adjacent to the parking space. The Chief of Police shall also apply the requirements of §307-5(E) of the City Code which prohibits vendors from selling a product within 100 feet of a store selling the same or a substantially similar product.

  8. The Chief of Police shall have the discretion to reserve spaces for parking, delivery, persons with disability and emergency vehicle access.

  9. The permittee shall delineate the parking area to be occupied with stanchions and ropes or other similar means of separating the area from traffic on Warren Street. Permittees planning on using the parking space after sunset shall place reflective traffic cones or an equivalent means of providing a visual warning to vehicle drivers at the corner of the parking area.

  10. Permittees must maintain a 4 foot-wide unobstructed area on the sidewalk for pedestrian passage.

  11. Use of the parking spaces by patrons is prohibited after 10:00 PM. Restaurants and bars shall stop serving patrons within the parking spaces by 10:00 PM and use best efforts to have the area vacated as soon as possible thereafter.

  12.  All applicants must provide a hold-harmless indemnity to the City and provide a certificate of insurance naming the City of Hudson as an additional insured on the applicant’s general liability policy in the amount of $1,000,000 per occurrence and $2,000,000 aggregate.  For all applicants wishing to serve alcohol in the designated parking area, the business shall also provide a certificate of insurance naming the City as an additional insured on their Liquor Legal Liability insurance.

  13. Permittees are responsible for securing all tables, chairs, umbrellas and any other equipment used in the parking lot or sidewalk areas.  Any umbrella or other means of providing shade shall be anchored in accordance with manufacturer’s specifications.

  14. Permittees are responsible for maintaining waste receptacles on their property and directing patrons to use these receptacles. 

  15. Permittees are permitted to use generators limited to inverter type with a maximum capacity of 3500W and must not exceed a noise level of 60dB.

  16. Amplified outdoor music is prohibited in the parking spaces.

  17. Permittees will be allowed to leave fixtures and materials in the permitted parking space when Warren Streets is open and not partially closed under condition 3 above. Patrons and customers are not permitted in the parking space when Warren Street is open except as provided in condition 11 above. .

  18. A permit fee for the Shared Summer Streets program is hereby waived through July 13, 2020. It is my intention to locate a source of funding to offset the lost parking revenues anticipated from this program. If my efforts are unsuccessful, a permit fee may be assessed in the future.  

  19. All permits for the Shared Streets Program previously issued pursuant to Emergency Order No. 23 are hereby continued subject to the permittee having currently valid certificates of insurance on file.

  20. To avoid further burdens on the City’s budget, department heads are directed to avoid authorizing overtime for the implementation of this Order unless exigent circumstances require overtime to maintain public health and safety.

  21. It is my expectation to continue to reissue this Order through October 2020, subject to continued restrictions on the business occupancy and the orders of the State Liquor Authority allowing the expansion of licensed establishments.   This Order and the Shared Summer Streets Program may be continued and/or amended by a future Emergency Order.

Learn more about Shared Summer Streets


 

 

On July 1, 2020, Mayor Johnson issued an Emergency Order regarding Hudson's response to coronavirus.  

LOCAL STATE OF EMERGENCY ORDER NO. 25

EFFECTIVE: July 1, 2020 at 6:00 PM through July 6, 2020 at 10:00 AM

Pursuant to my proclamation declaring a Local State of Emergency in the City of Hudson, New York on June 22, 2020, I hereby issue Local Emergency OrderNo. 25. Emergency Order No. 25 will be effective in the City of Hudson, New York for a period of time beginning at 6:00 pm on July 1, 2020 and continuing in effect and ending at 10:00 am on July 6, 2020, a period not to exceed five (5) days. Such order shall cease to be in effect as of July 6, 2020 at 10:00 am, or upon my declaration that the state of emergency no longer exists, whichever occurs sooner. This order also may be extended for additional periods not to exceed five days each, during the pendency of the local state of emergency. 

A Local State of Emergency Order may be issued to protect life and property or to bring an emergency situation under control.  Because the uncontrolled spread of COVID-19  threatens or imperils public safety, as Chief Executive of this municipality, I have exercised the authority given to me under New York State Executive Law, Article 2-B, to preserve the public safety and to issue orders rendering and implementing all required and available assistance and polices vital to the security, well-being and health of the citizens of the community at my disposal. Toward that end, I hereby order the following:

  1. Public Administrative Buildings.  The public use of administrative buildings including City Hall, Parks and Recreation, Public Works, the Water Department and the Public Safety Building will be limited as follows: 

    CITY HALL. The following offices are located in City Hall:  City Clerk, Common Council President, Corporation Counsel, Mayor, Parking Bureau, Public Works Department, Tax Assessor, Treasurer, and Water Department.  

    City Hall will be closed to the public except by appointment only for essential services. Pursuant to the Governor’s Executive Order No. 202.17,  all members of the public must wear masks if they enter City Hall as adequate social distancing is not possible due to the configuration of the space. Business in the departments located in City Hall that can be conducted online, such as paying parking tickets, property taxes, and water or other bills, should be done online at the City’s website, http://www.cityofhudson.org or over the phone.

    PUBLIC SAFETY BUILDING. The following offices are located in the Public Safety Building: Police, City Court, City Court Clerk.

    The Police Office is open to the public open to the public, but members of the public must press the doorbell for entrance and wear a mask while inside the building. 

    City Court and the City Court Clerk’s Office is open to the public by appointment only through the City Court Clerk.

    SENIOR CENTER.  The Senior Center located at 51 N. 5th Street is closed to the public. 

    YOUTH DEPARTMENT BUILDINGS. The Youth Department Buildings located at 18 S. 3rd Street and 132 N. 6th Street are closed to the public.  

  2. Senior Programs. All in person public programs at the Senior Center are canceled. Virtual programming is being offered, please check the City’s website for details. 

  3. Youth Programs. All public programs at the Youth Department buildings are canceled.

  4. Parks and Outdoor Recreation.  Parks may be used while keeping at least 6 feet distance between individuals who are not otherwise quarantined together, except that the following City park facilities will be closed to the public: playground areas, basketball courts, and bathrooms. Picnic table areas may be used while keeping at least 6 feet distance between individuals who are not otherwise quarantined together. The public use of the City’s Dog Park located on Front Street may continue  under the following conditions: 

    A) Park users shall keep at least 6 feet distance between themselves and other people who are not otherwise quarantined together. 
    B) Park users must wear a mask while using the park.

  1. Marriage Licenses. Pursuant to Governor’s Executive Order 202.24, Clerks are authorized but not required it issue marriage licenses virtually.  To reduce the possibility of contagion, the City Clerk’s Office will issue marriages licenses to Columbia County residents only. Licenses will be issued in person by appointment only, at the discretion of the Chief Clerk.  Residents of Columbia County wishing to obtain a marriage license should contact the Clerk’s office for information about securing a license. 

  1. Public Meetings.  All City meetings, including Common Council, Planning Board, Zoning Board, Hudson Preservation Commission, Tourism Board and Committee meetings of the Common Council and public hearings held by the Mayor, if any, will be held via electronic means.  Per the Governor’s Executive Order, No. 202.1, Article 7 of the Public Officers Law is suspended and the public will not be permitted to attend Common Council meetings or Committee meetings, or meetings of any other boards, committees or commissions.  Meetings that are held will be live streamed, (instructions will be on the website to access live streaming), and a transcript or minutes, as required, will be made available on the website, following the meeting. Council Members may attend via electronic means. 

  1. Parking & Parking Meters.  

    All parking meter regulations are in effect as of June 1, 2020.

    Alternate side street parking:

    Alternate Side Parking is required for night parking Monday through Friday as follows:

    Between 12:00 Midnight and 8:00 AM on all streets within the City unless otherwise posted:

    -Park on the odd side for odd numbered calendar dates.
    -Park on the even side for even numbered calendar dates. 

    Both side street night parking:

    Both side street night parking is permitted Saturday (beginning at 12:00 am Saturday) and Sunday (beginning at 12:00 am Sunday). 

    Due to the Hudson Farmer's Market, no parking in county or city lots on Columbia between 5th and 7th Street on Saturdays 8am - 2pm.

  2. Face Masks.  All City employees who are present in the workplace shall be provided and shall wear face coverings when in direct contact with customers or members of the public.




On June 26, 2020, Mayor Johnson issued an Emergency Order regarding Hudson's response to coronavirus.  

LOCAL STATE OF EMERGENCY ORDER NO. 24

EFFECTIVE: June 26, 2020 at 12:00 PM through July 1, 2020 at 6:00 PM.

Pursuant to my proclamation declaring a Local State of Emergency in the City of Hudson, New York on June 22, 2020, I hereby issue Local Emergency OrderNo. 23. Emergency Order No. 23 will be effective in the City of Hudson, New York for a period of time beginning at 12:00 pm on June 26, 2020 and continuing in effect and ending at 6:00 pm on July 1, 2020, a period not to exceed five (5) days. Such order shall cease to be in effect as of June 26, 2020 at 6:00 pm, or upon my declaration that the state of emergency no longer exists, whichever occurs sooner. This order also may be extended for additional periods not to exceed five days each, during the pendency of the local state of emergency.  

A Local State of Emergency Order may be issued to protect life and property or to bring an emergency situation under control.  Because the uncontrolled spread of COVID-19  threatens or imperils public safety, as Chief Executive of this municipality, I have exercised the authority given to me under New York State Executive Law, Article 2-B, to preserve the public safety and to issue orders rendering and implementing all required and available assistance and polices vital to the security, well-being and health of the citizens of the community at my disposal. Toward that end, I hereby order the following:

  1. Public Administrative Buildings.  The public use of administrative buildings including City Hall, Parks and Recreation, Public Works, the Water Department and the Public Safety Building will be limited as follows: 

    CITY HALL. The following offices are located in City Hall:  City Clerk, Common Council President, Corporation Counsel, Mayor, Parking Bureau, Public Works Department, Tax Assessor, Treasurer, and Water Department.  

    City Hall will be closed to the public except by appointment only for essential services. Pursuant to the Governor’s Executive Order No. 202.17,  all members of the public must wear masks if they enter City Hall as adequate social distancing is not possible due to the configuration of the space. Business in the departments located in City Hall that can be conducted online, such as paying parking tickets, property taxes, and water or other bills, should be done online at the City’s website, http://www.cityofhudson.org or over the phone. 

    PUBLIC SAFETY BUILDING. The following offices are located in the Public Safety Building: Police, City Court, City Court Clerk.

    The Police Office is open to the public open to the public, but members of the public must press the doorbell for entrance and wear a mask while inside the building. 

    City Court and the City Court Clerk’s Office is open to the public by appointment only through the City Court Clerk.

    SENIOR CENTER.  The Senior Center located at 51 N. 5th Street is closed to the public. 

    YOUTH DEPARTMENT BUILDINGS. The Youth Department Buildings located at 18 S. 3rd Street and 132 N. 6th Street are closed to the public.  

  2. Senior Programs. All public programs at the Senior Center are canceled.

  3. Youth Programs. All public programs at the Youth Department buildings are canceled.

  4. Parks and Outdoor Recreation.  Parks may be used while keeping at least 6 feet distance between individuals who are not otherwise quarantined together, except that the following City park facilities will be closed to the public: playground areas, basketball courts, and bathrooms. Picnic table areas may be used while keeping at least 6 feet distance between individuals who are not otherwise quarantined together. The public use of the City’s Dog Park located on Front Street may continue  under the following conditions: 

    A) No more than 10 people shall use the park at one time; and 

    B) Park users shall keep at least 6 feet distance between themselves and other people who are not otherwise quarantined together. 

    C) Park users must wear a mask while using the park.

  5. Marriage Licenses. Pursuant to Governor’s Executive Order 202.24, Clerks are authorized but not required it issue marriage licenses virtually.  To reduce the possibility of contagion, the City Clerk’s Office will issue marriages licenses to Columbia County residents only. Licenses will be issued in person by appointment only, at the discretion of the Chief Clerk.  Residents of Columbia County wishing to obtain a marriage license should contact the Clerk’s office for information about securing a license. 

  6. Public Meetings.  All City meetings, including Common Council, Planning Board, Zoning Board, Hudson Preservation Commission, Tourism Board and Committee meetings of the Common Council and public hearings held by the Mayor, if any, will be held via electronic means.  Per the Governor’s Executive Order, No. 202.1, Article 7 of the Public Officers Law is suspended and the public will not be permitted to attend Common Council meetings or Committee meetings, or meetings of any other boards, committees or commissions.  Meetings that are held will be live streamed, (instructions will be on the website to access live streaming), and a transcript or minutes, as required, will be made available on the website, following the meeting. Council Members may attend via electronic means. 

  7. Parking & Parking Meters.  

    All parking meter regulations are in effect as of June 1, 2020.

    Alternate side street parking:

    Alternate Side Parking is required for night parking Monday through Friday as follows:

    Between 12:00 Midnight and 8:00 AM on all streets within the City unless otherwise posted:

    A) Park on the odd side for odd numbered calendar dates.
    B) Park on the even side for even numbered calendar dates. 

    Both side street night parking:

    Both side street night parking is permitted Saturday (beginning at 12:00 am Saturday) and Sunday (beginning at 12:00 am Sunday). 

    Due to the Hudson Farmer's Market, no parking in county or city lots on Columbia between 5th and 7th Street on Saturdays 8am - 2pm.

  8. Face Masks.  All City employees who are present in the workplace shall be provided and shall wear face coverings when in direct contact with customers or members of the public.


On June 22, 2020, Mayor Johnson issued an Emergency Order regarding Hudson's response to coronavirus.  

LOCAL STATE OF EMERGENCY ORDER NO. 23

EFFECTIVE: June 26, 2020 at 10:00 AM through June 28, 2020 at 11:59 PM.

Pursuant to my Proclamation declaring a Local State of Emergency in the City of Hudson, New York on June 22, 2020, I hereby issue Local Emergency Order No. 23. Emergency Order No. 23 will be effective in the City of Hudson, New York for a period of time beginning at 10:00 AM on June 26, 2020 and continuing in effect and ending at 11:59 PM on June 28, 2020.

A Local Emergency Order may be issued to protect life and property or to bring an emergency situation under control.  Because the uncontrolled spread of COVID-19 threatens or imperils public safety, as Chief Executive of this municipality, I have exercised the authority given to me under New York State Executive Law, Article 2-B, to preserve the public safety and to issue orders rendering and implementing all required and available assistance and polices vital to the security, well-being and health of the citizens of the community at my disposal. 

The COVID-19 pandemic has had a devastating impact upon the local economy, particularly the restaurant, bar and retail sectors.  As the state is moving to a controlled re-opening of the economy, those sectors are facing restrictions on their occupancy thus impacting their ability to continue in business. To mitigate the impact of those restrictions, other regulations are being relaxed by the State Liquor Authority that allow licensed establishments to expand their service area outdoors to previously unlicensed areas. 

Warren Street is a core area of Hudson’s restaurant and retail economy. By allowing businesses to occupy parking spaces through a shared streets program, the City can assist those businesses while protecting the interests of residences along Warren Street. The City will also benefit from the efforts of volunteers to implement the shared streets program thus avoiding the need for overtime by City employees and avoiding further strains on the City’s budget.

Therefore, in order to mitigate the economic and social impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic and to compliment the efforts of the State Liquor Authority, I hereby order the establishment of the Shared Summer Streets Program which shall consist of the following:

  1. The purpose of this program is to reduce traffic on Warren Street by limiting it to two-way local traffic, reducing traffic speed and making parking spaces on Warren Street available for restaurant/bar seating or the display and sale of retail or craft merchandise.

  2. The Shared Summer Streets Program shall be on Warren Street from Front Street to 7th Street.

  3. Partial Street Closure.  

    1. From 10:00 AM until 8:30 PM on each day of this Order (June 26, 27 and 28), the Hudson Police Department and Department of Public Works shall coordinate in the posting of barricades and signs notifying vehicle drivers that Warren Street is open to local traffic only within one-block of the intersection and that the speed limit is 5 MPH.

    2. Local traffic is defined as traffic associated with people who reside or operate a business on Warren Street, individuals with disabilities who require accessible parking to shop on Warren Street, those who are picking up or dropping off food or other merchandise from a business operating on Warren Street or public transportation.

    3. Barricades shall be posted at each intersection crossing Warren Street from Front Street to 7th Street. 

  4.  The owner of each business on the first floor of a building on Warren Street may apply for a permit to occupy the parking space directly in front of said building. Applications may be made to the Hudson Police Department on a form to be prepared by the Police Department.

  5. Restaurants and bars may apply for permits to occupy parking spaces adjacent to the parking spaces directly in front of their establishments. 

  6. Non-appurtenant businesses and individuals may also apply for permits to occupy parking spaces.

  7. Where there is a conflict in the request for permits for parking spaces the Chief of Police shall resolve the dispute giving preference to the business owner directly adjacent to the parking space.

  8. The Chief of Police shall have the discretion to reserve spaces for parking, delivery, persons with disability and emergency vehicle access.

  9. The permittee shall delineate the parking area to be occupied with stanchions and ropes or other similar means of separating the area from traffic on Warren Street.

  10. Permittees must maintain a 4 foot-wide unobstructed area on the sidewalk for pedestrian passage.

  11. Use of the parking spaces by patrons is prohibited after 8:30 PM. Restaurants and bars shall stop serving patrons within the parking spaces by 8:30 PM and use best efforts to have the area vacated as soon as possible thereafter.

  12.  All applicants must provide a hold-harmless indemnity to the City and provide a certificate of insurance naming the City of Hudson as an additional insured on the applicant’s general liability policy in the amount of $1,000,000 per occurrence and $2,000,000 aggregate.  For all applicants wishing to serve alcohol in the designated parking area, the business shall also provide a certificate of insurance naming the City as an additional insured on their Liquor Legal Liability insurance.

  13. Permittees are responsible for securing all tables, chairs, umbrellas and any other equipment used in the parking lot or sidewalk areas.  Any umbrella or other means of providing shade shall be anchored in accordance with manufacturer’s specifications.

  14. Permittees are responsible for maintaining waste receptacles on their property and directing patrons to use these receptacles. 

  15. Permittees are permitted to use generators limited to inverter type with a maximum capacity of 3500W and must not exceed a noise level of 60dB.

  16. Amplified outdoor music is prohibited in the parking spaces.

  17. All materials in the permitted parking space must be removed by 11:59 PM on June 28, 2020.

  18. For this trial weekend of the Shared Summer Streets program a permit fee is being waived. If the program is continued, a weekly fee of $24 per parking space or portion thereof, will be assessed. 

  19. To avoid further burdens on the City’s budget, department heads are directed to avoid authorizing overtime for the implementation of this Order unless exigent circumstances require overtime to maintain public health and safety.

  20. This Order covers only the weekend of June 26 through June 28 at 11:59 PM and is intended to be a trial period to determine the efficacy of the program.  This Order and the Shared Summer Streets Program may be continued and/or amended by a future Emergency Order.

Learn more about Shared Summer Streets

On June 22, 2020, Mayor Johnson issued an Emergency Order regarding Hudson's response to coronavirus.  

LOCAL STATE OF EMERGENCY ORDER NO. 22

EFFECTIVE: June 22, 2020 at 12:00 PM  through June 26, 2020 at 8:00 am

Pursuant to my proclamation declaring a Local State of Emergency in the City of Hudson, New York on June 22, 2020, I hereby issue Local Emergency OrderNo. 22. Emergency Order No. 22 will be effective in the City of Hudson, New York for a period of time beginning at 12:00 pm on June 22, 2020 and continuing in effect and ending at 6:00 pm on June 26, 2020, a period not to exceed five (5) days. Such order shall cease to be in effect as of June 26, 2020 at 6:00 pm, or upon my declaration that the state of emergency no longer exists, whichever occurs sooner. This order also may be extended for additional periods not to exceed five days each, during the pendency of the local state of emergency. 

A Local State of Emergency Order may be issued to protect life and property or to bring an emergency situation under control.  Because the uncontrolled spread of COVID-19  threatens or imperils public safety, as Chief Executive of this municipality, I have exercised the authority given to me under New York State Executive Law, Article 2-B, to preserve the public safety and to issue orders rendering and implementing all required and available assistance and polices vital to the security, well-being and health of the citizens of the community at my disposal. Toward that end, I hereby order the following:

  1. Public Administrative Buildings.  The public use of administrative buildings including City Hall, Parks and Recreation, Public Works, the Water Department and the Public Safety Building will be limited as follows: 

    CITY HALL. The following offices are located in City Hall:  City Clerk, Common Council President, Corporation Counsel, Mayor, Parking Bureau, Public Works Department, Tax Assessor, Treasurer, and Water Department.  

    City Hall will be closed to the public except by appointment only for essential services. Pursuant to the Governor’s Executive Order No. 202.17,  all members of the public must wear masks if they enter City Hall as adequate social distancing is not possible due to the configuration of the space. Business in the departments located in City Hall that can be conducted online, such as paying parking tickets, property taxes, and water or other bills, should be done online at the City’s website, http://www.cityofhudson.org or over the phone. 

    PUBLIC SAFETY BUILDING. The following offices are located in the Public Safety Building: Police, City Court, City Court Clerk.

    The Police Office is open to the public open to the public, but members of the public must press the doorbell for entrance and wear a mask while inside the building. 

    City Court and the City Court Clerk’s Office is open to the public by appointment only through the City Court Clerk.

    SENIOR CENTER.  The Senior Center located at 51 N. 5th Street is closed to the public. 

    YOUTH DEPARTMENT BUILDINGS. The Youth Department Buildings located at 18 S. 3rd Street and 132 N. 6th Street are closed to the public.  

  2. Senior Programs. All public programs at the Senior Center are canceled.

  3. Youth Programs. All public programs at the Youth Department buildings are canceled.

  4. Parks and Outdoor Recreation.  Parks may be used while keeping at least 6 feet distance between individuals who are not otherwise quarantined together, except that the following City park facilities will be closed to the public: playground areas, basketball courts, and bathrooms. Picnic table areas may be used while keeping at least 6 feet distance between individuals who are not otherwise quarantined together. The public use of the City’s Dog Park located on Front Street may continue  under the following conditions: 

    A) No more than 10 people shall use the park at one time; and 
    B) Park users shall keep at least 6 feet distance between themselves and other people who are not otherwise quarantined together. 
    C) Park users must wear a mask while using the park.

  5. Marriage Licenses. Pursuant to Governor’s Executive Order 202.24, Clerks are authorized but not required it issue marriage licenses virtually.  To reduce the possibility of contagion, the City Clerk’s Office will issue marriages licenses to Columbia County residents only. Licenses will be issued in person by appointment only, at the discretion of the Chief Clerk.  Residents of Columbia County wishing to obtain a marriage license should contact the Clerk’s office for information about securing a license. 

  6. Public Meetings.  All City meetings, including Common Council, Planning Board, Zoning Board, Hudson Preservation Commission, Tourism Board and Committee meetings of the Common Council and public hearings held by the Mayor, if any, will be held via electronic means.  Per the Governor’s Executive Order, No. 202.1, Article 7 of the Public Officers Law is suspended and the public will not be permitted to attend Common Council meetings or Committee meetings, or meetings of any other boards, committees or commissions.  Meetings that are held will be live streamed, (instructions will be on the website to access live streaming), and a transcript or minutes, as required, will be made available on the website, following the meeting. Council Members may attend via electronic means. 

  7. Parking & Parking Meters.  

    All parking meter regulations are in effect as of June 1, 2020.

    Alternate side street parking:

    Alternate Side Parking is required for night parking Monday through Friday as follows:

    Between 12:00 Midnight and 8:00 AM on all streets within the City unless otherwise posted:

    -Park on the odd side for odd numbered calendar dates.
    -Park on the even side for even numbered calendar dates. 

    Both side street night parking:

    Both side street night parking is permitted Saturday (beginning at 12:00 am Saturday) and Sunday (beginning at 12:00 am Sunday). 

    Due to the Hudson Farmer's Market, no parking in county or city lots on Columbia between 5th and 7th Street on Saturdays 8am - 2pm.

  8. Face Masks.  All City employees who are present in the workplace shall be provided and shall wear face coverings when in direct contact with customers or members of the public.


On June 22, 2020, Mayor Johnson issued an Emergency Order regarding Hudson's response to coronavirus

LOCAL STATE OF EMERGENCY PROCLAMATION AND EMERGENCY ORDER

Local State of Emergency Proclamation

Pursuant to New York State Executive Law, Article 2-B, Section 24, I hereby declare and proclaim a continuing Local State of Emergency in the City of Hudson, New York beginning June 22, 2020. This Proclamation shall remain in effect for a period not to exceed thirty days or until I rescind such Proclamation, whichever occurs first.

This State of Emergency is based upon the emergency conditions set forth in the Governor’s March 7, 2020, Executive Order Number 202, declaring a State disaster emergency for the entire State of New York related to the uncontrolled contagion of the novel coronavirus known as COVID-19 and further, that these conditions persist and both travel-related cases and community contact transmission of COVID-19 have been documented in New York State and are expected to continue.


On June 17, 2020, Mayor Johnson issued an Emergency Order regarding Hudson's response to coronavirus.  

LOCAL STATE OF EMERGENCY ORDER NO. 21

EFFECTIVE: June 17, 2020 at 12:00 PM  through June 22, 2020 at 8:00 am

Pursuant to my proclamation declaring a Local State of Emergency in the City of Hudson, New York on May 22, 2020, I hereby issue Local Emergency Order No. 21. Emergency Order No. 21 will be effective in the City of Hudson, New York for a period of time beginning at 12:00 pm on June 17, 2020 and continuing in effect and ending at 12:00 pm on June 22, 2020, a period not to exceed five (5) days. Such order shall cease to be in effect as of June 22, 2020 at 12:00 pm, or upon my declaration that the state of emergency no longer exists, whichever occurs sooner. This order also may be extended for additional periods not to exceed five days each, during the pendency of the local state of emergency. 

A Local State of Emergency Order may be issued to protect life and property or to bring an emergency situation under control.  Because the uncontrolled spread of COVID-19  threatens or imperils public safety, as Chief Executive of this municipality, I have exercised the authority given to me under New York State Executive Law, Article 2-B, to preserve the public safety and to issue orders rendering and implementing all required and available assistance and polices vital to the security, well-being and health of the citizens of the community at my disposal. Toward that end, I hereby order the following:

  1. Public Administrative Buildings.  The public use of administrative buildings including City Hall, Parks and Recreation, Public Works, the Water Department and the Public Safety Building will be limited as follows: 

    CITY HALL. The following offices are located in City Hall:  City Clerk, Common Council President, Corporation Counsel, Mayor, Parking Bureau, Public Works Department, Tax Assessor, Treasurer, and Water Department.  

    City Hall will be closed to the public except by appointment only for essential services. Pursuant to the Governor’s Executive Order No. 202.17,  all members of the public must wear masks if they enter City Hall as adequate social distancing is not possible due to the configuration of the space. Business in the departments located in City Hall that can be conducted online, such as paying parking tickets, property taxes, and water or other bills, should be done online at the City’s website, http://www.cityofhudson.org or over the phone. 

    PUBLIC SAFETY BUILDING. The following offices are located in the Public Safety Building: Police, City Court, City Court Clerk.

    The Police Office is open to the public open to the public, but members of the public must press the doorbell for entrance and wear a mask while inside the building. 

    City Court and the City Court Clerk’s Office is open to the public by appointment only through the City Court Clerk.

    SENIOR CENTER.  The Senior Center located at 51 N. 5th Street is closed to the public. 

    YOUTH DEPARTMENT BUILDINGS. The Youth Department Buildings located at 18 S. 3rd Street and 132 N. 6th Street are closed to the public.  

  2. Senior Programs. All public programs at the Senior Center are canceled.

  3. Youth Programs. All public programs at the Youth Department buildings are canceled.

  4. Parks and Outdoor Recreation.  Parks may be used while keeping at least 6 feet distance between individuals who are not otherwise quarantined together, except that the following City park facilities will be closed to the public: playground areas, basketball courts, and bathrooms. Picnic table areas may be used while keeping at least 6 feet distance between individuals who are not otherwise quarantined together. The public use of the City’s Dog Park located on Front Street may continue  under the following conditions: 

    A) No more than 10 people shall use the park at one time; and 
    B) Park users shall keep at least 6 feet distance between themselves and other people who are not otherwise quarantined together. 
    C) Park users must wear a mask while using the park.

  5. Marriage Licenses. Pursuant to Governor’s Executive Order 202.24, Clerks are authorized but not required it issue marriage licenses virtually.  To reduce the possibility of contagion, the City Clerk’s Office will issue marriages licenses to Columbia County residents only. Licenses will be issued in person by appointment only, at the discretion of the Chief Clerk.  Residents of Columbia County wishing to obtain a marriage license should contact the Clerk’s office for information about securing a license. 

  6. Public Meetings.  All City meetings, including Common Council, Planning Board, Zoning Board, Hudson Preservation Commission, Tourism Board and Committee meetings of the Common Council and public hearings held by the Mayor, if any, will be held via electronic means.  Per the Governor’s Executive Order, No. 202.1, Article 7 of the Public Officers Law is suspended and the public will not be permitted to attend Common Council meetings or Committee meetings, or meetings of any other boards, committees or commissions.  Meetings that are held will be live streamed, (instructions will be on the website to access live streaming), and a transcript or minutes, as required, will be made available on the website, following the meeting. Council Members may attend via electronic means. 

  7. Parking & Parking Meters.  

    All parking meter regulations are in effect as of June 1, 2020.

    Alternate side street parking:

    Alternate Side Parking is required for night parking Monday through Friday as follows:

    Between 12:00 Midnight and 8:00 AM on all streets within the City unless otherwise posted:

    -Park on the odd side for odd numbered calendar dates. 
    -Park on the even side for even numbered calendar dates. 

    Both side street night parking:

    Both side street night parking is permitted Saturday (beginning at 12:00 am Saturday) and Sunday (beginning at 12:00 am Sunday). 

    Due to the Hudson Farmer's Market, no parking in county or city lots on Columbia between 5th and 7th Street on Saturdays 8am - 2pm.

  8. Face Masks.  All City employees who are present in the workplace shall be provided and shall wear face coverings when in direct contact with customers or members of the public.


On June 5, 2020, Mayor Johnson issued an Emergency Order regarding Hudson's response to coronavirus.  

LOCAL STATE OF EMERGENCY ORDER NO. 20

EFFECTIVE: June 5, 2020 at 12:00 PM  through June 8, 2020 at 8:00 am

Pursuant to my proclamation declaring a Local State of Emergency in the City of Hudson, New York on May 22, 2020, I hereby issue Local Emergency Order No. 20. Emergency Order No. 20 will be effective in the City of Hudson, New York for a period of time beginning at 12:00 pm on June 5, 2020 and continuing in effect and ending at 8:00 am on June 8, 2020, a period not to exceed five (5) days. Such order shall cease to be in effect as of June 8, 2020 at 8:00 am, or upon my declaration that the state of emergency no longer exists, whichever occurs sooner. This order also may be extended for additional periods not to exceed five days each, during the pendency of the local state of emergency.

A Local State of Emergency Order may be issued to protect life and property or to bring an emergency situation under control.  Because the uncontrolled spread of COVID-19  threatens or imperils public safety, as Chief Executive of this municipality, I have exercised the authority given to me under New York State Executive Law, Article 2-B, to preserve the public safety and to issue orders rendering and implementing all required and available assistance and polices vital to the security, well-being and health of the citizens of the community at my disposal. Toward that end, I hereby order the following:

  1. Public Administrative Buildings. The public use of administrative buildings including City Hall, Parks and Recreation, Public Works, the Water Department and the Public Safety Building will be limited as follows: 

    CITY HALL. The following offices are located in City Hall: City Clerk, Corporation Counsel, Mayor, Public Works, Treasurer, and Water Department.  

    City Hall will be closed to the public except by appointment only for essential services. Pursuant to the Governor’s Executive Order No. 202.17,  all members of the public must wear masks if they enter City Hall as adequate social distancing is not possible due to the configuration of the space. Business in the departments located in City Hall that can be conducted online, such as paying parking tickets, property taxes, and water or other bills, should be done online at the City’s website, http://www.cityofhudson.org or over the phone. 

    PUBLIC SAFETY BUILDING. The following offices are located in the Public Safety Building: Police, City Court, City Court Clerk.

    The Police Office is open to the public open to the public, but members of the public must press doorbell for entrance and wear a mask while inside the building. 

    City Court and the City Court Clerk’s Office is open to the public by appointment only through the City Court Clerk.

    SENIOR CENTER at the Hudson Library.  The Senior Center located at 51 N. 5th Street is closed to the public. 

    YOUTH DEPARTMENT BUILDINGS. The Youth Department Buildings located at 18 S. 3rd Street and 132 N. 6th Street are closed to the public.  

  2. Senior Programs. All public programs at the Senior Center are canceled.

  3. Youth Programs. All public programs at the Youth Department buildings are canceled.

  4. Parks and Outdoor Recreation.  Parks may be used while keeping at least 6 feet distance between individuals who are not otherwise quarantined together, except that the following City park facilities will be closed to the public: playground areas, basketball courts, and bathrooms. Picnic table areas may be used while keeping at least 6 feet distance between individuals who are not otherwise quarantined together. The public use of the City’s Dog Park located on Front Street may continue  under the following conditions: 
    A) No more than 6 people shall use the park at one time; and 
    B) Park users shall keep at least 6 feet distance between themselves and other people who are not otherwise quarantined together. 

  5. Marriage Licenses. Pursuant to Governor’s Executive Order 202.24, Clerks are authorized but not required it issue marriage licenses virtually.  To reduce the possibility of contagion, the City Clerk’s Office will no longer issue marriage licenses in person, (except by appointment only, at the discretion of the Chief Clerk), or to any person not residing in Hudson.  Residents of Hudson wishing to obtain a marriage license virtually or to determine if they may obtain a license in person, should contact the Clerk’s office for information about securing a license. 

  6. Public Meetings. All City meetings, including Common Council, Planning Board, Zoning Board, Hudson Preservation Commission, Tourism Board and Committee meetings of the Common Council and public hearings held by the Mayor, if any, will be held via electronic means.  Per the Governor’s Executive Order, No. 202.1, Article 7 of the Public Officers Law is suspended and the public will not be permitted to attend Common Council meetings or Committee meetings, or meetings of any other boards, committees or commissions.  Meetings that are held will be live streamed, (instructions will be on the website to access live streaming), and a transcript or minutes, as required, will be made available on the website, following the meeting. Council Members may attend via electronic means. 

  7. Parking Meters.  All parking meter regulations are in effect as of June 1, 2020.

  8. Alternate Side of the Street Parking. Alternate side street parking regulations are in effect as of June 1, 2020. (Alternate side street parking required Sunday through Thursday.  Both side street parking permitted Friday and Saturday.) 

  9. Face Masks. All City employees who are present in the workplace shall be provided and shall wear face coverings when in direct contact with customers or members of the public.


On May 27, 2020, Mayor Johnson issued an Emergency Order regarding Hudson's response to coronavirus.  

LOCAL STATE OF EMERGENCY ORDER NO. 19

EFFECTIVE: May 27, 2020 at 5:01 PM  through May 31, 2020 at 5:00 PM

Pursuant to my proclamation declaring a Local State of Emergency in the City of Hudson, New York on April 22, 2020, I hereby issue Local Emergency Order No. 19. Emergency Order No. 19 will be effective in the City of Hudson, New York for a period of time beginning at 5:01 pm on May 27, 2020 and continuing in effect and ending at 5:00 pm on May 31, 2020, a period not to exceed five (5) days. Such order shall cease to be in effect as of May 31, 2020 at 5:00 pm, or upon my declaration that the state of emergency no longer exists, whichever occurs sooner. This order also may be extended for additional periods not to exceed five days each, during the pendency of the local state of emergency.

A Local State of Emergency Order may be issued to protect life and property or to bring an emergency situation under control.  Because the uncontrolled spread of COVID-19  threatens or imperils public safety, as Chief Executive of this municipality, I have exercised the authority given to me under New York State Executive Law, Article 2-B, to preserve the public safety and to issue orders rendering and implementing all required and available assistance and polices vital to the security, well-being and health of the citizens of the community at my disposal. Toward that end, I hereby order the following:

  1. The public use of administrative buildings including City Hall, Parks and Recreation, Public Works, the Water Department and the Public Safety Building will be limited.  In order to keep the City running smoothly and staff safe, the City’s administration offices will be significantly reduced. City Hall will be closed to the public except by appointment only for essential services. Pursuant to the Governor’s Executive Order No. 202.17,  all members of the public must wear masks if they enter City Hall as adequate social distancing is not possible in the Clerk’s office due to the configuration of the space. Business in the departments that can be conducted online, such as paying parking tickets, property taxes, and water or other bills, should be done online at the City’s website, http://www.cityofhudson.org or over the phone. All public programs at the Youth Center and Senior Center are canceled. All City employee travel will be restricted, all conferences and workshops will be cancelled. 

  2.  Pursuant to Governor’s Executive Order 202.24, Clerks are authorized but not required it issue marriage licenses virtually.  To reduce the possibility of contagion, the City Clerk’s Office will no longer issue marriages licenses in person, (accept by appointment only, at the discretion of the Chief Clerk), or to any person not residing in Hudson.  Residents of Hudson wishing to obtain a marriage license virtually or to determine if they may obtain a license in person, should contact the Clerk’s office for information about securing a license. 

  3. Beginning May 1, 2020, all City meetings, including Common Council, Planning Board, Zoning Board, Hudson Preservation Commission, Tourism Board and Committee meetings of the Common Council and public hearings held by the Mayor, if any, will held via electronic means.  Per the Governor’s Executive Order, No. 202.1, Article 7 of the Public Officers Law is suspended and the public will not be permitted to attend Common Council meetings or Committee meetings.  Meetings that are held will be live streamed, (instructions will be on the website to access live streaming), and a transcript or minutes, as required, will be made available  on the website, following the meeting. Council Members may attend via electronic means. 

  4. Park Space: Pathways, walkways and trails may be used in public parks while keeping at least 6 feet distance between individuals who are not otherwise quarantined together but otherwise, city parks will be closed to the public, including playground areas, basketball courts, and picnic table and BBQ pit areas. The public use of the City’s Dog Park located on Front Street may continue  under the following conditions: 
    A) No more than 6 people shall use the park at one time; and 
    B) Park users shall keep at least 6 feet distance between themselves and other people who are not otherwise quarantined together. 

  5. Alternative side of the street parking regulation authorized by section 305-8 of the Hudson City Code and Hudson Police Commissioner Memorandum dated January 5, 1972 is suspended. 

  6. The payment of parking meter fees as required by section 305-20(A) is suspended.  

  7. Payment of late fees for parking tickets issued between February 1, 2020 and April 30, 2020 will be waived but late fees will begin to accrue as of June 15, 2020 if a ticket issued between February 1, 2020 and April 30, 2020 is not paid by June 1, 2020.

  8. All City employees who are present in the workplace shall be provided and shall wear face coverings when in direct contact with customers or members of the public.


 

On May 22, 2020, Mayor Johnson issued an Emergency Order regarding Hudson's response to coronavirus.  

LOCAL STATE OF EMERGENCY STATE OF EMERGENCY PROCLAMATION

Pursuant to New York State Executive Law, Article 2-B, Section 24, I hereby declare and proclaim a continuing Local State of Emergency in the City of Hudson, New York beginning May 22, 2020. This Proclamation shall remain in effect for a period not to exceed thirty days or until I rescind such Proclamation, whichever occurs first.

This State of Emergency has been declared due to emergency conditions produced by:

The uncontrolled contagion of the novel coronavirus known as COVID-19, and the need to limit the spread of the disease to the people of Hudson, particularly vulnerable populations such as the elderly, those with compromised immune systems, and those with other underlying health issues that predispose them to respiratory infections.  Due to both nation-wide and local limitations on medical supplies and the limited availability of life saving medical equipment such as respirators that could help save the lives of those in vulnerable populations, it is important to slow the contagion rate to the greatest extent possible. Slowing this rate will better enable health care providers and first responders to manage the health care needs of the population caused by this pandemic, as defined by the World Health Organization; prevent mass public contagion;  and ensure that City staff remain healthy and able to safely manage the business of the City, particularly staff who provide essential services to the residents of Hudson.


On May 22, 2020, Mayor Johnson issued an Emergency Order regarding Hudson's response to coronavirus.  

LOCAL STATE OF EMERGENCY ORDER NO. 18

EFFECTIVE: May 22, 2020 AT 5:01 PM THROUGH May 27, 2020 AT 5:00 PM

Pursuant to my proclamation declaring a Local State of Emergency in the City of Hudson, New York on April 22, 2020, I hereby issue Local Emergency OrderNo. 18. Emergency Order No. 18 will be effective in the City of Hudson, New York for a period of time beginning at 5:01 pm on May 22, 2020 and continuing in effect and ending at 5:00 pm on May 27, 2020, a period not to exceed five (5) days. Such order shall cease to be in effect as of May 27, 2020 at 5:00 pm, or upon my declaration that the state of emergency no longer exists, whichever occurs sooner. This order also may be extended for additional periods not to exceed five days each, during the pendency of the local state of emergency.  

A Local State of Emergency Order may be issued to protect life and property or to bring an emergency situation under control.  Because the uncontrolled spread of COVID-19  threatens or imperils public safety, as Chief Executive of this municipality, I have exercised the authority given to me under New York State Executive Law, Article 2-B, to preserve the public safety and to issue orders rendering and implementing all required and available assistance and polices vital to the security, well-being and health of the citizens of the community at my disposal. Toward that end, I hereby order the following:

  1. The public use of administrative buildings including City Hall, Parks and Recreation, Public Works, the Water Department and the Public Safety Building will be limited.  In order to keep the City running smoothly and staff safe, the City’s administration offices will be significantly reduced. City Hall will be closed to the public except by appointment only for essential services. Pursuant to the Governor’s Executive Order No. 202.17,  all members of the public must wear masks if they enter City Hall as adequate social distancing is not possible in the Clerk’s office due to the configuration of the space. Business in the departments that can be conducted online, such as paying parking tickets, property taxes, and water or other bills, should be done online at the City’s website, http://www.cityofhudson.org or over the phone. All public programs at the Youth Center and Senior Center are canceled. All City employee travel will be restricted, all conferences and workshops will be cancelled.

  2.  Pursuant to Governor’s Executive Order 202.24, Clerks are authorized but not required it issue marriage licenses virtually.  To reduce the possibility of contagion, the City Clerk’s Office will no longer issue marriages licenses in person, (accept by appointment only, at the discretion of the Chief Clerk), or to any person not residing in Hudson.  Residents of Hudson wishing to obtain a marriage license virtually or to determine if they may obtain a license in person, should contact the Clerk’s office for information about securing a license. 

  3. Beginning May 1, 2020, all City meetings, including Common Council, Planning Board, Zoning Board, Hudson Preservation Commission, Tourism Board and Committee meetings of the Common Council and public hearings held by the Mayor, if any, will held via electronic means.  Per the Governor’s Executive Order, No. 202.1, Article 7 of the Public Officers Law is suspended and the public will not be permitted to attend Common Council meetings or Committee meetings.  Meetings that are held will be live streamed, (instructions will be on the website to access live streaming), and a transcript or minutes, as required, will be made available on the website, following the meeting. Council Members may attend via electronic means. 

  4. Park Space: Pathways, walkways and trails may be used in public parks while keeping at least 6 feet distance between individuals who are not otherwise quarantined together but otherwise, city parks will be closed to the public, including playground areas, basketball courts, and picnic table and BBQ pit areas. The public use of the City’s Dog Park located on Front Street may continue  under the following conditions:
    A) No more than 6 people shall use the park at one time; and 
    B) Park users shall keep at least 6 feet distance between themselves and other people who are not otherwise quarantined together. 

  5. Alternative side of the street parking regulation authorized by section 305-8 of the Hudson City Code and Hudson Police Commissioner Memorandum dated January 5, 1972 is suspended. 

  6. The payment of parking meter fees as required by section 305-20(A) is suspended.  

  7. Payment of late fees for parking tickets issued between February 1, 2020 and April 30, 2020 will be waived but late fees will begin to accrue as of June 15, 2020 if a ticket issued between February 1, 2020 and April 30, 2020 is not paid by June 1, 2020.

  8. All City employees who are present in the workplace shall be provided and shall wear face coverings when in direct contact with customers or members of the public.





On May 17, 2020, Mayor Johnson issued an Emergency Order regarding Hudson's response to coronavirus.  

LOCAL STATE OF EMERGENCY ORDER NO. 17

EFFECTIVE: May 17, 2020 AT 12:01 PM THROUGH May 22, 2020 AT 12:00 PM

Pursuant to my proclamation declaring a Local State of Emergency in the City of Hudson, New York on April 22, 2020, I hereby issue Local Emergency Order No. 17. Emergency Order No. 17 will be effective in the City of Hudson, New York for a period of time beginning at 12:00 pm on May 17, 2020 and continuing in effect and ending at 12:00 pm on May 18, 2020, a period not to exceed five (5) days. Such order shall cease to be in effect as of May 22, 2020 at 12:00 pm, or upon my declaration that the state of emergency no longer exists, whichever occurs sooner. This order also may be extended for additional periods not to exceed five days each, during the pendency of the local state of emergency. 

A Local State of Emergency Order may be issued to protect life and property or to bring an emergency situation under control.  Because the uncontrolled spread of COVID-19  threatens or imperils public safety, as Chief Executive of this municipality, I have exercised the authority given to me under New York State Executive Law, Article 2-B, to preserve the public safety and to issue orders rendering and implementing all required and available assistance and polices vital to the security, well-being and health of the citizens of the community at my disposal. Toward that end, I hereby order the following:

  1. The public use of administrative buildings including City Hall, Parks and Recreation, Public Works, the Water Department and the Public Safety Building will be limited.  In order to keep the City running smoothly and staff safe, the City’s administration offices will be significantly reduced. City Hall will be closed to the public except by appointment only for essential services. Pursuant to the Governor’s Executive Order No. 202.17,  all members of the public must wear masks if they enter City Hall as adequate social distancing is not possible in the Clerk’s office due to the configuration of the space. Business in the departments that can be conducted online, such as paying parking tickets, property taxes, and water or other bills, should be done online at the City’s website, http://www.cityofhudson.org or over the phone. All public programs at the Youth Center and Senior Center are canceled. All City employee travel will be restricted, all conferences and workshops will be cancelled.

  2.  Pursuant to Governor’s Executive Order 202.24, Clerks are authorized but not required it issue marriage licenses virtually.  To reduce the possibility of contagion, the City Clerk’s Office will no longer issue marriages licenses in person, (accept by appointment only, at the discretion of the Chief Clerk), or to any person not residing in Hudson.  Residents of Hudson wishing to obtain a marriage license virtually or to determine if they may obtain a license in person, should contact the Clerk’s office for information about securing a license. 

  3. Beginning May 1, 2020, all City meetings, including Common Council, Planning Board, Zoning Board, Hudson Preservation Commission, Tourism Board and Committee meetings of the Common Council and public hearings held by the Mayor, if any, will held via electronic means.  Per the Governor’s Executive Order, No. 202.1, Article 7 of the Public Officers Law is suspended and the public will not be permitted to attend Common Council meetings or Committee meetings.  Meetings that are held will be live streamed, (instructions will be on the website to access live streaming), and a transcript or minutes, as required, will be made available on the website, following the meeting. Council Members may attend via electronic means. 

  4. Park Space: Pathways, walkways and trails may be used in public parks while keeping at least 6 feet distance between individuals who are not otherwise quarantined together but otherwise, city parks will be closed to the public, including playground areas, basketball courts, and picnic table and BBQ pit areas. The public use of the City’s Dog Park located on Front Street may continue  under the following conditions:
    A) No more than 6 people shall use the park at one time; and 
    B) Park users shall keep at least 6 feet distance between themselves and other people who are not otherwise quarantined together. 

  5. Alternative side of the street parking regulation authorized by section 305-8 of the Hudson City Code and Hudson Police Commissioner Memorandum dated January 5, 1972 is suspended. 

  6. The payment of parking meter fees as required by section 305-20(A) is suspended.  

  7. Payment of late fees for parking tickets issued between February 1, 2020 and April 30, 2020 will be waived but late fees will begin to accrue as of June 15, 2020 if a ticket issued between February 1, 2020 and April 30, 2020 is not paid by June 1, 2020.

  8. All City employees who are present in the workplace shall be provided and shall wear face coverings when in direct contact with customers or members of the public.

In addition to the Orders set forth above, the Governor of the State of New York has issued several Executive Orders as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic which can be viewed here.  https://www.governor.ny.gov/executiveorders  Of particular concern to the people of Hudson please note: 

  1. Per the Governor’s Executive Order 202.10, non-essential gatherings of individuals of any size for any reason (e.g. parties, celebrations or other social events) are canceled or postponed at this time.  This requirement also applies to houses of worship.  

  2. Per the Governor’s Executive Order 202.3, any restaurant or bar in the state of New York shall cease serving patrons food or beverage on-premises effective at 8 pm on March 16, 2020, and until further notice shall only serve food or beverage for off-premises consumption.

  3. Per the Governor’s Executive Order 202.16, for all essential businesses or entities, any employees who are present in the workplace shall be provided and shall wear face coverings when in direct contact with customers or members of the public. Businesses must provide, at their expense, such face coverings for their employees. This provision may be enforced by local governments or local law enforcement as if it were an order pursuant to section 12 or 12-b of the Public Health Law.  This requirement shall be effective Wednesday, April 15 at 8 p.m. 




On May 13, 2020, Mayor Johnson issued an Emergency Order regarding Hudson's response to coronavirus.  

LOCAL STATE OF EMERGENCY ORDER NO. 16

EFFECTIVE: May 13, 2020 AT 12:01 PM THROUGH May 18, 2020 AT 12:00 PM

Pursuant to my proclamation declaring a Local State of Emergency in the City of Hudson, New York on April 22, 2020, I hereby issue Local Emergency OrderNo. 16. Emergency Order No. 16 will be effective in the City of Hudson, New York for a period of time beginning at 12:00 pm on May 13, 2020 and continuing in effect and ending at 12:00 pm on May 18, 2020, a period not to exceed five (5) days. Such order shall cease to be in effect as of May 18, 2020 at 12:00 pm, or upon my declaration that the state of emergency no longer exists, whichever occurs sooner. This order also may be extended for additional periods not to exceed five days each, during the pendency of the local state of emergency. 

A Local State of Emergency Order may be issued to protect life and property or to bring an emergency situation under control.  Because the uncontrolled spread of COVID-19  threatens or imperils public safety, as Chief Executive of this municipality, I have exercised the authority given to me under New York State Executive Law, Article 2-B, to preserve the public safety and to issue orders rendering and implementing all required and available assistance and polices vital to the security, well-being and health of the citizens of the community at my disposal. Toward that end, I hereby order the following:

  1. The public use of administrative buildings including City Hall, Parks and Recreation, Public Works, the Water Department and the Public Safety Building will be limited.  In order to keep the City running smoothly and staff safe, the City’s administration offices will be significantly reduced. City Hall will be closed to the public except by appointment only for essential services. Pursuant to the Governor’s Executive Order No. 202.17,  all members of the public must wear masks if they enter City Hall as adequate social distancing is not possible in the Clerk’s office due to the configuration of the space. Business in the departments that can be conducted online, such as paying parking tickets, property taxes, and water or other bills, should be done online at the City’s website, http://www.cityofhudson.org or over the phone. All public programs at the Youth Center and Senior Center are canceled. All City employee travel will be restricted, all conferences and workshops will be cancelled.

  2.  Pursuant to Governor’s Executive Order 202.24, Clerks are authorized but not required it issue marriage licenses virtually.  To reduce the possibility of contagion, the City Clerk’s Office will no longer issue marriages licenses in person, (accept by appointment only, at the discretion of the Chief Clerk), or to any person not residing in Hudson.  Residents of Hudson wishing to obtain a marriage license virtually or to determine if they may obtain a license in person, should contact the Clerk’s office for information about securing a license. 

  3. Beginning May 1, 2020, all City meetings, including Common Council, Planning Board, Zoning Board, Hudson Preservation Commission, Tourism Board and Committee meetings of the Common Council and public hearings held by the Mayor, if any, will held via electronic means.  Per the Governor’s Executive Order, No. 202.1, Article 7 of the Public Officers Law is suspended and the public will not be permitted to attend Common Council meetings or Committee meetings.  Meetings that are held will be live streamed, (instructions will be on the website to access live streaming), and a transcript or minutes, as required, will be made available on the website, following the meeting. Council Members may attend via electronic means. 

  4. Park Space: Pathways, walkways and trails may be used in public parks while keeping at least 6 feet distance between individuals who are not otherwise quarantined together but otherwise, city parks will be closed to the public, including playground areas, basketball courts, and picnic table and BBQ pit areas. The public use of the City’s Dog Park located on Front Street may continue  under the following conditions:
    A) No more than 6 people shall use the park at one time; and 
    B) Park users shall keep at least 6 feet distance between themselves and other people who are not otherwise quarantined together. 

  5. Alternative side of the street parking regulation authorized by section 305-8 of the Hudson City Code and Hudson Police Commissioner Memorandum dated January 5, 1972 is suspended. 

  6. The payment of parking meter fees as required by section 305-20(A) is suspended.  

  7. Payment of late fees for parking tickets issued between February 1, 2020 and April 30, 2020 will be waived but late fees will begin to accrue as of June 15, 2020 if a ticket issued between February 1, 2020 and April 30, 2020 is not paid by June 1, 2020.

  8. All City employees who are present in the workplace shall be provided and shall wear face coverings when in direct contact with customers or members of the public.

In addition to the Orders set forth above, the Governor of the State of New York has issued several Executive Orders as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic which can be viewed here.  https://www.governor.ny.gov/executiveorders  Of particular concern to the people of Hudson please note: 

  1. Per the Governor’s Executive Order 202.10, non-essential gatherings of individuals of any size for any reason (e.g. parties, celebrations or other social events) are canceled or postponed at this time.  This requirement also applies to houses of worship.  

  2. Per the Governor’s Executive Order 202.3, any restaurant or bar in the state of New York shall cease serving patrons food or beverage on-premises effective at 8 pm on March 16, 2020, and until further notice shall only serve food or beverage for off-premises consumption.

  3. Per the Governor’s Executive Order 202.16, for all essential businesses or entities, any employees who are present in the workplace shall be provided and shall wear face coverings when in direct contact with customers or members of the public. Businesses must provide, at their expense, such face coverings for their employees. This provision may be enforced by local governments or local law enforcement as if it were an order pursuant to section 12 or 12-b of the Public Health Law.  This requirement shall be effective Wednesday, April 15 at 8 p.m. 




On May 8, 2020, Mayor Johnson issued an Emergency Order regarding Hudson's response to coronavirus.  

LOCAL STATE OF EMERGENCY ORDER NO. 15

EFFECTIVE: May 8, 2020 AT 12:01 PM THROUGH May 13, 2020 AT 12:00 PM

Pursuant to my proclamation declaring a Local State of Emergency in the City of Hudson, New York on April 22, 2020, I hereby issue Local Emergency Order No. 15. Emergency Order No. 15 will be effective in the City of Hudson, New York for a period of time beginning at 12:00 pm on May 8, 2020 and continuing in effect and ending at 12:00 pm on May 13, 2020, a period not to exceed five (5) days. Such order shall cease to be in effect as of May 13, 2020 at 12:00 pm, or upon my declaration that the state of emergency no longer exists, whichever occurs sooner. This order also may be extended for additional periods not to exceed five days each, during the pendency of the local state of emergency. 

A Local State of Emergency Order may be issued to protect life and property or to bring an emergency situation under control.  Because the uncontrolled spread of COVID-19  threatens or imperils public safety, as Chief Executive of this municipality, I have exercised the authority given to me under New York State Executive Law, Article 2-B, to preserve the public safety and to issue orders rendering and implementing all required and available assistance and polices vital to the security, well-being and health of the citizens of the community at my disposal. Toward that end, I hereby order the following:

  1. The public use of administrative buildings including City Hall, Parks and Recreation, Public Works, the Water Department and the Public Safety Building will be limited.  In order to keep the City running smoothly and staff safe, the City’s administration offices will be significantly reduced. City Hall will be closed to the public except by appointment only for essential services. Pursuant to the Governor’s Executive Order No. 202.17,  all members of the public must wear masks if they enter City Hall as adequate social distancing is not possible in the Clerk’s office due to the configuration of the space. Business in the departments that can be conducted online, such as paying parking tickets, property taxes, and water or other bills, should be done online at the City’s website, http://www.cityofhudson.org or over the phone. All public programs at the Youth Center and Senior Center are canceled. All City employee travel will be restricted, all conferences and workshops will be cancelled.

  2.  Pursuant to Governor’s Executive Order 202.24, Clerks are authorized but not required it issue marriage licenses virtually.  To reduce the possibility of contagion, the City Clerk’s Office will no longer issue marriages licenses in person, (accept by appointment only, at the discretion of the Chief Clerk), or to any person not residing in Hudson.  Residents of Hudson wishing to obtain a marriage license virtually or to determine if they may obtain a license in person, should contact the Clerk’s office for information about securing a license. 

  3. Beginning May 1, 2020, all City meetings, including Common Council, Planning Board, Zoning Board, Hudson Preservation Commission, Tourism Board and Committee meetings of the Common Council and public hearings held by the Mayor, if any, will held via electronic means.  Per the Governor’s Executive Order, No. 202.1, Article 7 of the Public Officers Law is suspended and the public will not be permitted to attend Common Council meetings or Committee meetings.  Meetings that are held will be live streamed, (instructions will be on the website to access live streaming), and a transcript or minutes, as required, will be made available on the website, following the meeting. Council Members may attend via electronic means. 

  4. Park Space: Pathways, walkways and trails may be used in public parks while keeping at least 6 feet distance between individuals who are not otherwise quarantined together but otherwise, city parks will be closed to the public, including playground areas, basketball courts, and picnic table and BBQ pit areas. The public use of the City’s Dog Park located on Front Street may continue  under the following conditions:
    A) No more than 6 people shall use the park at one time; and 
    B) Park users shall keep at least 6 feet distance between themselves and other people who are not otherwise quarantined together. 

  5. Alternative side of the street parking regulation authorized by section 305-8 of the Hudson City Code and Hudson Police Commissioner Memorandum dated January 5, 1972 is suspended. 

  6. The payment of parking meter fees as required by section 305-20(A) is suspended.  

  7. Payment of late fees for parking tickets issued between February 1, 2020 and April 30, 2020 will be waived but late fees will begin to accrue as of June 15, 2020 if a ticket issued between February 1, 2020 and April 30, 2020 is not paid by June 1, 2020.

  8. All City employees who are present in the workplace shall be provided and shall wear face coverings when in direct contact with customers or members of the public.

In addition to the Orders set forth above, the Governor of the State of New York has issued several Executive Orders as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic which can be viewed here.  https://www.governor.ny.gov/executiveorders  Of particular concern to the people of Hudson please note: 

  1. Per the Governor’s Executive Order 202.10, non-essential gatherings of individuals of any size for any reason (e.g. parties, celebrations or other social events) are canceled or postponed at this time.  This requirement also applies to houses of worship.  

  2. Per the Governor’s Executive Order 202.3, any restaurant or bar in the state of New York shall cease serving patrons food or beverage on-premises effective at 8 pm on March 16, 2020, and until further notice shall only serve food or beverage for off-premises consumption.

  3. Per the Governor’s Executive Order 202.16, for all essential businesses or entities, any employees who are present in the workplace shall be provided and shall wear face coverings when in direct contact with customers or members of the public. Businesses must provide, at their expense, such face coverings for their employees. This provision may be enforced by local governments or local law enforcement as if it were an order pursuant to section 12 or 12-b of the Public Health Law.  This requirement shall be effective Wednesday, April 15 at 8 p.m. 

 


 



On May 5, 2020, Mayor Johnson issued an Emergency Order regarding Hudson's response to coronavirus.  

LOCAL STATE OF EMERGENCY ORDER NO. 14

EFFECTIVE: May 5, 2020 AT 12:01 PM THROUGH May 8, 2020 AT 12:00 PM

Pursuant to my proclamation declaring a Local State of Emergency in the City of Hudson, New York on April 22, 2020, I hereby issue Local Emergency Order No. 14. Emergency Order No. 14 will be effective in the City of Hudson, New York for a period of time beginning at 12:00 pm on May 5, 2020 and continuing in effect and ending at 12:00 pm on May 8, 2020, a period not to exceed five (5) days. Such order shall cease to be in effect as of May 8, 2020 at 12:00 pm, or upon my declaration that the state of emergency no longer exists, whichever occurs sooner. This order also may be extended for additional periods not to exceed five days each, during the pendency of the local state of emergency. 

A Local State of Emergency Order may be issued to protect life and property or to bring an emergency situation under control.  Because the uncontrolled spread of COVID-19  threatens or imperils public safety, as Chief Executive of this municipality, I have exercised the authority given to me under New York State Executive Law, Article 2-B, to preserve the public safety and to issue orders rendering and implementing all required and available assistance and polices vital to the security, well-being and health of the citizens of the community at my disposal. Toward that end, I hereby order the following:

  1. The public use of administrative buildings including City Hall, Parks and Recreation, Public Works, the Water Department and the Public Safety Building will be limited.  In order to keep the City running smoothly and staff safe, the City’s administration offices will be significantly reduced. City Hall will be closed to the public except by appointment only for essential services. Pursuant to the Governor’s Executive Order No. 202.17,  all members of the public must wear masks if they enter City Hall as adequate social distancing is not possible in the Clerk’s office due to the configuration of the space. Business in the departments that can be conducted online, such as paying parking tickets, property taxes, and water or other bills, should be done online at the City’s website, http://www.cityofhudson.org or over the phone. All public programs at the Youth Center and Senior Center are canceled. All City employee travel will be restricted, all conferences and workshops will be cancelled.

  2.  Pursuant to Governor’s Executive Order 202.24, Clerks are authorized but not required it issue marriage licenses virtually.  To reduce the possibility of contagion, the City Clerk’s Office will no longer issue marriages licenses in person, (accept by appointment only, at the discretion of the Chief Clerk), or to any person not residing in Hudson.  Residents of Hudson wishing to obtain a marriage license virtually or to determine if they may obtain a license in person, should contact the Clerk’s office for information about securing a license. 

  3. Beginning May 1, 2020, all City meetings, including Common Council, Planning Board, Zoning Board, Hudson Preservation Commission, Tourism Board and Committee meetings of the Common Council and public hearings held by the Mayor, if any, will held via electronic means.  Per the Governor’s Executive Order, No. 202.1, Article 7 of the Public Officers Law is suspended and the public will not be permitted to attend Common Council meetings or Committee meetings.  Meetings that are held will be live streamed, (instructions will be on the website to access live streaming), and a transcript or minutes, as required, will be made available on the website, following the meeting. Council Members may attend via electronic means. 

  4. Park Space: Pathways, walkways and trails may be used in public parks while keeping at least 6 feet distance between individuals who are not otherwise quarantined together but otherwise, city parks will be closed to the public, including playground areas, basketball courts, and picnic table and BBQ pit areas. The public use of the City’s Dog Park located on Front Street may continue  under the following conditions:
    A) No more than 6 people shall use the park at one time; and 
    B) Park users shall keep at least 6 feet distance between themselves and other people who are not otherwise quarantined together. 

  5. Alternative side of the street parking regulation authorized by section 305-8 of the Hudson City Code and Hudson Police Commissioner Memorandum dated January 5, 1972 is suspended. 

  6. The payment of parking meter fees as required by section 305-20(A) is suspended.  

  7. Payment of late fees for parking tickets issued between February 1, 2020 and April 30, 2020 will be waived but late fees will begin to accrue as of June 15, 2020 if a ticket issued between February 1, 2020 and April 30, 2020 is not paid by June 1, 2020.

  8. All City employees who are present in the workplace shall be provided and shall wear face coverings when in direct contact with customers or members of the public.

In addition to the Orders set forth above, the Governor of the State of New York has issued several Executive Orders as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic which can be viewed here.  https://www.governor.ny.gov/executiveorders  Of particular concern to the people of Hudson please note: 

  1. Per the Governor’s Executive Order 202.10, non-essential gatherings of individuals of any size for any reason (e.g. parties, celebrations or other social events) are canceled or postponed at this time.  This requirement also applies to houses of worship.  

  2. Per the Governor’s Executive Order 202.3, any restaurant or bar in the state of New York shall cease serving patrons food or beverage on-premises effective at 8 pm on March 16, 2020, and until further notice shall only serve food or beverage for off-premises consumption.

  3. Per the Governor’s Executive Order 202.16, for all essential businesses or entities, any employees who are present in the workplace shall be provided and shall wear face coverings when in direct contact with customers or members of the public. Businesses must provide, at their expense, such face coverings for their employees. This provision may be enforced by local governments or local law enforcement as if it were an order pursuant to section 12 or 12-b of the Public Health Law.  This requirement shall be effective Wednesday, April 15 at 8 p.m. 


 On April 30, 2020, Mayor Johnson issued an Emergency Order regarding Hudson's response to coronavirus.  

LOCAL STATE OF EMERGENCY ORDER NO. 13

EFFECTIVE: APRIL 30, 2020 AT 12:00 PM THROUGH May 5, 2020 AT 12:00 PM

Pursuant to my proclamation declaring a Local State of Emergency in the City of Hudson, New York on March 16, 2020, I hereby issue Local Emergency Order No. 13. Emergency Order No. 13 will be effective in the City of Hudson, New York for a period of time beginning at 12:00 pm on April 30, 2020 and continuing in effect and ending at 12:00 pm on May 5, 2020, a period not to exceed five (5) days. Such order shall cease to be in effect as of May 5, 2020 at 12:00 pm, or upon my declaration that the state of emergency no longer exists, whichever occurs sooner. This order also may be extended for additional periods not to exceed five days each, during the pendency of the local state of emergency.  

A Local State of Emergency Order may be issued to protect life and property or to bring an emergency situation under control.  Because the uncontrolled spread of COVID-19  threatens or imperils public safety, as Chief Executive of this municipality, I have exercised the authority given to me under New York State Executive Law, Article 2-B, to preserve the public safety and to issue orders rendering and implementing all required and available assistance and polices vital to the security, well-being and health of the citizens of the community at my disposal. Toward that end, I hereby order the following:

  1. The public use of administrative buildings including City Hall, Parks and Recreation, Public Works, the Water Department and the Public Safety Building will be limited.  In order to keep the City running smoothly and staff safe, the City’s administration offices will be significantly reduced. City Hall will be closed to the public except by appointment only for essential services. Pursuant to the Governor’s Executive Order No. 202.17,  all members of the public must wear masks if they enter City Hall as adequate social distancing is not possible in the Clerk’s office due to the configuration of the space. Business in the departments that can be conducted online, such as paying parking tickets, property taxes, and water or other bills, should be done online at the City’s website, http://www.cityofhudson.org or over the phone. All public programs at the Youth Center and Senior Center are canceled. All City employee travel will be restricted, all conferences and workshops will be cancelled. 

  2. Effective April 27, 2020, the City Clerk’s Office will begin issuing marriages licenses under the following conditions:

    • The couple must print and complete the marriage license worksheet located on the city website (www.cityofhudson.org) prior to the scheduled appointment.

    • The couple must arrive on time, with the completed marriage license worksheet and all other required documents as described on the city website.  Failure to arrive at the scheduled time will result in the cancellation of the appointment and the couple will have to re-schedule.  

    • The couple must wear face masks at all times, as adequate social distancing is not always possible in the Clerk’s office. 

    • Access will be given to the couple only.  Please do not bring any other person to the Clerk’s Office when applying for the marriage license.  

    • The fee is $40 and the Clerk’s Office does not accept any credit/debit cards.  Plan accordingly.  

  3. Beginning May 1, 2020, all City meetings, including Common Council, Planning Board, Zoning Board, Hudson Preservation Commission, Tourism Board and Committee meetings of the Common Council and public hearings held by the Mayor, if any, will held via electronic means.  Per the Governor’s Executive Order, No. 202.1, Article 7 of the Public Officers Law is suspended and the public will not be permitted to attend Common Council meetings or Committee meetings.  Meetings that are held will be live streamed, (instructions will be on the website to access live streaming), and a transcript or minutes, as required, will be made available  on the website, following the meeting. Council Members may attend via electronic means. 

  4. Park Space: Pathways, walkways and trails may be used in public parks while keeping at least 6 feet distance between individuals who are not otherwise quarantined together but otherwise, city parks will be closed to the public, including playground areas, basketball courts, and picnic table and BBQ pit areas. The public use of the City’s Dog Park located on Front Street may continue  under the following conditions: 
    A) No more than 6 people shall use the park at one time; and 
    B) Park users shall keep at least 6 feet distance between themselves and other people who are not otherwise quarantined together. 

  5. Alternative side of the street parking regulation authorized by section 305-8 of the Hudson City Code and Hudson Police Commissioner Memorandum dated January 5, 1972 is suspended. 

  6. The payment of parking meter fees as required by section 305-20(A) is suspended.  

  7. Payment of late fees for parking tickets issued between February 1, 2020 and April 30, 2020 will be waived but late fees will begin to accrue as of June 15, 2020 if a ticket issued between February 1, 2020 and April 30, 2020 is not paid by June 1, 2020.

  8. All City employees who are present in the workplace shall be provided and shall wear face coverings when in direct contact with customers or members of the public.

In addition to the Orders set forth above, the Governor of the State of New York has issued several Executive Orders as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic which can be viewed here.  https://www.governor.ny.gov/executiveorders  Of particular concern to the people of Hudson please note: 

  1. Per the Governor’s Executive Order 202.10, non-essential gatherings of individuals of any size for any reason (e.g. parties, celebrations or other social events) are canceled or postponed at this time.  This requirement also applies to houses of worship.  

  2. Per the Governor’s Executive Order 202.3, any restaurant or bar in the state of New York shall cease serving patrons food or beverage on-premises effective at 8 pm on March 16, 2020, and until further notice shall only serve food or beverage for off-premises consumption.

  3. Per the Governor’s Executive Order 202.16, for all essential businesses or entities, any employees who are present in the workplace shall be provided and shall wear face coverings when in direct contact with customers or members of the public. Businesses must provide, at their expense, such face coverings for their employees. This provision may be enforced by local governments or local law enforcement as if it were an order pursuant to section 12 or 12-b of the Public Health Law.  This requirement shall be effective Wednesday, April 15 at 8 p.m. 


 On April 25, 2020, Mayor Johnson issued an Emergency Order regarding Hudson's response to coronavirus.  

LOCAL STATE OF EMERGENCY ORDER NO. 12

EFFECTIVE: APRIL 25, 2020 AT 8:00 PM THROUGH APRIL 30, 2020 AT 12:00 PM

Pursuant to my proclamation declaring a Local State of Emergency in the City of Hudson, New York on March 16, 2020, I hereby issue Local Emergency OrderNo.  12. Emergency Order No. 12 will be effective in the City of Hudson, New York for a period of time beginning at 8:00 pm on April 25, 2020 and continuing in effect and ending at 12:00 pm on April 30, 2020, a period not to exceed five (5) days. Such order shall cease to be in effect as of April 30, 2020 at 12:00 pm, or upon my declaration that the state of emergency no longer exists, whichever occurs sooner. This order also may be extended for additional periods not to exceed five days each, during the pendency of the local state of emergency.

A Local State of Emergency Order may be issued to protect life and property or to bring an emergency situation under control.  Because the uncontrolled spread of COVID-19  threatens or imperils public safety, as Chief Executive of this municipality, I have exercised the authority given to me under New York State Executive Law, Article 2-B, to preserve the public safety and to issue orders rendering and implementing all required and available assistance and polices vital to the security, well-being and health of the citizens of the community at my disposal. Toward that end, I hereby order the following:

  1. The public use of administrative buildings including City Hall, Parks and Recreation, Public Works, the Water Department and the Public Safety Building will be limited.  In order to keep the City running smoothly and staff safe, the City’s administration offices will be significantly reduced. City Hall will be closed to the public except by appointment only for essential services. Pursuant to the Governor’s Executive Order No. 202.17,  all members of the public must wear masks if they enter City Hall as adequate social distancing is not possible in the Clerk’s office due to the configuration of the space. Business in the departments that can be conducted online, such as paying parking tickets, property taxes, and water or other bills, should be done online at the City’s website, http://www.cityofhudson.org or over the phone. All public programs at the Youth Center and Senior Center are canceled. All City employee travel will be restricted, all conferences and workshops will be cancelled.

  2. Effective April 27, 2020, the City Clerk’s Office will begin issuing marriages licenses under the following conditions:

    • The couple must print and complete the marriage license worksheet located on the city website (www.cityofhudson.org) prior to the scheduled appointment.

    • The couple must arrive on time, with the completed marriage license worksheet and all other required documents as described on the city website.  Failure to arrive at the scheduled time will result in the cancellation of the appointment and the couple will have to re-schedule.  

    • The couple must wear face masks at all times, as adequate social distancing is not always possible in the Clerk’s office. 

    • Access will be given to the couple only.  Please do not bring any other person to the Clerk’s Office when applying for the marriage license.  

    • The fee is $40 and the Clerk’s Office does not accept any credit/debit cards.  Plan accordingly.  

  3. Beginning May 1, 2020, all City meetings, including Common Council, Planning Board, Zoning Board, Hudson Preservation Commission, Tourism Board and Committee meetings of the Common Council and public hearings held by the Mayor, if any, will held via electronic means.  Per the Governor’s Executive Order, No. 202.1, Article 7 of the Public Officers Law is suspended and the public will not be permitted to attend Common Council meetings or Committee meetings.  Meetings that are held will be live streamed, (instructions will be on the website to access live streaming), and a transcript or minutes, as required, will be made available  on the website, following the meeting. Council Members may attend via electronic means. 

  4. Park Space: Pathways, walkways and trails may be used in public parks while keeping at least 6 feet distance between individuals who are not otherwise quarantined together but otherwise, city parks will be closed to the public, including playground areas, basketball courts, and picnic table and BBQ pit areas. The public use of the City’s Dog Park located on Front Street may continue  under the following conditions: 
    A) No more than 6 people shall use the park at one time; and 
    B) Park users shall keep at least 6 feet distance between themselves and other people who are not otherwise quarantined together. 

  5. Alternative side of the street parking regulation authorized by section 305-8 of the Hudson City Code and Hudson Police Commissioner Memorandum dated January 5, 1972 is suspended. 

  6. The payment of parking meter fees as required by section 305-20(A) is suspended.  

  7. Payment of late fees for parking tickets issued between February 1, 2020 and April 30, 2020 will be waived but late fees will begin to accrue as of June 15, 2020 if a ticket issued between February 1, 2020 and April 30, 2020 is not paid by June 1, 2020.

  8. All City employees who are present in the workplace shall be provided and shall wear face coverings when in direct contact with customers or members of the public.

In addition to the Orders set forth above, the Governor of the State of New York has issued several Executive Orders as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic which can be viewed here.  https://www.governor.ny.gov/executiveorders  Of particular concern to the people of Hudson please note: 

  1. Per the Governor’s Executive Order 202.10, non-essential gatherings of individuals of any size for any reason (e.g. parties, celebrations or other social events) are canceled or postponed at this time.  This requirement also applies to houses of worship.  

  2. Per the Governor’s Executive Order 202.3, any restaurant or bar in the state of New York shall cease serving patrons food or beverage on-premises effective at 8 pm on March 16, 2020, and until further notice shall only serve food or beverage for off-premises consumption.

  3. Per the Governor’s Executive Order 202.16, for all essential businesses or entities, any employees who are present in the workplace shall be provided and shall wear face coverings when in direct contact with customers or members of the public. Businesses must provide, at their expense, such face coverings for their employees. This provision may be enforced by local governments or local law enforcement as if it were an order pursuant to section 12 or 12-b of the Public Health Law.  This requirement shall be effective Wednesday, April 15 at 8 p.m.  







On April 22, 2020, Mayor Johnson issued an Emergency Order regarding Hudson's response to coronavirus.  

LOCAL STATE OF EMERGENCY ORDER NO. 11

EFFECTIVE: APRIL 22, 2020 AT 12:01 PM THROUGH APRIL 24, 2020 AT 12:00 PM

Pursuant to my proclamation declaring a Local State of Emergency in the City of Hudson, New York on March 16, 2020, I hereby issue Local Emergency Order No. 11. Emergency Order No. 11 will be effective in the City of Hudson, New York for a period of time beginning at 12:01 pm on April 22, 2020 and continuing in effect and ending at 12:00 pm on April 24, 2020, a period not to exceed five (5) days. Such order shall cease to be in effect as of April 24, 2020 at 12:00 pm, or upon my declaration that the state of emergency no longer exists, whichever occurs sooner. This order also may be extended for additional periods not to exceed five days each, during the pendency of the local state of emergency. 

A Local State of Emergency Order may be issued to protect life and property or to bring an emergency situation under control. Because the uncontrolled spread of COVID-19 threatens or imperils public safety, as Chief Executive of this municipality, I have exercised the authority given to me under New York State Executive Law, Article 2-B, to preserve the public safety and to issue orders rendering and implementing all required and available assistance and polices vital to the security, well-being and health of the citizens of the community at my disposal. Toward that end, I hereby order the following: 

1) The public use of administrative buildings including City Hall, Parks and Recreation, Public Works, the Water Department and the Public Safety Building will be limited. In order to keep the City running smoothly and staff safe, the City’s administration offices will be significantly reduced. City Hall will be closed to the public except by appointment only for essential services. Business in the departments that can be conducted online, such as paying parking tickets, property taxes, and water or other bills, should be done online at the City’s website, http://www.cityofhudson.org or over the phone. All public programs at the Youth Center and Senior Center are canceled. All City employee travel will be restricted, all conferences and workshops will be cancelled. 

2) All non-essential City meetings will be canceled. Common Council meetings will be held but all other meetings of public Boards and Commissions, including the Planning Board, Zoning Board and Hudson Preservation Commission will be cancelled for the duration of this Order. Committee meetings of the Council may be held at the discretion of the Council President. 

3) Park Space: Pathways, walkways and trails may be used in public parks while keeping at least 6 feet distance between individuals who are not otherwise quarantined together but otherwise, city parks will be closed to the public, including playground areas, basketball courts, and picnic table and BBQ pit areas. The public use of the City’s Dog Park located on Front Street may continue under the following conditions: 

a) No more than 6 people shall use the park at one time; and

b) Park users shall keep at least 6 feet distance between themselves and other people who are not otherwise quarantined together. 

4) Alternative side of the street parking regulation authorized by section 305-8 of the Hudson City Code and Hudson Police Commissioner Memorandum dated January 5, 1972 is suspended. 5) The payment of parking meter fees as required by section 305-20(A) is suspended. 6) Payment of late fees for parking tickets issued between February 1, 2020 and April 30, 2020 will be waived but late fees will begin to accrue as of June 15, 2020 if a ticket issued between February 1, 2020 and April 30, 2020 is not paid by June 1, 2020. 7) All City employees who are present in the workplace shall be provided and shall wear face coverings when in direct contact with customers or members of the public. 

In addition to the Orders set forth above, the Governor of the State of New York has issued several Executive Orders as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic which can be viewed here. https://www.governor.ny.gov/executiveorders Of particular concern to the people of Hudson please note: 

I. Per the Governor’s Executive Order, https://www.governor.ny.gov/news/no-2023-continuing-temporary-suspension-and-modification-laws-relating-disaster-emergency events and other gatherings have been severely limited. Accordingly, no large public gatherings of more than 50 people may be held as per the Governor’s order, as such conditions threaten or imperil the public safety of the citizens of Hudson. This requirement also applies to houses of worship.

II. Per the Governor’s Executive Order https://www.governor.ny.gov/news/no-2023-continuing-temporary-suspension-and-modification-laws-relating-disaster-emergency any restaurant or bar in the state of New York shall cease serving patrons food or beverage on-premises effective at 8 pm on March 16, 2020, and until further notice shall only serve food or beverage for off-premises consumption.

III. Per the Governor’s Executive Order, https://www.governor.ny.gov/news/no-20216-continuing-temporary-suspension-and-modification-laws-relating-disaster-emergency, for all essential businesses or entities, any employees who are present in the workplace shall be provided and shall wear face coverings when in direct contact with customers or members of the public. Businesses must provide, at their expense, such face coverings for their employees. This provision may be enforced by local governments or local law enforcement as if it were an order pursuant to section 12 or 12-b of the Public Health Law. This requirement shall be effective Wednesday, April 15 at 8 p.m.  


On April 17, 2020, Mayor Johnson issued an Emergency Order regarding Hudson's response to coronavirus.  

LOCAL STATE OF EMERGENCY ORDER NO. 10

EFFECTIVE: APRIL 17, 2020 AT 12:01 PM THROUGH APRIL 22, 2020 AT 12:00 PM

Pursuant to my proclamation declaring a Local State of Emergency in the City of Hudson, New York on March 16, 2020, I hereby issue Local Emergency OrderNo. 10. Emergency Order No. 10 will be effective in the City of Hudson, New York for a period of time beginning at 12:01 pm on April 17, 2020 and continuing in effect and ending at 12:00 pm on April 22, 2020, a period not to exceed five (5) days. Such order shall cease to be in effect as of April 22, 2020 at 12:00 pm, or upon my declaration that the state of emergency no longer exists, whichever occurs sooner. This order also may be extended for additional periods not to exceed five days each, during the pendency of the local state of emergency. 

A Local State of Emergency Order may be issued to protect life and property or to bring an emergency situation under control.  Because the uncontrolled spread of COVID-19  threatens or imperils public safety, as Chief Executive of this municipality, I have exercised the authority given to me under New York State Executive Law, Article 2-B, to preserve the public safety and to issue orders rendering and implementing all required and available assistance and polices vital to the security, well-being and health of the citizens of the community at my disposal. Toward that end, I hereby order the following:

  1. The public use of administrative buildings including City Hall, Parks and Recreation, Public Works, the Water Department and the Public Safety Building will be limited.  In order to keep the City running smoothly and staff safe, the City’s administration offices will be significantly reduced. City Hall will be closed to the public except by appointment only for essential services. Business in the departments that can be conducted online, such as paying parking tickets, property taxes, and water or other bills, should be done online at the City’s website, http://www.cityofhudson.org or over the phone. All public programs at the Youth Center and Senior Center are canceled. All City employee travel will be restricted, all conferences and workshops will be cancelled. 

  2. All non-essential City meetings will be canceled. Common Council meetings will be held but all other meetings of public Boards and Commissions, including the Planning Board, Zoning Board and Hudson Preservation Commission will be cancelled for the duration of this Order.  Committee meetings of the Council may be held at the discretion of the Council President. 

  3. Notwithstanding paragraph 2, the Hudson Tourism Board shall be permitted to meet as per paragraph 4, if convened at the request of the Mayor or Common Council President to address the urgent needs of the business community in Hudson which is being significantly and adversely impacted by the COVID-19  pandemic. 

  4. Per the Governor’s Executive Order, https://www.governor.ny.gov/news/no-2021-continuing-temporary-suspension-and-modification-laws-relating-disaster-emergency, Article 7 of the Public Officers Law is suspended and the public will not be permitted to attend Common Council meetings or Committee meetings, if held, in person.  Meetings that are held will be live streamed, (instructions will be on the website to access live streaming), and a transcript or minutes, as required, will be made available  on the website, following the meeting. Council Members may attend via electronic means. 

  5. Park Space: Pathways, walkways and trails may be used in public parks while keeping at least 6 feet distance between individuals who are not otherwise quarantined together but otherwise, city parks will be closed to the public, including playground areas, basketball courts, and picnic table and BBQ pit areas. The public use of the City’s Dog Park located on Front Street may continue  under the following conditions: 
    A) No more than 6 people shall use the park at one time; and 
    B) Park users shall keep at least 6 feet distance between themselves and other people who are not otherwise quarantined together. 

  1. Alternative side of the street parking regulation authorized by section 305-8 of the Hudson City Code and Hudson Police Commissioner Memorandum dated January 5, 1972 is suspended. 

  2. The payment of parking meter fees as required by section 305-20(A) is suspended.  

  3. Payment of late fees for parking tickets issued between February 1, 2020 and April 30, 2020 will be waived but late fees will begin to accrue as of June 15, 2020 if a ticket issued between February 1, 2020 and April 30, 2020 is not paid by June 1, 2020.

  4. All City employees who are present in the workplace shall be provided and shall wear face coverings when in direct contact with customers or members of the public.

In addition to the Orders set forth above, the Governor of the State of New York has issued several Executive Orders as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic which can be viewed here.  https://www.governor.ny.gov/executiveorders  Of particular concern to the people of Hudson please note: 

  1. Per the Governor’s Executive Order, https://www.governor.ny.gov/news/no-2023-continuing-temporary-suspension-and-modification-laws-relating-disaster-emergency events and other gatherings have been severely limited. Accordingly, no largepublic gatherings of more than 50 people may be held as per the Governor’s order, as such conditions threaten or imperil the public safety of the citizens of Hudson. This requirement also applies to houses of worship.  

  2. Per the Governor’s Executive Order https://www.governor.ny.gov/news/no-2023-continuing-temporary-suspension-and-modification-laws-relating-disaster-emergency  any restaurant or bar in the state of New York shall cease serving patrons food or beverage on-premises effective at 8 pm on March 16, 2020, and until further notice shall only serve food or beverage for off-premises consumption.

  3. Per the Governor’s Executive Order, https://www.governor.ny.gov/news/no-20216-continuing-temporary-suspension-and-modification-laws-relating-disaster-emergencyfor all essential businesses or entities, any employees who are present in the workplace shall be provided and shall wear face coverings when in direct contact with customers or members of the public. Businesses must provide, at their expense, such face coverings for their employees. This provision may be enforced by local governments or local law enforcement as if it were an order pursuant to section 12 or 12-b of the Public Health Law.  This requirement shall be effective Wednesday, April 15 at 8 p.m. 

 

On April 15, 2020, Mayor Johnson issued an Emergency Order regarding Hudson's response to coronavirus.  

LOCAL STATE OF EMERGENCY ORDER NO. 9

EFFECTIVE: APRIL 15, 2020 AT 12:01 PM THROUGH APRIL 17, 2020 AT 12:00 PM

Pursuant to my proclamation declaring a Local State of Emergency in the City of Hudson, New York on March 16, 2020, I hereby issue Local Emergency OrderNo. 9. Emergency Order No. 9 will be effective in the City of Hudson, New York for a period of time beginning at 12:01 pm on April 15, 2020 and continuing in effect and ending at 12:00 pm on April 17, 2020, a period not to exceed five (5) days. Such order shall cease to be in effect as of April 17, 2020 at 12:00 pm, or upon my declaration that the state of emergency no longer exists, whichever occurs sooner. This order also may be extended for additional periods not to exceed five days each, during the pendency of the local state of emergency. 

A Local State of Emergency Order may be issued to protect life and property or to bring an emergency situation under control.  Because the uncontrolled spread of COVID-19  threatens or imperils public safety, as Chief Executive of this municipality, I have exercised the authority given to me under New York State Executive Law, Article 2-B, to preserve the public safety and to issue orders rendering and implementing all required and available assistance and polices vital to the security, well-being and health of the citizens of the community at my disposal. Toward that end, I hereby order the following:

  1. The public use of administrative buildings including City Hall, Parks and Recreation, Public Works, the Water Department and the Public Safety Building will be limited.  In order to keep the City running smoothly and staff safe, the City’s administration offices will be significantly reduced. City Hall will be closed to the public except by appointment only for essential services. Business in the departments that can be conducted online, such as paying parking tickets, property taxes, and water or other bills, should be done online at the City’s website, http://www.cityofhudson.org or over the phone. All public programs at the Youth Center and Senior Center are canceled. All City employee travel will be restricted, all conferences and workshops will be cancelled. 

  2. All non-essential City meetings will be canceled. Common Council meetings will be held but all other meetings of public Boards and Commissions, including the Planning Board, Zoning Board and Hudson Preservation Commission will be cancelled for the duration of this Order.  Committee meetings of the Council may be held at the discretion of the Council President. 

  3. Notwithstanding paragraph 2, the Hudson Tourism Board shall be permitted to meet as per paragraph 4, if convened at the request of the Mayor or Common Council President to address the urgent needs of the business community in Hudson which is being significantly and adversely impacted by the COVID-19  pandemic. 

  4. Per the Governor’s Executive Order, https://www.governor.ny.gov/news/no-2021-continuing-temporary-suspension-and-modification-laws-relating-disaster-emergency, Article 7 of the Public Officers Law is suspended and the public will not be permitted to attend Common Council meetings or Committee meetings, if held, in person.  Meetings that are held will be live streamed, (instructions will be on the website to access live streaming), and a transcript or minutes, as required, will be made available  on the website, following the meeting. Council Members may attend via electronic means. 

  5. Park Space: Pathways, walkways and trails may be used in public parks while keeping at least 6 feet distance between individuals who are not otherwise quarantined together but otherwise, city parks will be closed to the public, including playground areas, basketball courts, and picnic table and BBQ pit areas. The public use of the City’s Dog Park located on Front Street may continue  under the following conditions: 

    A) No more than 6 people shall use the park at one time; and 
    B) Park users shall keep at least 6 feet distance between themselves and other people who are not otherwise quarantined together. 

  6. Alternative side of the street parking regulation authorized by section 305-8 of the Hudson City Code and Hudson Police Commissioner Memorandum dated January 5, 1972 is suspended. 
  7. The payment of parking meter fees as required by section 305-20(A) is suspended.  

  8. Payment of late fees for parking tickets issued between February 1, 2020 and April 30, 2020 will be waived but late fees will begin to accrue as of June 15, 2020 if a ticket issued between February 1, 2020 and April 30, 2020 is not paid by June 1, 2020.

  9. All City employees who are present in the workplace shall be provided and shall wear face coverings when in direct contact with customers or members of the public.

In addition to the Orders set forth above, the Governor of the State of New York has issued several Executive Orders as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic which can be viewed here.  https://www.governor.ny.gov/executiveorders  Of particular concern to the people of Hudson please note: 

  1. Per the Governor’s Executive Order, https://www.governor.ny.gov/news/no-2023-continuing-temporary-suspension-and-modification-laws-relating-disaster-emergency events and other gatherings have been severely limited. Accordingly, no largepublic gatherings of more than 50 people may be held as per the Governor’s order, as such conditions threaten or imperil the public safety of the citizens of Hudson. This requirement also applies to houses of worship.  

  2. Per the Governor’s Executive Order https://www.governor.ny.gov/news/no-2023-continuing-temporary-suspension-and-modification-laws-relating-disaster-emergency  any restaurant or bar in the state of New York shall cease serving patrons food or beverage on-premises effective at 8 pm on March 16, 2020, and until further notice shall only serve food or beverage for off-premises consumption.

  3. Per the Governor’s Executive Order, https://www.governor.ny.gov/news/no-20216-continuing-temporary-suspension-and-modification-laws-relating-disaster-emergencyfor all essential businesses or entities, any employees who are present in the workplace shall be provided and shall wear face coverings when in direct contact with customers or members of the public. Businesses must provide, at their expense, such face coverings for their employees. This provision may be enforced by local governments or local law enforcement as if it were an order pursuant to section 12 or 12-b of the Public Health Law.  This requirement shall be effective Wednesday, April 15 at 8 p.m.  


On April 10, 2020, Mayor Johnson issued an Emergency Order regarding Hudson's response to coronavirus.  

LOCAL STATE OF EMERGENCY ORDER NO. 8

EFFECTIVE: APRIL 10, 2020 AT 12:00 PM THROUGH APRIL 15, 2020 AT 12:00 PM

Pursuant to my proclamation declaring a Local State of Emergency in the City of Hudson, New York on March 16, 2020, I hereby issue Local Emergency Order No. 8. Emergency Order No. 8 will be effective in the City of Hudson, New York for a period of time beginning at 12:00 pm on April 10, 2020 and continuing in effect and ending at 12:00 pm on April 15, 2020, a period not to exceed five (5) days. Such order shall cease to be in effect as of April 15, 2020 at 12:00 pm, or upon my declaration that the state of emergency no longer exists, whichever occurs sooner. This order also may be extended for additional periods not to exceed five days each, during the pendency of the local state of emergency.

A Local State of Emergency Order may be issued to protect life and property or to bring an emergency situation under control.

Because the uncontrolled spread of COVID-19  threatens or imperils public safety, as Chief Executive of this municipality, I have exercised the authority given to me under New York State Executive Law, Article 2-B, to preserve the public safety and to issue orders rendering and implementing all required and available assistance and polices vital to the security, well-being and health of the citizens of the community at my disposal. Toward that end, I hereby order the following:

  1. The public use of administrative buildings including City Hall, Parks and Recreation, Public Works, the Water Department and the Public Safety Building will be limited.  In order to keep the City running smoothly and staff safe, the City’s administration offices will be significantly reduced. City Hall will be closed to the public except by appointment only for essential services. Business in the departments that can be conducted online, such as paying parking tickets, property taxes, and water or other bills, should be done online at the City’s website, http://www.cityofhudson.org or over the phone. All public programs at the Youth Center and Senior Center are canceled. All City employee travel will be restricted, all conferences and workshops will be cancelled.

  2. All non-essential City meetings will be canceled. Common Council meetings will be held but all other meetings of public Boards and Commissions, including the Planning Board, Zoning Board and Hudson Preservation Commission will be cancelled for the duration of this Order.  Committee meetings of the Council may be held at the discretion of the Council President. 

  3. Notwithstanding paragraph 2, the Hudson Tourism Board shall be permitted to meet as per paragraph 4, if convened at the request of the Mayor or Common Council President to address the urgent needs of the business community in Hudson which is being significantly and adversely impacted by the COVID-19  pandemic.

  4. Per the Governor’s Executive Order, https://www.governor.ny.gov/news/no-2021-continuing-temporary-suspension-and-modification-laws-relating-disaster-emergency, Article 7 of the Public Officers Law is suspended and the public will not be permitted to attend Common Council meetings or Committee meetings, if held, in person.  Meetings that are held will be live streamed, (instructions will be on the website to access live streaming), and a transcript or minutes, as required, will be made available on the website, following the meeting. Council Members may attend via electronic means. 

  5. Park Space: Pathways, walkways and trails may be used in public parks while keeping at least 6 feet distance between individuals who are not otherwise quarantined together but otherwise, city parks will be closed to the public, including playground areas, basketball courts, and picnic table and BBQ pit areas. The public use of the City’s Dog Park located on Front Street may continue  under the following conditions: 
    a) No more than 6 people shall use the park at one time; and 
    b) Park users shall keep at least 6 feet distance between themselves and other people who are not otherwise quarantined together. 

  6. Alternative side of the street parking regulation authorized by section 305-8 of the Hudson City Code and Hudson Police Commissioner Memorandum dated January 5, 1972 is suspended. 

  7. The payment of parking meter fees as required by section 305-20(A) is suspended.  

  8. Payment of late fees for parking tickets issued between February 1, 2020 and April 30, 2020 will be waived but late fees will begin to accrue as of June 15, 2020 if a ticket issued between February 1, 2020 and April 30, 2020 is not paid by June 1, 2020. 

In addition to the Orders set forth above, the Governor of the State of New York has issued several Executive Orders as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic which can be viewed here.  https://www.governor.ny.gov/executiveorders  Of particular concern to the people of Hudson please note: 

  1. Per the Governor’s Executive Order, https://www.governor.ny.gov/news/no-2023-continuing-temporary-suspension-and-modification-laws-relating-disaster-emergency events and other gatherings have been severely limited. Accordingly, no large public gatherings of more than 50 people may be held as per the Governor’s order, as such conditions threaten or imperil the public safety of the citizens of Hudson. This requirement also applies to houses of worship.

  2. Per the Governor’s Executive Order https://www.governor.ny.gov/news/no-2023-continuing-temporary-suspension-and-modification-laws-relating-disaster-emergency  any restaurant or bar in the state of New York shall cease serving patrons food or beverage on-premises effective at 8 pm on March 16, 2020, and until further notice shall only serve food or beverage for off-premises consumption. 


On April 7, 2020, Mayor Johnson issued an Emergency Order regarding Hudson's response to coronavirus.  

LOCAL STATE OF EMERGENCY ORDER NO. 7

EFFECTIVE: APRIL 7, 2020 AT 6:00 PM THROUGH APRIL 10, 2020 AT 12:00 PM

Pursuant to my proclamation declaring a Local State of Emergency in the City of Hudson, New York on March 16, 2020, I hereby issue Local Emergency OrderNo. 7. Emergency Order No. 7 will be effective in the City of Hudson, New York for a period of time beginning at 6:00 pm on April 7, 2020 and continuing in effect and ending at 12:00 pm on April 10, 2020, a period not to exceed five (5) days. Such order shall cease to be in effect as of April 10, 2020 at 12:00 pm, or upon my declaration that the state of emergency no longer exists, whichever occurs sooner. This order also may be extended for additional periods not to exceed five days each, during the pendency of the local state of emergency.  

A Local State of Emergency Order may be issued to protect life and property or to bring an emergency situation under control.

Because the uncontrolled spread of COVID-19  threatens or imperils public safety, as Chief Executive of this municipality, I have exercised the authority given to me under New York State Executive Law, Article 2-B, to preserve the public safety and to issue orders rendering and implementing all required and available assistance and polices vital to the security, well-being and health of the citizens of the community at my disposal. Toward that end, I hereby order the following:

  1. The public use of administrative buildings including City Hall, Parks and Recreation, Public Works, the Water Department and the Public Safety Building will be limited.  In order to keep the City running smoothly and staff safe, the City’s administration offices will be significantly reduced. City Hall will be closed to the public except by appointment only for essential services. Business in the departments that can be conducted online, such as paying parking tickets, property taxes, and water or other bills, should be done online at the City’s website, http://www.cityofhudson.org or over the phone. All public programs at the Youth Center and Senior Center are canceled. All City employee travel will be restricted, all conferences and workshops will be cancelled. 

  1. All non-essential City meetings will be canceled. Common Council meetings will be held but all other meetings of public Boards and Commissions, including the Planning Board, Zoning Board and Hudson Preservation Commission will be cancelled for the duration of this Order.  Committee meetings of the Council may be held at the discretion of the Council President. 

  1. Notwithstanding paragraph 2, the Hudson Tourism Board shall be permitted to meet as per paragraph 4, if convened at the request of the Mayor or Common Council President to address the urgent needs of the business community in Hudson which is being significantly and adversely impacted by the COVID-19  pandemic. 

  2. Per the Governor’s Executive Order, https://www.governor.ny.gov/news/no-2021-continuing-temporary-suspension-and-modification-laws-relating-disaster-emergency, Article 7 of the Public Officers Law is suspended and the public will not be permitted to attend Common Council meetings or Committee meetings, if held, in person.  Meetings that are held will be live streamed, (instructions will be on the website to access live streaming), and a transcript or minutes, as required, will be made available  on the website, following the meeting. Council Members may attend via electronic means. 

  3. Park Space: Pathways, walkways and trails may be used in public parks while keeping at least 6 feet distance between individuals who are not otherwise quarantined together but otherwise, city parks will be closed to the public, including playground areas, basketball courts, and picnic table and BBQ pit areas. The public use of the City’s Dog Park located on Front Street may continue  under the following conditions: 

    A) No more than 6 people shall use the park at one time; and 
    B) Park users shall keep at least 6 feet distance between themselves and other people who are not otherwise quarantined together. 

  1. Alternative side of the street parking regulation authorized by section 305-8 of the Hudson City Code and Hudson Police Commissioner Memorandum dated January 5, 1972 is suspended. 

  2. The payment of parking meter fees as required by section 305-20(A) is suspended.  

  3. Payment of late fees for parking tickets issued between February 1, 2020 and March 31, 2020 will be waived but fees will begin to accrue as of  June 15, 2020 if a ticket issued between February 1, 2020 and March 31, 2020 is not paid by June 1, 2020. 

In addition to the Orders set forth above, the Governor of the State of New York has issued several Executive Orders as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic which can be viewed here.  https://www.governor.ny.gov/executiveorders  Of particular concern to the people of Hudson please note: 

  1. Per the Governor’s Executive Order, https://www.governor.ny.gov/news/no-2023-continuing-temporary-suspension-and-modification-laws-relating-disaster-emergency events and other gatherings have been severely limited. Accordingly, no largepublic gatherings of more than 50 people may be held as per the Governor’s order, as such conditions threaten or imperil the public safety of the citizens of Hudson. This requirement also applies to houses of worship.  

  2. Per the Governor’s Executive Order https://www.governor.ny.gov/news/no-2023-continuing-temporary-suspension-and-modification-laws-relating-disaster-emergency  any restaurant or bar in the state of New York shall cease serving patrons food or beverage on-premises effective at 8 pm on March 16, 2020, and until further notice shall only serve food or beverage for off-premises consumption. 


On March 31, 2020, Mayor Johnson issued an Emergency Order regarding Hudson's response to coronavirus.  

LOCAL STATE OF EMERGENCY ORDER NO. 6

EFFECTIVE: MARCH 31, 2020 AT 12:00 PM THROUGH APRIL 5, 2020 AT 12:00 PM

Pursuant to my proclamation declaring a Local State of Emergency in the City of Hudson, New York on March 16, 2020, I hereby issue Local Emergency Order No. 6. Emergency Order No. 6 will be effective in the City of Hudson, New York for a period of time beginning at 12:00 pm on March 30, 2020 and continuing in effect and ending at 12:00 pm on April 4, 2020, a period not to exceed five (5) days. Such order shall cease to be in effect as of April 4, 2020 at 12:00 pm, or upon my declaration that the state of emergency no longer exists, whichever occurs sooner. This order also may be extended for additional periods not to exceed five days each, during the pendency of the local state of emergency.

A Local State of Emergency Order may be issued to protect life and property or to bring an emergency situation under control.
Because the uncontrolled spread of COVID-19 threatens or imperils public safety, as Chief Executive of this municipality, I have exercised the authority given to me under New York State Executive Law, Article 2-B, to preserve the public safety and to issue orders rendering and implementing all required and available assistance and polices vital to the security, well-being and health of the citizens of the community at my disposal. Toward that end, I hereby order the following:

  1. Emergency Order No. 4, dated March 25, 2020 is here by extended until April 4, 2020 at noon;
  2. Emergency Order No. 5, dated March 26, 2020 is here by extended until April 4, 2020 at noon.

On March 26, 2020, Mayor Johnson issued an Emergency Order regarding Hudson's response to coronavirus.  

LOCAL STATE OF EMERGENCY ORDER NO. 5

EFFECTIVE: MARCH 26, 2020 AT 12:00 PM THROUGH MARCH 31, 2020 AT 12:00 PM

Pursuant to my proclamation declaring a Local State of Emergency in the City of Hudson, New York on March 16, 2020, I hereby issue Local Emergency Order No. 5, to amend and further clarify Local Emergency Order No. 4. Emergency Order No. 5 will be effective in the City of Hudson, New York for a period of time beginning at 12:00 pm on March 26, 2020 and continuing in effect and ending at 12:00 pm on March 31, 2020, a period not to exceed five (5) days. Such order shall cease to be in effect as of March 31, 2020 at 12:00 pm, or upon my declaration that the state of emergency no longer exists, whichever occurs sooner. This order also may be extended for additional periods not to exceed five days each, during the pendency of the local state of emergency. 

A Local State of Emergency Order may be issued to protect life and property or to bring an emergency situation under control.

Because the uncontrolled spread of COVID-19 threatens or imperils public safety, as Chief Executive of this municipality, I have exercised the authority given to me under New York State Executive Law, Article 2-B, to preserve the public safety and to issue orders rendering and implementing all required and available assistance and polices vital to the security, well-being and health of the citizens of the community at my disposal. Toward that end, I hereby order the following:

  1. The public use of the City’s Dog Park located on Front Street may continue under the following conditions:
    a) No more than 6 people shall use the park at one time; and 
    b) Park users shall keep at least 6 feet distance between themselves and other people who are not otherwise quarantined together.
  2. Pathways, walkways and trails may be used in public parks but otherwise the use of public parks is prohibited, including playground areas, basketball courts, and picnic table and BBQ pit areas. 

On March 25, 2020, Mayor Johnson issued an Emergency Order regarding Hudson's response to coronavirus.  

LOCAL STATE OF EMERGENCY ORDER NO. 4

EFFECTIVE: MARCH 25, 2020 AT 12:00 PM THROUGH MARCH 30, 2020 AT 12:00 PM

Pursuant to my proclamation declaring a Local State of Emergency in the City of Hudson, New York on March 16, 2020, I hereby issue Local Emergency OrderNo. 4, to be effective in the City of Hudson, New York for a period of time beginning at 12:00 pm on March 25, 2020 and continuing in effect and ending at 12:00 pm on March 30, 2020, a period not to exceed five (5) days. Such order shall cease to be in effect as of March 30, 2020 at 12:00 pm, or upon my declaration that the state of emergency no longer exists, whichever occurs sooner. This order also may be extended for additional periods not to exceed five days each, during the pendency of the local state of emergency.

A Local State of Emergency Order may be issued to protect life and property or to bring an emergency situation under control.

Because the uncontrolled spread of COVID-19  threatens or imperils public safety, as Chief Executive of this municipality, I have exercised the authority given to me under New York State Executive Law, Article 2-B, to preserve the public safety and to issue orders rendering and implementing all required and available assistance and polices vital to the security, well-being and health of the citizens of the community at my disposal. Toward that end, I hereby order the following:

  1. The public use of administrative buildings including City Hall, Parks and Recreation, Public Works, the Water Department and the Public Safety Building will be limited.  In order to keep the City running smoothly and staff safe, the City’s administration offices will be significantly reduced. City Hall will be closed to the public except by appointment only for essential services. Business in the departments that can be conducted online, such as paying parking tickets, property taxes, and water or other bills, should be done online at the City’s website, http://www.cityofhudson.org or over the phone. All public programs at the Youth Center and Senior Center are canceled. All City employee travel will be restricted, all conferences and workshops will be cancelled. 

  1. All non-essential City meetings will be canceled. Common Council meetings will be held but all other meetings of public Boards and Commissions, including the Planning Board, Zoning Board and Hudson Preservation Commission will be cancelled for the duration of this Order.  Committee meetings of the Council may be held at the discretion of the Council President. 

  1. Notwithstanding paragraph 2, the Hudson Preservation Commission will be permitted to meet in a non-public, virtual/electronic session on March 27, 2020 to formally issue Certificates of Approval (CofAs) which were informally approved at the Commission’s March 13, 2020 meeting. No other business or new applications will be conducted or accepted at this meeting and all future meetings of the HPC after March 27, 2020 shall be canceled as per paragraph 2. The purpose of the March 27, 2020 meeting is to review the informally approved CofAs and issue a formal vote of approval. The votes on the following projects can be taken electronically, as further set forth below in paragraph 5, without a threat to the public health or safety, allowing, in some cases, work on these projects to continue: 
    558 Warren St – sign
    542 State St – enclosing a porch to fix a water leak
    127 Union St – porch roof
    226 Union St – fence, shingles, removal of chimney, relocate windows, renovate porch
    41-43 N 7th Street – renovation/conversion to restaurant

  1. Notwithstanding paragraph 2, the Hudson Tourism Board shall be permitted to meet as per paragraph 5, as convened at the request of the Mayor or Common Council President to address the urgent needs of the business community in Hudson which is being significantly and adversely impacted by the COVID-19  pandemic. 

  2. Per the Governor’s Executive Order, https://www.governor.ny.gov/news/no-2021-continuing-temporary-suspension-and-modification-laws-relating-disaster-emergency, Article 7 of the Public Officers Law is suspended and the public will not be permitted to attend Common Council meetings or Committee meetings, if held, in person.  Meetings that are held will be live streamed, (instructions will be on the website to access live streaming), and a transcript or minutes, as required, will be made available  on the website, following the meeting. Council Members may attend via electronic means, however, where possible, the Common Council President or his designee must attend the meeting in person. 

  3. With the exception of public walking trails which may be used while keeping at least 6 feet distance between individuals who are not otherwise quarantined together, all city parks will be closed to the public, including playground areas, basketball courts, and picnic table and BBQ pit areas.

  4. Alternative side of the street parking regulation authorized by section 305-8 of the Hudson City Code and Hudson Police Commissioner Memorandum dated January 5, 1972 is suspended. 

  5. The payment of parking meter fees as required by section 305-20(A) is suspended.  

  6. Payment of late fees for parking tickets issued between February 1, 2020 and March 31, 2020 will be waived but will begin to accrue as of  June 15, 2020 if the ticket is not paid by June 1, 2020. 

In addition to the Orders set forth above, the Governor of the State of New York has issued several Executive Orders as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic which can be viewed here.  https://www.governor.ny.gov/executiveorders  Of particular concern to the people of Hudson please note: 

  1. Per the Governor’s Executive Order, https://www.governor.ny.gov/news/no-2023-continuing-temporary-suspension-and-modification-laws-relating-disaster-emergency events and other gatherings have been severely limited. Accordingly, no largepublic gatherings of more than 50 people may be held as per the Governor’s order, as such conditions threaten or imperil the public safety of the citizens of Hudson. This requirement also applies to houses of worship.  

  2. Per the Governor’s Executive Order https://www.governor.ny.gov/news/no-2023-continuing-temporary-suspension-and-modification-laws-relating-disaster-emergency  any restaurant or bar in the state of New York shall cease serving patrons food or beverage on-premises effective at 8 pm on March 16, 2020, and until further notice shall only serve food or beverage for off-premises consumption.


On March 20, 2020, Mayor Johnson issued an Emergency Order regarding Hudson's response to coronavirus.  

LOCAL STATE OF EMERGENCY ORDER #3

Pursuant to my proclamation declaring a Local State of Emergency in the City of Hudson, New York on March 16, 2020, I hereby issue Local Emergency Order No. 3, to be effective in the City of Hudson, New York for a period of time beginning at 12:00 pm on March 20, 2020 and continuing in effect and ending at 12:00 pm on March 25, 2020, a period not to exceed five (5) days. Such order shall cease to be in effect as of March 25, 2020 at 12:00 pm, or upon my declaration that the state of emergency no longer exists, whichever occurs sooner. This order may be extended for additional periods not to exceed five days each, during the pendency of the local state of emergency.

A Local State of Emergency Order may be issued to protect life and property or to bring an emergency situation under control.

Because the uncontrolled spread of COVID-19 threatens or imperils public safety, as Chief Executive of this municipality, I have exercised the authority given to me under New York State Executive Law, Article 2-B, to preserve the public safety and to issue orders rendering and implementing all required and available assistance and polices vital to the security, well-being and health of the citizens of the community at my disposal. Toward that end, I hereby order the following:

  1. The public use of administrative buildings including City Hall, Parks and Recreation, Public Works, the Water Department and the Public Safety Building will be limited. In order to keep the City running smoothly and staff safe, the City’s administration offices will be significantly reduced. City Hall will be closed to the public except by appointment only for essential services. Business in the departments that can be conducted online, such as paying parking tickets, paying taxes or bills, should be done online at the City’s website, http://www.cityofhudson.org or over the phone. All public programs at the Youth Center and Senior Center are canceled. All City employee travel will be restricted, all conferences and workshops will be cancelled.
  2. All non-essential City meetings will be canceled. Common Council meetings will be held but all other meetings of public Boards and Commissions, including the Planning Board, Zoning Board and Hudson Preservation Commission will be cancelled for the duration of this Order. Committee meetings of the Council may be held at the discretion of the Council President. 
  3. Per the Governor’s Executive Order, https://www.governor.ny.gov/news/no-2021-continuing-temporary-suspension-and-modification-laws-relating-disaster-emergency, Article 7 of the Public Officers Law is suspended and the public will not be permitted to attend Common Council meetings or Committee meetings, if held, in person. Meetings that are held will be live streamed, (instructions will be on the website to access live streaming), and a transcript will be made available on the website, following the meeting. Council Members may attend via electronic means, however, where possible, the Common Council President or his designee must attend the meeting in person. 
  4. Alternative side of the street parking regulation authorized by section 305-8 of the Hudson City Code and Hudson Police Commissioner Memorandum dated January 5, 1972 is suspended. 
  5. The payment of parking meter fees as required by section 305-20(A) is suspended. 

In addition to the Orders set forth above, the Governor of the State of New York has issued several Executive Orders as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic which can be viewed here. https://www.governor.ny.gov/executiveorders Of particular concern to the people of Hudson please note:

  • Per the Governor’s Executive Order, https://www.governor.ny.gov/news/no-2023-continuing-temporary-suspension-and-modification-laws-relating-disaster-emergency events and other gatherings have been severely limited. Accordingly, no large public gatherings of more than 50 people may be held as per the Governor’s order, as such conditions threaten or imperil the public safety of the citizens of Hudson. This requirement also applies to houses of worship.
  • Per the Governor’s Executive Order https://www.governor.ny.gov/news/no-2023-continuing-temporary-suspension-and-modification-laws-relating-disaster-emergency any restaurant or bar in the state of New York shall cease serving patrons food or beverage on-premises effective at 8 pm on March 16, 2020, and until further notice shall only serve food or beverage for off-premises consumption.

On March 18, 2020, Mayor Johnson issued an Emergency Order regarding Hudson's response to coronavirus

LOCAL STATE OF EMERGENCY ORDER #2

Pursuant my proclamation declaring a Local State of Emergency in the City of Hudson, New York on March 16, 2020, I hereby issue Local Emergency Order No. 2, to be effective in the City of Hudson, New York for a period of time beginning at 5 pm on March 18, 2020 and continuing in effect and ending at 12:00 pm on March 20, 2020, a period not to exceed five (5) days. Such order shall cease to be in effect as of March 20, 2020 at 12:00 pm, or upon my declaration that the state of emergency no longer exists, whichever occurs sooner. This order may be extended for additional periods not to exceed five days each during the pendency of the local state of emergency.

A Local Emergency Order may be issued to protect life and property or to bring an emergency situation under control.
Because the uncontrolled spread of COVID-19 threatens or imperils public safety, as Chief Executive of this municipality, I have exercised the authority given to me under New York State Executive Law, Article 2-B, to preserve the public safety and to issue orders rendering and implementing all required and available assistance and polices vital to the security, well-being and health of the citizens of the community at my disposal. Toward that end, I hereby order the following:

  1. Alternative side street parking regulation authorized by section 305-8 of the Hudson City Code and Hudson Police Commissioner Memorandum dated January 5, 1972 is suspended; and
  2. The payment of parking meter fees as required by section 305-20(A) is suspended.

On March 16, 2020, Mayor Johnson issued an Emergency Order regarding Hudson's response to coronavirus


LOCAL STATE OF EMERGENCY PROCLAMATION AND EMERGENCY ORDER

Local State of Emergency Proclamation

Pursuant to New York State Executive Law, Article 2-B, Section 24, I hereby declare and proclaim a Local State of Emergency in the City of Hudson, New York beginning March 16, 2020. This Proclamation shall remain in effect for a period not to exceed thirty days or until I rescind such Proclamation, whichever occurs first.

This State of Emergency has been declared due to emergency conditions produced by:

"The uncontrolled contagion of the novel coronavirus known as COVID-19, and the need to limit the spread of the disease to the people of Hudson, particularly vulnerable populations such as the elderly, those with compromised immune systems, and those with other underlying health issues that predispose them to respiratory infections. Due to both nation-wide and local limitations on medical supplies and the limited availability of life saving medical equipment such as respirators that could help save the lives of those in vulnerable populations, it is important to slow the contagion rate to the greatest extent possible. Slowing this rate will better enable health care providers and first responders to manage the health care needs of the population caused by this pandemic, as defined by the World Health Organization; prevent mass public contagion; and ensure that City staff remain healthy and able to safely manage the business of the City, particularly staff who provide essential services to the residents of Hudson." 

Local Emergency Order
Pursuant to New York State Executive Law, Article 2-B, Section 24, I further hereby issue a Local Emergency Order to be effective in the City of Hudson, New York for a period of time beginning at 5 pm on March 16, 2020 and continuing in effect and ending at 12:00 pm on March 20, 2020, a period not to exceed five (5) days. Such order shall cease to be in effect as of March 20, 2020 at 12:00 pm, or upon my declaration that the state of emergency no longer exists, whichever occurs sooner. This order may be extended for additional periods not to exceed five days each during the pendency of the local state of emergency.

A Local Emergency Order may be issued to protect life and property or to bring an emergency situation under control.

Because the uncontrolled spread of COVID-19 threatens or imperils public safety, as Chief Executive of this municipality, I have exercised the authority given to me under New York State Executive Law, Article 2-B, to preserve the public safety and to issue orders rendering and implementing all required and available assistance and polices vital to the security, well-being and health of the citizens of the community at my disposal. Toward that end, I hereby order the following:

  1. The Department(s) of Fire, Youth, Police, Code Enforcement, Public Works, Treasury, Water, and City Hall Clerk related business shall take whatever steps necessary to protect life and property, public infrastructure and other such emergency assistance as deemed necessary.
  2. At a minimum, I will be limiting the public use of administrative buildings including City Hall, Parks and Recreation, Public Works, the Water Department and the Public Safety Building. In order to keep the City running smoothly and staff safe, the City’s administration offices will be operating and fully functioning but with limited public access. Business in the these departments that can be conducted online, such as paying parking tickets, paying taxes or bills, should be done online at the City’s website, http://www.cityofhudson.org or over the phone. The Clerk’s Office and Code Enforcement and Building Department will be taking special appointments for in-person interactions. 
  3. All City employee travel will be restricted, all conferences and workshops will be cancelled. 
  4. All non-essential City meetings will be postponed. Common Council meetings will be held but all other public Boards and Commissions will be cancelled or postponed. 
  5. Per the Governor’s Executive Order, Article 7 of the Public Officers Law is suspended and the public will not be permitted to attend Common Council Meetings in person. Meetings will be live streamed, (instructions will be on the website to access live streaming), and a transcript will be made available on the website, following the meeting. Council Members may attend via electronic means, however, where possible, the Common Council President or his designee must attend the meeting in person. 
  6. Per the Governor’s Executive Order,  for events and gatherings, please follow all State orders and regulations. Accordingly, no large public gatherings may be held as per the Governor’s order, as such conditions threaten or imperil the public safety of the citizens of Hudson. This requirement also applies to houses of worship. 

--

 Learn more about Hudson's response to coronavirus.

 


Apr 16,2020 IMG_1886

Dunn Warehouse Roof Stabilization Complete

IMG_1886

The city of Hudson completed the temporary roof repair to the Dunn Warehouse. An Invitation for bids was issued on February 7. The project is funded through a Restore NY Grant and is part of Hudson's Downtown Revitalization Initiative.

“I’m glad we have a roof repair to the Dunn Warehouse. This is an important building for our past and our future. It's important to my administration to have continued progress. This project has been in works for several years and thank you to everyone contributing to it.”
-Mayor Kamal Johnson


Apr 09,2020

100 Days

Mayor Kamal Johnson writes a letter to Hudson.

Dear Hudson,

Today marks Day 100 of my term. During the course of the campaign, I never could have imagined that in my first three months we would be dealing with a global pandemic. I’m impressed with how well the people of Hudson have responded to this crisis and collaborated as a community to address the needs of all of our residents. This is what the soul of our city has always been. In times of crisis, we come together. I have seen the care Hudson has for each other a million times over my lifetime.

Our Department of Public Works quickly revised their protocols to be aligned with the CDC guidelines and to meet all the recommendations of the Governors Executive Order and the Columbia County Health Department. They continue to keep our necessary services in place including trash and recycling pick-up and ensuring our safe water supply keeps flowing.

The Hudson Police Department is working with our community to give guidance to people in taking all the safety precautions seriously. They are doing Wellness checks on our Seniors, increasing participation in their Elder Call-in Program, and are even dropping off lifesaving medicine to constituents in need. Our Fire Department remains steady and ready. Their tribute to our first responders and health care professionals was a moment to remember. Our City Hall staff and Treasurer’s Department continue to keep our city’s systems in place even with information continually being updated from the State.

The Senior Center has collaborated with the Hudson Area Library to provide their programs virtually and has been able to increase the number of their participants as a result. The outpouring of support from the community and their offers to volunteer has been heartwarming and inspiring. On any given day you will witness the Youth Department staff full of volunteers delivering food to over 400 of our neighbors. This is what community means and this is Hudson.

I know COVID-19 has created fear in each member of our community during this time. Our storefronts are closed but our businesses are still finding ways to help the community and I personally thank you. As your Mayor, I will continue to do everything that I can to save our businesses and to provide relief for those in need. As much as I can speak on behalf of the Common Council and the Hudson Development Corporation, I can tell you they are joining me in this effort and giving their all to the task at hand.

Personally, the highlight for me was working with Spark of Hudson to deliver over 40 WIFI hotspots to students without internet access as the Hudson City School District transitioned to distance learning. I have been inspired by the dedication of the teachers, the principals, and all the school staff as they continue to provide instruction and necessary meals to their students. They are leaders in our community inspiring our Youth every day.

What have we done in 100 Days? Through a partnership between my office and the Galvan Foundation, we will bring over 70 units of affordable housing to Hudson. My goal to keep families in Hudson remains the same. This crisis has only strengthened my commitment to our families and all the members of our community.

The Anti-Displacement Team is hard at work meeting remotely and working innovative initiatives. Plans are underway for our first time Home Buyers’ program and credit recovery initiative. The Downtown Revitalization Initiative (DRI) is underway and we plan on breaking ground on our projects this year. The city also created a Climate Smart task force to pursue certification in the NYS Climate Smart Communities Program. Our team composed of elected officials and Commissioners are scheduled to undergo a complete street training next month. The city website is continually updated and has information about all the programs mentioned. Visit our website and sign up to be notified of any updates.

We will come out of this stronger than ever. Hudson continues to be a thriving city. We coined the term All Hands On Deck during my campaign and it means more now than ever. My wish is that we learn from this pandemic and have a greater sense of empathy for all of our neighbors. That same feeling of financial fear our business community is facing now is the same fear many of our citizens felt long before this crisis.

Together, we will create opportunities for each of us to grow and to pursue our dreams for ourselves and for our city. This pandemic has taught us that we are all vulnerable and that our ability to survive depends on what each of us does every day. Warren St. faces the same crisis as the rest of the city, together we thrive.

Thank you to our community members who have stepped up as leaders in this time of crisis and offered to support their neighbors in any way they can. Thank you for trusting me to lead our city. Although, when I said let’s make history this isn’t exactly what I had in mind. We are strong and together we can make history that we will all be proud of. We have come far due to a great team that includes The Mayoral Aide Michael Chameides, our city attorneys, and all the department heads and commissioners. The best is yet to come…...

Sincerely,
Honorable Mayor Kamal Johnson


Apr 01,2020

Climate Smart Task Force

Working with Cornell Cooperative Extension of Columbia and Greene Counties (CCE), the City of Hudson announces the creation of a Climate Smart Task Force to pursue certification in the NYS Climate Smart Communities Program. The task force will begin by conducting an assessment, identifying what the City has been or is doing and what actions are priorities to take next. The final step in the process will be to submit the documentation and request certification as a Climate Smart Community (CSC).

CCE will provide technical expertise and administrative support for the task force. This project is a program of CCE in partnership with the NYS DEC Hudson River Estuary Program, NY Water Resources Institute, and Cornell University with support from the NYS Environmental Protection Fund.

“Climate change will have devastating impacts and the City of Hudson must reduce greenhouse gas emissions,” says Mayor Kamal Johnson. “We must prepare for a changing climate by identifying and deploying adaptation strategies. It’s an added benefit that many of these climate strategies will save money over the long-term.”

In addition to the assessment and submission for certification, CCE will work with the city of Hudson to create a flood guide and road stream crossing management plan. These projects count as actions in the CSC program and are important to sustainability planning in the City of Hudson, especially with increasingly intense weather events and rising waters of climate change.

“CCE is deeply committed to supporting our local communities and very proud to work with the City of Hudson to achieve these immensely beneficial Climate Smart Community project goals,” CCE stated.

The CSC program offers a variety of benefits to the City including cost savings through greater efficiency, greater energy independence, and security as well as streamlined access to resources. In addition to the environmental and planning benefits, the city of Hudson would be recognized as a leader with higher scores on grant applications and eligibility for funding opportunities.

Mayor Johnson is appointing Mayor's Aide Michael Chameides to chair the Climate Smart Communities Task Force and to serve as the Climate Smart Coordinator. Chameides has worked on several city initiatives and has also collaborated with state and federal elected officials and departments. He has professional experience with environmental advocacy, communications, strategic planning, and operations. He serves on the Columbia County Board of Supervisors and has been an advocate for public transportation, parks, and a clean Hudson River.

“Sustainability is a top priority for myself and the Mayor,” says Chameides. “This task force is an important opportunity to create an institutional commitment to a sustainable future. The Covid-19 crisis shows us the importance of following science and the need for planning and preventive action.”

Also serving on the Task Force will be Kam Bellamy, Michael O’Hara, John Rosenthal, Briggin Scharf, and Tony Stone. The Task Force includes members of Hudson’s executive branch, legislative branch, and Conservation Advisory Council as well as community members with a background and passion for environmentalism.

Kam Bellamy spent the bulk of her adult life living in intentional communities in which residents grew and produced much of their own food and shared income, cars, and houses. She is the President of the Board of Camphill Hudson as well as the Executive Director of the Foundation for Agricultural Integrity, a private foundation dedicated to the promotion of regenerative agriculture and restorative communities. Bellamy was recently accepted to the Yale School of Management and will matriculate this summer in pursuit of an Executive MBA with a focus on Sustainability.

Michael O’Hara is an environmental policy advocate who engages with elected officials at the local, state, and national levels to support actions to create a more livable environment. He worked on the Hudson Cool Cities committee in 2006 which produced a baseline energy inventory for the city which led to the signing of the “U.S. Mayors Climate Protection Agreement” by the mayor of Hudson. He has worked in finance and sales of solar electric systems and was the operations director at Sustainable Hudson Valley and former Commissioner of Public Works for the City of Hudson. He is a founding member of Columbia County Futures, a local community development organization. O’Hara also serves on Hudson’s Conservation Advisory Council.

John Rosenthal serves on the Common Council and chairs the Legal Committee and Department of Public Works Committee. He is also a historical writer, researcher, and screenwriter.

Briggin Scharf celebrates the ecosystems of the Hudson River Watershed through agriculture and outdoor education. They are a founding member of Rolling Grocer 19, a collective committed to increasing food access for everyone in Columbia County, They also manage Kite's Nest's ReGen Program which empowers youth leaders for environmental, social, and food justice.

Tony Stone, a co-founder of Basilica Hudson and River House Project, is a filmmaker whose films have been exhibited worldwide at film festivals and released theatrically by Magnolia Pictures. He has worked on numerous green energy projects, focusing on converting historic buildings to be carbon neutral without any fossil fuel usage.

Cornell Cooperative Extension Columbia and Greene Counties puts knowledge to work in pursuit of economic vitality, ecological sustainability, and social well-being. We bring local experience and research-based solutions together, helping Columbia and Greene County families and communities thrive in our rapidly changing world.

The Hudson River Estuary Program helps people enjoy, protect, and revitalize the Hudson River and its valley. Created in 1987 through the Hudson River Estuary Management Act, the program focuses on the tidal Hudson and adjacent watershed from the federal dam at Troy to the Verrazano Narrows in New York City.

For more information on CCE of Columbia and Greene Counties and other program offerings, visit their website www.ccecolumbiagreene.org. Cornell Cooperative Extension is an employer and educator recognized for valuing AA/EEO, Protected Veterans, and Individuals with Disabilities and provides equal program and employment opportunities.

4/1/2020

Mar 31,2020

Columbia County Business Continuity Fund

Columbia County Business Continuity Fund will provide cash grants to small businesses in our city and town centers with fewer than 10 full-time employees and less than $1 million in annual revenue. These businesses can apply for grant funds from $1,000 to $5,000 to cover costs related to retaining employees, rent, and other fixed operational costs.

“The small businesses in Hudson are a major driver of not only our economy but also our community,” said Hudson Mayor Kamal Johnson. “They are among the first to donate or sponsor an event or cause. When we say ‘All Hands on Deck,’ we mean it and it’s time to reach a hand out to save our local businesses.”

The fund will accept applications from April 1 to April 15. 

The Columbia County Business Continuity Fund is established by the Berkshire Taconic Community Foundation and Columbia Economic Development Corporation, in partnership with the Columbia Chamber of Commerce, and the Hudson Business Coalition. Foundations, Business, Community, Elected Officials, and Donors help seed funds to support nonprofits and small businesses.


Mar 30,2020

Trash Collection

Learn about trash Collection During the Covid-19 State of Emergency.

The City is making every effort to reduce the possibility of transmitting the virus by any City employee or activity. With respect to the sale of trash bags the City has taken the following steps to address this crisis: 

  1. Trash bags are delivered to the City in sealed cases. The current stockpile of cases was delivered months ago, is not contaminated by the virus and cases remain in storage until needed.
  2. Trash bags are removed from cases by people wearing gloves who fold them into single units or multi-packs of five to fit into the trash bag vending machine.
  3. The bags are loaded into the machine and sanitizer is used.
  4. The machine is regularly sanitized by the city.
  5. The vending machine is equipped to take payment by Apple Pay, thereby reducing the need to touch the machine. 

If residents are able, they may use personal gloves and or sanitizer when using the machine. The City recommends that residents wash their hands often and as soon as possible after purchasing trash bags.

We also suggest that residents purchase the 5-pack of small bags, which should last most households 5 weeks, and consider purchasing trash bags when also shopping for other essential items like food. If you are in a high-risk group for Covid-19, please consider asking family, friends, or neighbors to purchase bags for you.

Trash bag fees help fund not only portion of the salaries provided to Department of Public Works (DPW) workers, they also defray the “tipping fees” (the fee charged by the county to “tip” the garbage truck load into the landfill). The most recent tipping fee for a week’s worth of City trash was $1,000. The fee reflects a portion of the real costs of trash generation and disposal and is not a fee that the City can waive at this time. To reduce your household cost to dispose of trash, you may consider reducing the amount of trash generated.

A word about Conservation 

The DPW has reported that the City’s average weekly tonnage of trash has increased dramatically since the start of the pandemic. Prior to March, the City generated approximately four tons of trash per week. Last week City residents generated nine tons of trash, or more than double the usual amount, most likely because more people are home and others are cleaning out closets and doing early spring cleaning.

We encourage you to consider your waste generation. Are there ways you can reduce, recycle or reuse, find a recipe for those leftovers, or use a dish, rather than paper towel for that sandwich? Everyone one can make a difference and even small efforts matter. Conserving resources and reducing trash will not only save you money and help the environment but will give our overworked and potentially reduced DPW staff a break.

If for some reason you are not able to secure City trash bags during this crisis, please contact the DPW staff who will try to help you secure bags. 

Thank you for your cooperation, we appreciate your pitching in during this crisis.

Learn more about city of Hudson trash pick up
Learn more about Covid-19 Response and Resources


Mar 29,2020 Screen Shot 2020-03-29 at 9.57.41 PM

Empire State Trail

Mar 29, 2020

Construction is scheduled to begin this week on Harry Howard Avenue for a shared-use bike/walking path. Please use extra caution if driving on Harry Howard Avenue. 


The project is part of the Empire State Trail, which will be a continuous 750-mile route spanning the state from New York City to Canada and Buffalo to Albany. The section of the trail will connect the Dugway from Mill Street to Greenport and make it easier to walk or bike to Hudson City Schools as well as Mill Street and Charles Williams Park.

Uility poles will be moved to make space for the dedicated bike/walk lane. Next, hydrants and catch basins will be relocated. Then construction of a 12 foot wide multi-use path. There will be intermittant lane closures during this period. 

While non-essential workers are directed to work from home, "essential construction may continue and includes roads." Workers at site must maintain social distance, including for purposes of meals, entry, and exit.

This project builds on the 2012 Safe-Routes-To-Schools plan. It also improves ac